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Full text of "History and directory of Posey County [Indiana] : containing an account of the early settlement and organization of the county ... : also a complete list of the tax-payers, their post-office addresses and places of residence, together with a business directory of Mt. Vernon and New Harmony ... also biographical sketches of prominent citizens of the county"

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1480982 

GENEALOGY COLLECTION 



.ALLEN County PUBLIC 



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DEALERS IN- 



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FURNITURE, STOVES. TINWARE. 

AND 



No. 23 Main Street, 



EUGEiNE A. WILSON, 

PROPRIETOR POST OFFICE NEWS STAND, 
A1TD CIGARS, 

0%»%&@»fl)ir2r P Sfows^ |pe«ii,©>gl£e?>al@ P X%e«» 




Uaaed. 



PrintEd and Bannd this WDrk, at his 

jfk8t<la88 Book Establishment 
£VANSVIUU£, IND, 



ANTON RABEN. 



GEORGE NAAS. 



RABBIT <& NAAS, 




DEALERS IN- 



MEN'S & BOYS'- 



CLOTHING, 

ffootd, f§hoed, jfata, J|apa, ijotiona, Spa, 

3fcTos 26 & 28 Main Street, 

Mt. Vernon, Ind. 



-THE- 



(Established in 1867,) 

ALBERT A, SPARK6, EDITOR & PROPRIETOR, 

Mt. Vernon, Indiana, 



THE OFFICIAL PAPER OF POSE! CO. 



\A ( Q&wiiyc%aAA,c vvv ^oti/tvc-^, cut all 'Wwe^ a/mi iivi-deA, 

o| c^Wvuo/kiA on- ait <y\A-Vv2mX taln/i/oV 

-ti/6/Vi/ oi a/Vi/ty ji/a/U/eA/ wi/ tfv© ©ovuvvti/K a/wcl iA ooa^6^= 

r 4l i tu Best anb most IReliable ^ 



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All kinds of Job Work, Heatly and Promptly 
.^executed.^ 



John Pfeffer. Phillip Traudt. 



I III 1 



PROPRIETORS OF 



Favorite Mills, 



And IDealers in. 



Flour,Corn-Meal,<§£.c. 

Corner Third <& Mill Sts M 

]|ft. Ifernon, jndiana, 

Highest DPrice Faid. IFor "^7"lieat. 



4/pp -s^atm-, 



49 MAIN STREET, MT, VERNON, IND., 

"^7*lio is a ^Eercto.ant Tailor, ' 

Is the Largest Dealer in this Line here and carries one of the Largest 

and best assorted stocks of «»©» ®®Q>mm in the City. 

As a cutter of clothing, Mr. Mann has no superior in 
the county, and by making faultless fits and turning out 
a superb grade of work, his reputation as a fashionable 
tailor has spread throughout this section of country and 
many who formerly had their fashionable work made in 
Evansville, now get it here. Mr. Mann, keeps always 
on hand a full and complete line of Piece Goods, 
ranging in quality from the richest and most costly to 
the cheaper grades, to suit every taste and condition of 
purse. They are all brand new, fresh and of the best 
quality of the most fashionable shades and colors, and 
made up to order in any style as cheaply as the same 
can be bought for in this market from the fact that Mr. 
Mann pays cash and gets the benefit of all discounts, 
which advantage he extends to his customers in the way 
of low prices. Both as a Merchant and Tailor; Mr. 
Mann understands his business thoroughly, is a clever, 
liberal and affable gentleman, and parties entrusting work 
to his care may rest assured that it will receive his per- 
sonal attention, and that satisfaction will be guaranteed 
in every case. 



^3mc£txt WSL&tkzmtx, 



-DEALER IN 



Family Groceries, 

CHOICE LIQUORS, 

CIGARS & TOBACCO, 

No. 94, Corner Main &. Fourth Sts., 

Mt. Vernon, Indiana. 



Stock Accommodated at his Large 
Wagon and Stock Yard. 



Storage Capacity, 300,000 Bushels. < ^%^. 

Grinding Capacity, 1,000 Barrels per Day. (kiy^^ 

ESTABLISHED 1852. 

THEODORE: JiUDNUT, 

L£a.rruia.Gt.\a.rer of 

Hominy, Grits, 

f «»rl Ileal, ped,- 
CORNFLOUR, 

CLEAN MEAL. 

MILLS IN 

TERRE HAUTE, IND,, 
MT, YERNDN, IND,, 
CLINTDN LDCKS, IND,, 
U, S, A, 



Ell our (Boobs are tfirst Class anb tborougbl\> 
KILN DRIED, 



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PHOTOGRAPHER, 




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Ibistor^ anb 2)itector^ 

t»ose? Count? 



Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1882, by 

W. P. LEOHABD, 

In the Office of the Librarian of Congress, at Washington. 



HISTORY' 



-AND- 



DIRECTORY 



-OF- 



POSEY COUNTY __ 



Containing an account of the early settlement and organi- 
zation of the County of Posey, Ind., with references 
to the formation of the north west territory, 
Indiana Territory, and the State of 
Indiana ; also numerous inci- 
dents, TRAGICAL AND 

otherwise, 

which have occurred 

in the County; also a complete 

list of the tax-payers, their post-office 

addresses and places of residence, together 

WITH A BUSINESS DIRECTORY OF Mt. VERNON AND NEW HAR- 
MONY, BESIDES LOCAL & GENERAL INFORMATION OF PECULIAR INTEREST: 
ALSO BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF PROMINENT CITIZENS OF THE COUNTY. 



BY W, P, LEONARD, 



EVANSVILLE: 
ISAACS, BOOK PRINTER& BINDER 



INDEX TO CONTENTS. 



Page 

Bethel Twp, (sketch of). . . 51 
Blackford (sketch of) . . . 86 
Black Twp, (sketch of ) . . . 50 
Blairsville, (sketch of ) . . . 88 
Business Directory Mt. Ver- 
non and New Harmony . . 245 
Caborn, (sketch of) . . . . 88 

Calvin (sketch of) 88 

Center Twp, (sketch of ) . . 52 
Chainville (sketch of ) . . . 88 
Courts of the County ... 24 
Cynthiana (sketch of) ... 88 
Farmersville (sketch of) . . 89 
Governors of Indiana . . .117 
Governors oflndianaTerritory 1 1 7 
Grafton (sketch of) ... . 89 
Harmony Twp (sketch of ) . . 51 
History Early settlement and 
organization of Posey 

County 3 

"Hoop-Pole" Twp (sketch of ) 53 
Incidents-Tragical and other- 
wise 92 

Judges Supreme Court of In- 
diana 116 

Lynn Twp (sketch of) . . . 50 
Mt. Vernon (sketch of) . . 54 
Manufacturing facilities and 

results 16 

Marrs Twp (sketch of ) . . . 49 
New Baltimore (sketch of) . . 89 
New Harmony (sketch of ) . . 75 



Officers of Posey County . .112 

Point Twp (sketch of ) . . . 52 
Posey County Court House 

Frontispiece 

Posey County Directory . .131 

Posey's War Record . . . . 36 

Price's Station (sketch of) . . 90 

Robb Twp (sketch of) ... 49 

Robinson Twp (sketch of ) . . 51 

Saint Phillip 90 

St. Wendel 90 

Smith Twp (sketch of ) . . . 49 

Springfield 90 

Stewartsville 91 

Wadesville 91 

Wagnon Twp (sketch of ) . . 51 

West Franklin 92 

Winfield (sketch of) .... 89 

Woodville 92 

Biographical — 



Alexander Mrs M . 
Brinkman Henry . 
Brown Edward . . 
Crunk Alexander . 
Edson Judge Wm P 
Hayes Edward S . 
Hutch eson Philo A 
Milner Sylvanus . . 
Rowe George D . . 
Schnurr Henry . . 
Welborn Joseph . . 



118 
119 
120 
121 
123 
124 
126 
127 
127 
128 
129 



1480982 

INDEX TO ADVERTISEMENTS. 



Page 

Artes Chas F 1 f 

Blount Henry F " ' 2b2 

Edson W. P l f 

Finch V. C. & Co l6 4 

Gentry Bros 2I2 

Green & Hutcheson 2I2 

Gronemeier S. H 2I2 

Heilman William J 44 

Henrich George x 4» 

Herrmann & Bro 2 °4 

Isaacs AC 26r 

Kilbinger John 2l2 

Louisville & Nashville Ry. (Evansville Route) 15° 

Magill Jas. & Robt l6 4 

Maier Conrad T 4 6 

McArthur Wm. M. & Co *1 2 

McCallister A. C. & Son x 72 

Miller George & Co J 4o 

Miller John W 2I2 

Oregon Mill Co 2I2 

Owen Ernest D. 2o8 

Schiela J. F. cV Bro x 4 2 

Schneider & Co l8 ° 

Shearer & Briggs 2 * 2 

Smith Elwood Ib * 

Thomas & Topper ' Ibo 

Tischendorf Emma 2 33 

Walzjohn T °° 

Wardelmann John Ib ° 

Wasem Andrew* J 9" 

Weber Peter 2l2 Q 

WeirC. P *f 

Weisinger Henry 4 



L. EISENBURG & CO., 

C^DEALERS IN^i; 

Fashionable CLOTHING Ready"Made 

— -^3sr:D— 

(Senfs jfurnisbino (Soobs, 

ITO. 11© a*£-A.X2>T STREET, 
EVAN6V1LUE, INP. 

JACOB BISCHOFF ds CO., 

Corner Store and Second Streets, 

RflT. VERNON, BND. 

D£AL£RS IN GROCERI£S,UQUORS 

Crockery, Glassware & Country Produce. 

A. w. neumannT 
FUNERAL DIRECTOR 

Manufacturer and Dealer in 

Burial Cases, Caskets, IRobinos, Sbroubs 

And Genera! Funeral Outfits. 

Piirnitviie and Store Outfits to Oroler. 
Fourth Street, bet. Main & Store Sts., MT. VERNON, IND. 



J. H. SCHRICHTE, 

2<TO- 12-4 J^L^^12>T SOT^iEIET. 

JEvansville, ITnb. 

The finest work done and fits guaranteed. 



ESTABLISHED IN 1854. 

ttbe largest, Best Hppointe{> an& 
IN THE STATE OF INDIANA, 



«+■ *^Z 



We keep full and complete assortments of every grade, style and 
quality, from the Cheapest to the Finest Goods made. 

Carpets, Oil Cloths, Mattings & Rugs a Specialty. 

LACE CURTAINS, WINDOW SHADES & LAMBREQUINS. 
76 and 78 Hain Street, JIT. VERWOtf , IEFD. 

New York Office : 500 BROADWAY. 

Samples and prices sent everywhere on application. 

Water Street, Mt. Vernon, I ml. 

DEALER IN 

FANCY & STAPLE GROCERIES 

Hub all ftinfcs of Country iprofcmce. 



•*«f* -=<>». — 



Everything kept in a First-Class Establishment can be found at 

niSCHIEBER'S STORED 



c<M$> 



e) ° 



B@=,The bar is always supplied with the choicest Liquors and Cigars. 
If you want to be treated courteously and fairly give Gus a call. 



PREFATORY. 



Written history perpetuates glorious achievements, keeps alive 
epochs of the ages, revives events of the past, and by this means 
is made a valuable medium of information of an interesting and 
instructive nature . to the living and to their remote descendants. 
The art of writing, therefore, is the grandest of the long list of 
valuable discoveries, while that of reading takes second rank. 
These two accomplishments have contributed more towards the 
advancement and enjoyment of the races than all others combined. 
By writing, the beautiful fruits of fertile, energetic minds have been 
handed down from distant periods in the past and will be preserved 
for the far-reaching future, and which refined ambition, the gem of 
qualities possessed by man, will endeavor to surpass. By reading, 
the mental capacities are enlarged, thought is encouraged and memo- 
ry cultivated. The combination of both produces oratory, learning 
and morality. They destroy the germ of dissension and thus prevent 
wicked conflict. They create admiration, they destroy contention. 
They ennoble human character ; they drive home with eloquent 
force the wedge of truth, and fasten everlasting disgrace and pun- 
ishment upon the brutal acts of the evil-doer. They bring and hold 
principle at the front and make infamy repulsive. 

The art of writing is an impress of thought, 
A glorious thing, however dearly bought. 

Deeds of devotion, of patriotism and of heroism are recorded in 
the pages of history by means of this knowledge, and they are en- 
graven as permanently there as if fixed upon steel or stone. Through 
this splendid medium we are enabled to transmit to future genera- 
tions, that may come and go with the tide of life, a recital of scenes 
and incidents which have come to pass within the limits of Posey 
County since the date of its early settlement and organization. 

That our book is not free from errors we do not deny — all things 
originating from human action have been and always shall be vulner- 
able to the attacks of criticism. But we hope that our foibles may 
be dealt with in that spirit of charity which leaveneth the burden of 
weakness and aids the power of endurance. 

To our many kind friends who have assisted us in the prosecution 
of our labors of compilation, to our patrons on whom the publication 
of our work largely depended, we offer our grateful thanks, 



2 PREFATORY. 

The work of research alone has been attended with a trial of per- 
severance that cannot be approximated, while the arduous task of 
arrangement cannot be comprehended by any save those who are 
familiar in detail with a work of like character. 

Now that the product of our industry is ready to launch upon the 
sea of inspection, where it must encounter the waves of fault, and 
finally, we fear, be stranded upon the beach of exacting critical judg- 
ment, we send it forth with that destiny which must shape its end. 

We hope at some future time to publish a revision of our work, 
when we shall embody such additional interesting and valuable facts 
as have been necessarily ignored in this work. W. P. L. 



ERRATA 

On page 22, line 38, the word << land- should appear after the word '« enter " 

On page 34, line 27, « are qualified" should read are ^//qualified 

On page 34, line 35, -are employed "should be inserted afterthe word "teachers ' 

On page 62, line 39, the words "between the parties" should be omitted 

On page 85, line 1, the word completed should be used instead of the word "built ' 

On page 126, line 26, :i 1879" should read 1871. 



HISTORICAL. 



Early Settlement and Organization of Posey County — French 
Dominition — Treaty Between France and England — The 
" Palisadced" Fort at the Mouth of the Wabash — Prehis- 
toric — The Iroquois and Alonquin Indians — Black Hawk's 
Death — The Nation's Birth — Virginia's Cession to the 
United States — Formation of Indiana Territory — Appoint- 
ment of Governor Harrison — Indiana Becomes a State — 
Election of Jonathan Jennings, Governor — First Repre- 
sentatives in the Legislature — Original Counties of the 
Territory and State of Indiana — Origin of Posey County's 
Name — The Removal of the Capital — General Notes. 

In the vicissitudes of human affairs we find the existence of a 
general law, that the genius of the world is continual change 
" From life to death, from death to life again." 

In the common events of life this invariable law of change separates 
friend from friend — relatives from those most dear to each other ; the 
fireside that is cheerful to-day in a short time may find some, if not 
all its members, scattered abroad in distant lands. 

It is often interesting and useful to trace the leading events of the 
history of our country, not only from the first appearance of the white 
man, but back to prehistoric ages, the only proof of which we have 
exists in the scientific revelations of the scientists of the present day. 

But we may note, as we pass, the immutable changes that are con- 
stantly being made within the scope of our historic knowledge, and 
trace the improvements of mankind — in the present age — to the uni- 
versal advancement in the arts and sciences, agriculture and religion. 

In 1 8 14, or a little more than sixty-seven years ago, the organiza- 
tion of Posey County became one of the historical events of the early 
settlement of the Northwest Territory — two years before the great 
State of Indiana was admitted to the Union to fulfill a glorious part 
of America's destiny. Just previous to that time, in 1813, Warrick 
County, under an act of the Territorial government, was formed, and 
embraced, according to the bill, "All that territory which lies south of 
a line commencing at a point on the Wabash River, at the southwest 
corner of Gibson County, and running east to the line of Harrison 
County; thence south to the Ohio River," which included the exist- 



4 HISTORICAL SKETCHES. 

ing counties of Posey, Vanderburgh, Perry, a part of Crawford, 
Warrick and Spencer ; and which, previous to that time, comprised 
the greater portion of Knox. The county seat of Warrick at that time 
was the unpretentious village of Evansville. In the month of Sep- 
tember, 1814, by an act of the Legislature, Posey County was formed 
from parts of Gibson and Warrick. Then, in December, 1818, Van- 
derburgh was formed from Gibson, Warrick and Posey, when the 
present boundaries of Posey County were permanently fixed. At 
the formation of Indiana Territory it was divided into four counties, 
viz : Knox, Harrison, Clark and Dearborn. 

When we look back upon that age from this era of marvelous de- 
velopment and progression, when we draw a comparison of the condi- 
tion of affairs as they were then and as they are now, we find it hard 
to believe that such a change as has taken place could possibly be 
wrought. 

It is hard, indeed, 10 credit the stories of the severe trials related 
to us by those who experienced them, and to believe that they are 
anything more than tales of fiction, emanating from minds full of love 
for sensation, and from persons courting distinction in connection 
with deeds of romance. But history is infallible, and for that reason 
we consult its musty, dust-begrimed pages, to find that their words 
are verified therein; to find that it is a "twice-told tale/' 

And through this means, true as holy writ, 
We find no marks of a mischievous wit : 
By thorough and close investigation 
We learn the mighty truth of dissemination. 

Yes, the ones who give us statements regarding the condition of 
things in the days of long-ago, do so with no hope of being made the 
heroes of a startling narrative, or with any desire to have their names 
inscribed upon the immortal pages of history, as prominent actors in 
dramas of tragical situations that never had existence in reality. 

Inasmuch as the French claimed all that territory lying west of the 
Allegheny Mountains, and opposed all attempts made by the English 
to establish trading posts in that section, a clash of arms became one 
of the imminent and existing dangers from 1750 until the year 1763, 
when a definitive treaty between those countries was effected at the 
city of Paris, February 10th. In the year 1753 the government of 
England, satisfied that the question of settlement and possession 
could be decided only by conflict, urged a union of the English colo- 
nies, and accordingly preparations in Virginia, for the protection of 
the frontiers, by raising a military force, were inaugurated. In 1754, 
George Washington, the first President ot the United States, then a 
young army officer under the British Crown, made, upon the order of 
the Governor of Virginia, a reconnaissance of the territory lying in 



HISTORICAL SKETCHES. 5 

the vicinity of the headwaters of the Ohio, for the purpose of locating 
military posts and subjugating the country under British rule. It was 
while Major Washington was at Fort DuQuesne, the present site of 
Pittsburgh, that he learned from the Frenchmen of the existence of 
a "small palisadced fort" on the Ohio River, at the mouth of the Wa- 
bash, "where a large mound exists." The "mound" referred to was 
evidently the work of that peculiar race who inhabited America so 
many years ago. It is the opinion of those who have made a study 
of the mound builders, that the representatives of that extinct race of 
people inhabited Posey County a thousand or more years ago. Evi- 
dences of an extensive knowledge of the arts and mechanics are 
shown in the relics that they have left behind, a great many of which 
are in the possession of Mr. Charles J. Hovey and the estate of the 
late Dr. M. S. Blunt, of Mt. Vernon. The mound from which 
numerous implements of warfare, cooking utensils and various tools 
have been taken during the past half century (which was known for a 
great many years as "bone bank") has nearly all been washed away 
by the waters of the Wabash River, and which leaves the county 
nearly destitute of all traces of that industrious, ingenious and pecu- 
liar race of people. The early white inhabitants of the county sup- 
posed the mound was constructed by the Indians, as a "look-out," 
and as a protection from surprises by the enemy ; but excavations and 
research of the scientific men of the country, have forced the con- 
clusion that the theory regarding a prehistoric race is the most tangi- 
ble. They were beyond question much more civilized than the 
natives discovered by Columbus, and it is therefore to be deplored 
that their origin, history, progress and decay lie buried in obscurity. 
Many of their mounds are still in existence in the Mississippi Valley, 
as well as in Mexico and South America, from which Mr. Hovey has 
personally taken some rare specimens of their workmanship. Many 
theories have been advanced by the historian and naturalist regarding 
this race, but no positive determination has been reached ; and what 
became of them will probably never be known, as the names of their 
rulers have not been preserved, nor is there any record of the 
exploits of their chieftains. 

When the European explorers visited this country, nearly four 
centuries ago, they found the natives wholly ignorant of arts or litera- 
ture, and without any knowledge of their origin. Nothing could be 
learned from them concerning their predecessors, either by tradition 
or otherwise. The origin of the Indian race, therefore, is merely 
speculative, though the supposition that they sprang from the Mongo- 
lians of Asia, crossing probably at Behring Straits and coming south, 
is not without some reason. The absence of tradition or recorded 
history makes it impossible to trace the exact source of this race, 



6 HISTORICAL SKETCHES. 

though a strong physical resemblance between the immediate descend- 
ants of Shem and the American Indians is conclusive evidence that 
Eastern Asia was the place of their origin. The assumption of this 
theory being true, they met the descendants of Japheth on the Western 
Continent in the fifteenth century, after having passed half the dis- 
tance around the globe, in opposite directions from Mt. Ararat, the 
point where Noah and his sons took their departure from the ark, 
after their memorable confinement in that vessel. A few years after 
this meeting took place the descendants of Ham, the other branch of 
the family of Noah — who occupied Ethiopia — were brought to the 
New World from Africa, which was a fulfillment of the prophetic 
words contained in the 9th chapter and 27th verse of the book of 
Genesis: "God shall enlarge Japheth, and he shall dwell in the tents of 
Shem and Canaan shall be his servant." 

It will only be necessary, of the several tribes who inhabited this 
country at the time of the discovery of America, to refer to the Alon- 
quins and the Iroquois. The Alonquins occupied the seaboard of the 
Atlantic, while the Iroquois made their home in a section of country 
farther west. Various tribes sprang from the lineage of these two, 
each adopting customs and laws distinct from the others, between 
whom a warfare to determine a supremacy was continually carried on. 
The encroachments of the white man (in the seventeenth century) on 
their territory, resulted in the formation of a confederacy of the Indi- 
ans, allying all the tribes, from the lakes to the gulf, in one "common 
bond of brotherhood," whose mutual object was protection from inva- 
sion by the intruders. King Phillip, an Alonquin, assumed control 
of the forces thus allied, and through his incursions desolation and 
terror were spread through the British Colonies of New England, 
from 1675 to 1677, when that bold and invincible warrior died. 

The Northwestern Confederacy was composed of the Kaskaskias, 
Peorias, Michigans, Cahokias, Tamaroas. Miamis and Illinois. From 
these tribes were descended the numerous other tribes which have 
figured in our later history, the most prominent of which were the 
Sacs and Foxes, who, after many hard fought and desperate battles, 
were forced to conclude a treaty of peace and retire to the country 
west of the Mississippi River. The chief of the Sacs in later days, 
(Black Hawk), who will be remembered alike for his bravery and 
eloquence, at the end of the memorable war which was known by his 
name, erected a home near the present site of DesMoines, Iowa, 
where he spent the remainder of his eventful life, engaging in agri- 
cultural pursuits, hunting and fishing. He died October 3, 1838, at 
the age of 71 years. 

During the years of French dominition the Northwest Territory 
enjoyed an era of peace, plenty and happiness. The inhabitants 



HISTORICAL SKETCHES. 7 

lived in Arcadian simplicity. Their wants were few and easily sup- 
plied from the bountiful soil and the spoils of the chase. The land 
"flowed with milk and honey;" the government was mild and paternal ; 
love of gain was almost unknown. 

The Northwest Territory embraced all that country lying north of 
the Ohio and east of the Mississippi rivers, which, at the close of the 
desperate "Seven Years' War," became a possession of Great Britain, 
the country being formally transferred to that power in July, 1765, 
when Captain Sterling, of the English army, assumed command of it. 

The Territory was under the control of the British thirteen years, 
when, on the 4th of July, 1778, (when the Revolutionary war was in 
progress), the red cross of St. George was taken from its heights and 
went down in blood, and the ''glorious emblem of liberty," so dear 
to the thirteen colonies, was unfurled to the breeze ; and the Declara- 
tion of Independence, made on that day two years before, was 
grandly fulfilled, though not until the 19th of October, 1781, was it 
proclaimed that a new nation was born — a nation that was to achieve 
wonders and perhaps become foremost in everything pertaining to a 
high order of civilization before her "rise and fall" had been recorded 
in the book of time. 

At the close of the Revolutionary war the Northwest Territory, 
under colonial rule, belonged to Virginia until 1784, when it was 
ceded by that State to the General Government of the United States. 
By appropriate acts of Congress the General Government established 
a territorial form of government, giving it the name of the North- 
western Territory, which continued until the passage of the ordinance 
of 1787. When the civil organization of the Territory was finished, 
despite critical Indian affairs, emigrants continued to come from the 
East in great numbers, until 1800, when it was deemed necessary to 
make another division of the Territory, and Indiana Territory was 
formed, of which General William H. Harrison, a native of Virginia, 
received the appointment of Governor, succeeding Arthur St. Clair, 
who was Governor of "the Territory of the United States northwest 
of the Ohio" from October 5, 1787, to July 4, 1800. 

A memorial was adopted by the Legislature of Indiana Territory, 
which, on December 28, 1815, was laid before Congress by Jonathan 
Jennings, the Territorial delegate, and which petitioned that body to 
order an election in the several counties on the first Monday in May, 
(13th), 1816, for the purpose of electing representatives to determine the 
expediency of organizing a State government. The bill was approved 
and it became a law on April 19th, 181 6. The member of the Con- 
stitutional Convention elected from Posey County was Dann Lynn, 
(his opponent being Peter Wilkerson), which completed its labors on 
June 29th, 1816; and- on August 16th, of that year, the first State 



8 HISTORICAL SKETCHES. 

election was held. When the Territory of Indiana was originally 
formed it contained, as has been previously stated, but four counties ; 
but when Indiana was admitted as a State it was composed of thirteen 
counties, viz : Wayne, Franklin, Dearborn, Switzerland, Jefferson, 
Clark, Harrison, Washington, Knox, Gibson, Warrick, Perry and 
Posey, and the county of Posey was so sparsely settled that she com- 
manded very little attention ; she was to be brought into importance 
by the continuous changing of events in human affairs. 

Posey County was named in honor of Governor Thomas Posey, a 
soldier of the Revolution, who administered upon the affairs of the 
Territory from 1813 until the time immediately preceding its admis- 
sion as a State; and who, in August, 18 16, was defeated as a candi- 
date for Governor of the State by Jonathan Jennings, the total vote 
cast being 9,145, he receiving 3,934 votes. William Hendricks was 
elected the same year to represent the State in Congress, while Daniel 
Grass, of Warrick County, was the first to represent the county of 
Posey in the State Senate, and Dann Lynn (after whom Lynn Town- 
ship was named,) was the first member of the House of the Legislature 
from Posey. 

The official returns of the population of Indiana Territory, on 
December 4, 181 5, fixed the number of inhabitants of Posey County 
at 1,619. Frederick Rappe represented Posey County, on May 22, 
1820, in conformity with provisions of acts of Congress, April 19, 
1816, and March 3, 1819, as one of ten commissioners appointed by 
the General Assembly of Indiana, who met "at the house of William 
Connor, on the west fork of White River," to "select and locate a 
quantity of land, not exceeding four sections, for a site for the per- 
manent seat of the State Government," which was done on the 7th of 
June of the same year; and the acts of the commissioners were ap- 
proved by an act of the Legislature, on January 6, 182 1, "which act 
declared that the new seat of government should be called by the 
name of Indianapolis." But it was not until January 10, 1825, that 
the seat of government was removed from Corydon, Harrison County, 
the first capital of the State, to the new and existing capital. 

While we have referred remotely to the State in general, in other 
parts of this work, we feel that that portion in which our county is 
situated should receive particular notice, though circumstances neces- 
sitate a brief reference. At this period of time, while reviewing the 
progress and development of Southern Indiana, during the past fifty 
years, our pride leads us to conclude that no section of country of the 
same area, surrounded by similar influences, could have attained the 
position which she occupies. No country can boast a greater variety 
of products, a soil of greater fertility, a climate more salubrious, a 
people endowed with greater energy, enterprise and intelligence. It 



HISTORICAL SKETCHES. 

can be stated without fear of successful contradiction, that Southern 
Indiana embraces a galaxy of counties than which no brighter con- 
stellation can be found. Of these Posey, in many respects, is superior 
to most of them; while, all things considered, she is inferior to none. 
For many years "The Pocket" was the subject of derisive remarks, 
but under the nurturing treatment of her public-spirited residents she 
has become the wonder and admiration of visitors and strangers. 
Her commercial and manufacturing interests have increased to a re- 
markable degree, her population has augmented quite rapidly, her 
cities and towns have improved in architectural and substantial wealth, 
her broad acres are intersected by railroads, while the echoes resound 
with the merry songs of the farmer boy as he drives his team afield, 
the music of the anvil, the hammer and saw, the puffiing of steam and 
the clear tones of church bells in every quarter. Monuments of 
learning, of industry and morality are seen on every hand. What 
a contrast is presented by this picture when held beside that of fifty 
years ago! It does not seem possible, even in this wonderful age of 
improvements, that such a condition could be reached within the recol- 
lection of that sage of reverential memory, the "oldest inhabitant." 
With the advantages of advancement in the mechanics and of the im- 
proved facilities for rapid and cheap transportation, what position 
must this favored section occupy ere the lapse of the coming half- 
century ? The period, though short, if we can be governed by the 
past as a criterion, must witness a greater change than imagination 
can contemplate. A writer of local reputation, in speaking of this 
section of the State, says: " Southern Indiana ! Glorious Southern 
Indiana! A land rightly taking front rank among the fairest beneath 
the sun; with a clime gentle and inviting; a land dotted with opulent 
cities and smiling villages ; a land whose fertile fields and arable 
plains can produce almost everything that can tempt the palate of 
man — certainly everything that is absolutely needful and of utility — 
a land tracked and intersected by clear, and bright, and swift rolling 
streams; with mountains and hills teeming with mineral abundance, 
which does not lie hidden far beyond the ken of man, but seemingly 
wearied of lethargy has outcropped and is now sunning its wondrous 
riches ungathered. Its geographical advantages are peerless. It 
is the choicest section of one of the most powerful States ; it is the 
pivot of the circle of that Heaven-favored valley stretching from the 
Alleghaney Mountains to the Mississippi river ; it is almost the heart 
of the American Continent." This certainly is a picture that is not 
overdrawn, for the features that are enumerated are presented in all 
the glory of their beauty in this land of great promise and this land 
of wonderful developement. The compliments that are paid are not 
exaggerated; indeed, additional statements could be made eulogizing 



IO HISTORICAL SKETCHES. 

the condition of this section, and still the actual facts would be under- 
stated. No land, not existing in fable, has called forth more encomia 
respecting its many advantages and is the possessor of a more thrifty, 
enterprising and industrious class of business men or inhabitants, 
who are more hospitable. The treasures of nature and art and the 
results of industry are so manifold, that contradiction can not be suc- 
cessfully made. The fame of Southern Indiana abroad has been grow- 
ing for several years, yet the story of her hidden wealth and developed 
richness, "as it is seen by the intelligent eye, on a liberal survey,"' 
has remained untold. What marvelous changes have indeed been 
wrought in the fleet passage of a few short years. Eighty-five years 
ago the solitude of the surrounding forests was first broken by the 
sound of the white man's voice. Seventy-five years ago the struggles 
of the pioneers with the Indians began, "when the watch dog was 
stationed sentinel in the harvest field; when the trusty fire-lock went 
as regularly to the field as the plow, when the ear of the herdsman 
was ever on the alert listening for sounds of danger and the silent 
footsteps of the stealthy foe, and when the return to his lodge at 
night was the occasion for recounting the perilous adventures of 
the day and the rendering of thanks to the Great Father of all for 
His protecting mercies." It has not been more than sixty -five 
years ago since the "winding trail led from one trading post to 
another, where some hardy adventurer had planted himself far in ad- 
vance of civilization for the purpose of traffic and gain with the native 
tribes." Previous to the year 181 1 , " the waters of our beautiful Ohio 
shimmered beneath the laughing beams of a summer's sky, bearing on 
their bosom the red man's canoe, but they turned no ponderous water- 
wheel, nor contributed aught to the comfort of civilized man. Our 
broad acres, blooming in all the loveliness of wild and uncultured 
charms, presented their virgin bosom to the sun, having wearily awaited, 
during the long lapse of ages, the fructifying hand of the husbandman. 
"Time since then, we say, has wrought many changes, not only in 
our social and domestic relations, but in the physical aspect of the 
country. The forests have been subdued, the prairies brought under 
cultivation, the rivers spanned with bridges, and on their gladsome 
breasts the ' white-winged navies ride'; cities and towns have sprung 
up in every quarter, and the sound of the mechanic's hammer, the 
rattle and whir of machinery keep quick measured time with the rum- 
bling of wheels and the clank of engines. The spire of the church 
points its mute yet suggestive finger heavenward, the school and col- 
lege meet us on every hand. Our surplus products crowd the ware- 
house and weigh down the car. We are no longer compelled to toil 
unceasingly from 'early morn to dewy eve' to procure a bare sub- 
sistence, but have time for relaxation, for mental improvement, for 



HISTORICAL SKETCHES. II 

' elegant leisure, ' while our tables groan with plenty, and we stand 
erect in every presence with a feeling of competence and independ- 
ence. These results have been achieved by no magical or supernatural 
influence; nature has not stepped aside from her beaten track to work 
these changes; no good genii have come from their hiding places to 
accomplish this task ; no enchanter's wand has bid these structures rise; 
no fabled Hercules, with giant arm, has come to the aid of our pio- 
neers. But all that is rich and beautiful around us, contributing to 
our sustenance and happiness, is the result of Labor. For the ac- 
complishment of this end, have the weary days and nights been spent ; 
for this have the strong sinews been taxed to weariness ; for this men 
have eaten the bread of carefulness." By labor and by a spirit of pub- 
lic improvement the wilderness of a few years agone has been made 
"to blossom as the rose." A great deal has been accomplished, a 
great deal will be done. The car of improvement is whirling along at 
a rapid rate, and its highway of to-day will not be known to morrow, 
so numerous will the changes be. Only a few years more and our 
"short and simple annals" will be a matter of past history. Our 
customs and our peculiarities will be commented upon and held in 
contrast with those of the coming generations, just as we have traced 
the course of people who lived in the past. We must be regarded by 
our descendents as objects of great curiosity, and it must be a matter 
of wonder to them why we did not "improve our opportunities 
and make greater advancements." No doubt the "dullards of the 
nineteenth century " will be laughed at when their bones lie buried in 
yon yawning cemetery. We shall pass to that " bourne whence no 
traveler returns" with a feeling that we have " fought a good fight/' 
and that in our age wonders unparallelled have been achieved. Im- 
provements upon our inventions will be made, and they will learn 
from us, just as we have learned from those who have gone before. 
Alas! perfection can never be attained by man. 

The beautiful river which lies at our feet was navigated by our im- 
mediate ancestors by the power of muscle ; but since then steam has 
become a motive power and the invention of machinery has displaced 
physical force. The waters from the river, converted into steam, now 
drive the vessels which float upon its bosom as "if before the wind. " 

TOPOGRAPHY, SOIL AND PRODUCTIONS OF POSEY COUNTY — POPULATION 
AND CHARACTER OF THE SAME PUBLIC IMPROVEMENTS FIRST SETT- 
LERS THE BATTLE OF TIPPECANOE AND ITS CONSEQUENCES. 

Posey County is situated in the extreme Southwestern part of the 
State of Indiana, and is bounded on the South by the Ohio river, on 
the North by the Wabash river and Gibson County, on the West by 
the Wabash river, on the East by Gibson and Vanderburgh Counties, 



12 HISTORICAL SKETCHES. 

having an area of 420 square miles, or 268,800 acres, of which, in 1880, 
there were 62,759 sown to wheat, 40,869 planted to corn, while 21,613 
acres were cultivated in oats, barley, rye, buckwheat, potatoes, melons, 
tobacco, hay, beans, berries, etc. The total valuation of taxables in 
the County, for 1881 was $7,522,620. There are probably 125,000 
acres of timber land in the County, most of which, when cleared, can 
be made very productive, and which, during coming years, will con- 
tribute largely to its revenue. The following table shows the agricultu- 
ral, horticultural and other productions of the County for 1880: 



ITEMS OF PRODUCTION. 



Wheat 

Corn 

Oats 

Barley 

Clover Seed 

Buckwheat . 

Irish Potatoes 

Sweet Potatoes 

Timothy Seed 

Clover Seed | 

Grass Seed 

Apples 



62,759 

40,869 

1,548 

U3 



Quantity. 



Peas. 

Peaches . . . 
Plums .... 
Quinces . . . 
Timothy Hay . 
Clover Hay . . 
Flax Straw . . 
Grapes. . . . 
Tobacco . . . 
Butter .... 
Maple Sugar . 
Honey .... 
Various Berries 
Cherries . . . 
Cider .... 
Vinegar . . . 
Wine .... 
Sorghum . . . 
Maple Syrup . 
Milk. . . 
E gg s 



5 

556 

J 3 



4,725 

!2,3IO 



97^746 Bush. 

.335,556 " 

15,304 " 

7,7i5 " 

2,923 " 

76 " 

20,058 " 

1,167 " 

346 " 

7,547 " 

61 " 

28,320 " 

233 " 

4,810 " 

363 " 

120 " 

1,355 Tons. 

3,526 " 

8 " 

10,420 Lbs. 

2,730 " 

153,892 " 

80 " 

12,669 " 

1,665 Gal. 

998 " 

85,039 " 

6,978 " 

1-538 " 

1,492 " 

69 " 

534,54o " 

69,343 Doz - 



HISTORICAL SKETCHES. 13 

In the consideration of the relation of topography and climate to 
the health problem for Posey County it is proper to remark that the 
County is now wholly different from the Posey County of fifty years 
ago, and deductions based on the early history of the County are of 
very little value in the discussion of the sanitary conditions of the 
present day. 

The first settlers of this County came from many of the old Slates, 
very widely separated, and brought here the heterogeneous habits and 
tastes which can be found from Vermont to South Carolina, together 
with a liberal mixture from countries beyond the ocean. These emmi- 
grants found here a soil of unsurpassed richness — a growth of vegeta- 
tion of great luxuriance — and forests of the most gigantic size. A 
large portion of the Southern and Northern part of the County was 
covered with shallow lakes in which grasses and weeds flourished 
most luxuriantly. The full streams were subject to frequent over- 
flows, and along the banks wide marshes were common. The labor 
required to convert this rich wilderness into farms and homes was very 
great, and the pioneers were necessarily an overworked race. The 
undrained marshes generated malaria by the decay of vegetation and 
thus malaria found easy access to the systems of the weary workers. 
Thus came the fever and ague of the west. But these conditions are 
now completely changed. The early settlers have passed away ; the 
dense forests have been converted into thousands of acres of farming 
lands ; the marshes have, in a great measure, been drained ; the 
streams, deprived of their lakelet reservoirs at their sources, have 
diminished in size so that overflows are confined now to narrow limits, 
and the flats have become fruitful fields. "The ax of the woodman 
carving out a home in the wilderness" has ceased to sound in the 
County ; the cabin of early days has disappeared and the privations of 
pioneer life are no longer a necessity. The new generation has come 
into possession of their rich inheritance with well-equipped farms and 
comfortable homes. The mixed population of native and foreign 
origin is rapidly becoming homogeneous in habit, and is developing 
into a hardy and energetic race. 

According to the extent of its territory, Posey County contains a 
smaller proportion of lands under cultivation than any County in the 
State, though the variety and amount of its products show either a 
better system of cultivation or a superior fertility of soil than is shown 
or contained in the other counties. The County is divided into ten 
townships, viz: Black, Harmony, Robb, Smith, Robinson, Center, 
Bethel, Lynn, Point and Marrs, the surface gently undulatiug, rich 
and productive, well adapted to the cultivation of corn, wheat, oats, 
barley, potatoes, &c, and with a salubrious and healthful climate. 
Apples, pears and grapes very seldom fail, while good crops of peaches 



14 HISTORICAL SKETCHES. 

are frequently gathered and small fruits and berries of all kinds are 
easily produced and are beginning to form an important factor in the 
commerce of the County. The County is well supplied with water for 
stock from several living streams, which run in all directions. But 
we are advancing too rapidly in the history of the County. Let us 
retrace our steps, at least in imagination, and begin with the time 
when such hardy and adventurous pioneers as Thomas Jones, William 
McFaddin, the founder of " McAaddin's Bluff," (now known as Mt. 
Vernon) Squire McFaddin, Andrew McFaddin ("Tiddle-de-dum,") an 
associate of Daniel Boone while in Missouri, '••Slim Andy" McFaddin, 
and others, whom we shall mention elsewhere, camped by the clear 
waters of our beautiful streams, sleeping under the canvas of their 
wagons, with tribes of roving savages hovering about on every side ; 
content with their "Johnny-cakes" and wild game for food and the 
" buckskin and homespun for clothing ; when the green hills were 
covered with a thousand varieties of beautiful flowers ; when the woods 
were alive with the feathered songster, the nimble squirrel and the 
graceful deer, resting on and under the limbs of the sturdy oak that had 
never heard the sound of the woodman's ax; when the buffaloand the 
antelope grazed the sunny slopes and drank the clear, sparkling water 
from the laughing brooks, without the fear of death dealing missiles 
from the hunter's rifle; let us contrast the past with the present; let 
us now take a view in reality, and pass over the well-beaten road with 
the green hedge or substantial fence on either side, and beyond view 
the green fields of the stately corn, the rustling, waving wheat and 
smooth meadow, covered with browsing cattle, sleek horses and 
bleating sheep — let us rest for a moment and consider in detail 
some of the many improvements that have sprung up, as if by magic, 
in our midst. 

POPULATION. 

In 1816 the vote of Posey County was 326, and the population 
about 2,240; in 1820 the County contained 4,061 ; in 1830, 6,540 ; in 
1840, 9,583, or nearly as many as the vote of the State in 1815, at the 
first election ; in i860, 12,549; in i860, 16,147; in 1870, 19,185; in 
1880, 22,057 inhabitants. Thus it will be seen that the settlement of 
the County has been gradual since its organization, and that the increase 
of population has chiefly come from a natural growth. The residents 
are made up principally of the German and English-speaking classes, 
most of those of African descent residing in the extreme Southern 
portion of the County. The chief portion of the Native Americans 
who settled in the County in early times came from North Carolina 
and Georgia. At present all the other States of the Union are repre- 



HISTORICAL SKETCHES. 



i-5 



sented in the population. The German element came from Wurtem- 
berg, the Western provinces of Prussia, Baden, Hesse and the Palatinate. 
The principal part of the revenue is derived from the agricultural 
interests. Its people are generous, intelligent and industrious, and 
show a disposition to improve the County, to elevate the morals, to 
educate the youth and to encourage public enterprises that is highly 
commendable. That class of people known as farmers, as a rule, are ' 
in very good circumstances, having good farms with substantial and, 
in many instances, splendid residences and outbuildings. The many 
highways which traverse every quarter of the County are kept in very 
good order, while the smiling villages and towns which dot it here and 
there bear evidences of thrift and prosperity. 

RAILROADS. 

The Railroad is a feature in transportation which has contributed 
most largely to the convenience of the public, while its presence has 
aided in the development of the country more than anything else per- 
haps. With the advantages of rapid transit offered in the railway 
system the progress of a country is assured. What a change it has 
brought about! In the "good old days of long ago," nearly all mer- 
chandise was brought from Louisville, Ky., by wagon, to Posey 
County, and it is claimed by some that this fact gave rise to the song 
"Wait for the wagon, and we'll all take a ride." In those days, too, 
merchants found it necessary to ride horseback to that city when they 
desired to buy goods, consuming from three to five weeks on the trip. 
The only means of transportation, indeed, was by horseback for several 
years. In 1850 the Evansville & Crawfordsville Railroad was built, it 
being the only road in Southern Indiana at that time. Our merchants 
availed themselves of the advantages offered by steamboats when they 
ran, but very frequently went to Evansville by stage after the comple- 
tion of the railroad and thence East over the Evansville & Crawfords- 
ville Railroad. 

In the Spring of 1881 the citizens of Smith Township voted an 
appropriation of $8,468.30 (it being two per centum of the valuation 
of taxable property) to aid the Evansville & Terre Haute Railroad in 
the construction of its line from Owensville, in Gibson County, to 
Cynthiana. Work was immediately begun and the road was completed 
soon afterward. A vote for the appropriation of $55,293.80 in Black 
and Center Townships was taken and carried in October, 1881, to aid 
that company in extending its line from Cynthiana to Mt. Vernon, of 
which Black's portion amounted to $48,102.20. 

In the Spring of 1880, the people of Robb Township voted an 
appropriation of $13,199 to aid the Peoria, Decatur & Evansville 
Railway in extending its line through that Township. 



1 6 HISTORICAL SKETCHES. 

In the spring of 1881, an appropriation of $16,000 was voted by 
the residents of Harmony Township to that road to aid its extension 
from Posey ville to New Harmony. The work was begun in the sum- 
mer of that year and completed in the month of December following. 

Besides these lines of railway, there is another crossing the South- 
ern portion of the County, now known as the Louisville & Nashville 
Railroad, an account of which will be found under the sketch of Mt. 
Vernon. The probability is, that the extension of the E. & T. H. R. 
R., from Cynthiana to Mt. Vernon, will be completed before the 
Summer of 1882, while it is confidently anticipated that the P., D. & 
E. Company will finally extend its line from New Harmony to the 
county seat. At present there are fifty miles of railway in the County, 
represented as follows: L. & N., twenty miles; P., D. & E., twenty- 
four miles, and the E. & T. H., six miles, exclusive of switches. 

It would seem from the present outlook that Posey County is des- 
tined to be a formidable rival of Vanderburgh. Indeed, it is not hard 
to understand how the former could outstrip the latter in the race for 
commercial and manufacturing honors, possessing as she does, supe- 
rior advantages for the development of these interests, which have 
been enumerated elsewhere in these pages. 

Thus it will be seen that the County is afforded, in addition to the 
Ohio and Wabash rivers, excellent facilities for the tranportation of 
its products and trade. Its people have direct communication by rail 
and telegraph, with the whole "outside world," and when the fact 
becomes known that its supply of timber is very great and of a supe- 
rior quality, its manufacturing interests must be rapidly developed. 

MANUFACTURING FACILITIES AND RESULTS. 

Fuel is cheap, its geographical position is recognized as fovorable 
and its close proximity to the iron fields of the Cumberland and Mis- 
souri and the vast deposits of lead in Southern Illinois must contribute 
very largely in the near future to the material growth of the County. 
These are facts that cannot be overlooked when capital starts on its 
pilgrimage of investment — they are invitations which cannot be 
ignored. Why. then, have we not reason to believe that the era 
marking the dawn of the coming century will be laden with the golden 
fruit of a remarkable and permanent development? What reason have 
we to doubt the assertion of Ceneral Alvin P. Hovey that, "when her 
agricultural capacity is fully developed, Posey County can maintain a 
vast number of agricultural inhabitants ?" But to return again to the 
early periods of the County: 

About the year 1792, nineteen years before the waters of the 
beautiful and majestic Ohio were disturbed by the action of machinery 



HISTORICAL SKETCHES. I 7 

driven by the power of steam, Thomas Tones, a native of Ireland, left 
Pittsburgh with a fleet of perogues laden with merchandise. He had 
no particular place of destination in view, though he contemplated 
locating somewhere in what is now known as Southern Indiana. He 
had heard some of the French Soldiers who were garrisoned at Vin- 
cennes while on a visit to Pittsburgh, say that favorable opportunities 
were offered to anyone who had the courage and the enterprise to 
establish a trading post in the neighborhood of the fort, and he 
determined to profit by the suggestion of the soldiers. He selected 
his stock in trade, consisting of blankets and whiskey principally, and 
set out at once upon his lonesome and perilous voyage, accompanied 
by two men. They reached a point just below the present city of 
Madison, where they discharged their cargo; and, with horses obtained 
from the pioneers in that section, removed it to a point on the Wabash 
river, a few miles below the town now known as Mt. Carmel, Illinois. 
Here he constructed a log hut and was soon enjoying an excellent trade 
with the Indians. He remained at this place two years when he con- 
cluded to remove his place of business and residence to the region 
at the mouth of the Wabash river, having learned from parties who 
went to the ' 'Saline country" for salt that it would be a more desirable 
place for him to locate. In the Fall of 1794 he reached the mouth of 
that classic stream, where he and two men, whom he had employed 
to assist him in removing his stock, constructed a small log house, 
and where he soon found customers among the various tribes of roving 
Indians and the white settlers who lived near where Shawneetown, 
Illinois, now is. In a small publication entitled The Navigator, 
issued in 181 7, the author, in speaking of the country lying contiguous 
to the confluence of the Wabash with the Ohio river, says; "Here is 
seen a cabin above the mouth of the river, the remnant of a trading 
establishment here some years ago, but the waters proving detrimental 
it was abandoned". The "trading establishment" referred to was the 
one which Thomas Jones and his companions constructed. As nearly 
as can be ascertained, the "establishment" was "abandoned" about 
the year 1808. When Mr. Jones located at the mouth of the Wabash 
a dense forest covered the entire county of Posey, at that time a part 
of Knox County. Inquiries and research have failed to elicit any 
information which would establish the opinion that- Thomas Jones was 
not the first white settler, and for that reason it is safe to say that he 
is entitled to the honor of being the first white resident of Posey County. 

THE PIONEERS OF INDIANA.* 

"And now let us glance at the pioneers of Indiana in the different 
phases of their experience, and in the beauty and simplicity of their 

*From the History of Indiana, by Dewitt C Goodrich and Charles R. Tuttle— 1875. 



IS HISTORICAL SCETCHES. 

character. The journey from civilization to the forest-home was not 
among the least of their difficulties. The route lay, for the most part, 
through a rough county. Swamps and marshes were crossed with 
great exertion and fatigue; rivers were forded with difficulty and 
danger; forests were penetrated with risk of captivity by hostile 
Indians; nights were passed in open prairies, with the sod for a couch 
and the heavens for a shelter ; long weary days and weeks of tiresome 
travel were endured. Perchance the mother and child were seated in 
a rough farm wagon, urging them over the uneven ground. But they 
were not always blessed with this means of transportation. And, in 
the best cases, the journey westward was a tedious, tiresome, danger- 
ous one. Often the children sickened by the way, and anxious 
parents worried over them in a rude camp, until relieved either by 
returning health or by death. If the latter, a father would be com- 
pelled to dig the grave for the body of his only child in a lonely forest. 
Who shall describe the burial-scene when parents are the only mourners ? 
This is a subject only for contemplation. After a few sad days, the 
bereaved ones take up the journey, leavmg only a little fresh mound 
to mark the sacred spot. 

But these incidents were not frequent. Generally the pioneers 
were blessed with good health, and enabled to overcome the privations 
of the forest-travel. At night they slept in their wagons, or upon the 
grass; while the mules, hobbled to prevent escape, grazed the prairie 
around them. But the toils and dangers of the pioneer were not 
ended with the termination of his journey. Perchance the cabin is 
yet existing only in the surrounding trees. But he never falters. The 
forest bows beneath his ax ; and, as log after log is placed one upon 
the other, his situation becomes more cheerful. Already the anxious 
mother has pointed out the corner for the rude chimney, and designated 
her choice in the location of the door and window. The cabin grows 
day by day ; and at length it is finished, and the family enter their 
home. It is not a model home ; but it is the beginning of a great 
prosperity, and as such is worthy of preservation in history, on account 
of its obscurity and its severe economy. But it was a home, notwith- 
standing ; and I venture the observation, that with all its lack of com- 
forts, with all its pinching poverty, with all its isolation and danger, it 
was often a happy home ; and perhaps its growth, in this respect, is 
not among the greatest of its accomplishments; yet after all, it has 
become happier, as well as wealthier. 

Next to building the cabin-home came the work of preparing the 
soil for agricultural purposes. This was a work of no ordinary mag- 
nitude. For miles in every direction, the eye of the pioneer met only 
a dense forest, broken here and there by rivers and creeks and small 
lakes. Dams must be constructed; and mills erected on these streams ; 



HISTORICAL SKETCHES. I 9 

and the forest must be cleared away to make room for the cornfield. 
For the accomplishment of these ends, the pioneer prepared his axe, 
and day after day he toils on. Tree after tree bows its lofty top. Log 
after log is rolled into the stream. Through many a long, dreary 
winter has the early settler pursued these elementary branches of in- 
dustry. Oft has he eaten a cold dinner in a stormy winter's day, with 
only a log to serve the double purpose of a chair and table ; but, 
endowed with a spirit of enterprise that knows no faltering, he toiled 
steadily on. 

Spring comes, and he goes forth to prepare the patch of ground for 
the planter. The team is ready. The father takes his post at the plow; 
and the daughter takes possession of the reins. This is a grand scene, 
— one full of grace and beauty. This pioneer girl thinks but little of 
fine dress; knows less of the fashions; has possibly heard of the opera, 
but does not understand its meaning; has been told of the piano, but 
has never seen one ; wears a dress 'buttoned up behind' ; has on leather 
boots, and 'drives plow' for her father. But her situation has changed. 
To-day she sits in the parlor of her grandson, whose wife keeps house 
through the proxy of one or two servants, and whose daughters are 
flinging their nimble, delicate fingers over the white keys of a charming 
Chickering piano, filling the home with a melody that has but few 
charms for the plain old grandmother. Her mind runs back to the 
cornfield, to the cabin home, to the wash-tub by the running brook, 
to the spinning-wheel, to toil and danger: and well may she exclaim, 
'Oh, wondrous progress ! my life is but a dream'. Truly, our pioneer 
mothers were hard-working, honest-thinkingwomen. Our highest 
praise is a poor tribute to their worth. 

The character of the pioneers of Indiana is properly within our 
range. They lived in a region of exuberant fertility, where nature had 
scattered her blessings with a liberal hand. Their liberties, the vast- 
ness of their inheritance, — its giant forests, its broad prairies, its 
numerous rivers, — the many improvements constantly going forward, 
and the bright prospect for a glorious future in every thing that renders 
life pleasant combined to deeply impress their character to give them 
a spirit of enterprise, and independence of feeling, and a joyousness 
of hope. * * * 

The rough, sturdy and simple habits of the early pioneer of 
Indiana, living in that plenty which depends upon God and nature, have 
laid broad the foundation of independent thought and feeling. The 
wedding was an attractive feature of pioneer life. For a long time after 
the settlement of the Territory, the people married young. There was 
no distinction of rank, and very little of fortune. On these accounts, 
the first impressions of love generally resulted in marriage. The family 
establishment cost but little labor — nothing more. A description of 



20 HISTORICAL SKETCHES. 

a wedding in the olden time will serve to show the progress made in 
society, as well as preserve an important phase in history. The 
marriage was always celebrated at the house of the bride ; and she 
was generally left to choose the clergyman. A wedding, however, 
engaged the attention of the whole neighborhood. It was anticipated 
by both old and young with eager expectation. In the morning of the 
wedding day the groom and his intimate friends assembled at the house 
of his father, and, after due preparation, departed enmasse for the 
'mansion' of his bride. The journey was sometimes made on horseback, 
sometimes on foot and sometimes in farm wagons or in carts. It was al- 
ways a merry journey, and, to insure merriment, the bottle was taken 
along. On reaching the house of the bride the marriage ceremony took 
place; and then dinner or supper was served. After the meal, the dancing 
commenced, and generally lasted till the following morning. The 
figures of dances were three or four-handed reels, or square sets and 
jigs. The commencement was always a square four, which was fol- 
lowed by what the pioneers called 'jigging', that is, two of the four 
would single out for a jig and were followed by the main couple. The 
jigs were often accompanied with what was called 'cutting out' ; that 
is, when either of the parties became tired of the dance, on intimation, 
the place was supplied by some one of the company, without interrup- 
tion of the dance. In this way the reel was continued until the 
musician was exhausted." 

THE FIRST SETTLERS IN POSEY COUNTY. 

When the post at the mouth of the Wabash river was abandoned 
by the French, (1763,) the control of the county passed wholly into 
the hands of the Indians, who maintained virtual supremacy until 
181 o. The first white man who settled in the county after the final 
treaty between England and France, was an Irishman, as has been 
stated, by the name of Thomas Jones, who, doubtless to strengthen 
the confidence of the aboriginees, was wedded to one of their squaws 
according to the usages of the tribes. The exact period of his ad- 
vent cannot be ascertained, though it is generally supposed by those 
who knew him, that it was in the year 1794, and it was from him 
that the necessaries and " luxuries " of life were obtained, as he was 
the proprietor of the only place of trade, which increased very rapid- 
ly when the tide of settlers, soon afterwards, turned its course to this 
very remote frontier country. He continued in business until the 
year of his death, which was in 1826. His place of business was lo- 
cated on the banks of the Wabash, near the mound called "bone 
bank," and during his lifetime he held a vast number of acres of land 
bounding the Ohio river from Pittsburgh to the Wabash, which he ac- 



HISTORICAL SKETCHES. 21 

quired through his dealings with the red men. In speaking of this 
adventurous, but enterprising Irishman, Gen. Hovey, in his historical 
sketch of Posey County, published in 1876, says: "Nearly all of his 
supplies, when he first arrived, were obtained at what was known as 
the 'Old Fort,' ' Fort St. Vincennes,' now the city of Vincennes, Ind., 
or in perogues from Pittsburgh. Several cargoes of salt were sent to 
Jones, and taken over the l trail ' to Vincennes. Salt was also brought 
from the "Saline,' in Gallatin County, Illinois. Jones made several 
trips to Pittsburgh on horseback, returning with his perogues laden 
with stores. There is an Indian trail or road still visible, where the 
hands have not destroyed it, leading from Vincennes to the mouth of 
the Wabash and Shawneetown, Ills. An anecdote was for many 
years current among the settlers as to Jones' manner of dealing with 
the Indians. He sold them beads, tobacco, whisky, blankets and 
other small articles for their peltries and whatever they desired to bar- 
ter. He had a rude pair of scales but no weights, and when he pur- 
chased from the Indians he would place his hand in the scales, which, 
he said, would weigh one pound — both hands, with the force he 
thought proper to use, two pounds. With this his customers were 
content, but when Tom made three barrels of whisky out of one, it 
was a little too much for the red man. The Indian, after emptying 
his gourd of fire-water in two or three swallows, would say, ' Waugh ! 
Tom, whisky muchee Wabosh !' " The same writer, elsewhere in his 
sketch says : " The hardy and brave pioneers who settled in these 
Western wilds deserve a glowing page in the history of the county. 
The women themselves were often compelled to battle with the savages 
who surrounded them. Polly McFaddin, whilst in a blockhouse with 
other women and their children, shot an Indian who was in the act of 
stealing the horses in the corral. She lived in this county many years, 
and died at an advanced age, leaving Wm. Hendricks and his sisters, 
Mrs. Martin Pritchett and Mrs. John Patterson, as her survivors." 
These three are still living. 

Besides those whom we have enumerated in a preceding page, and 
who settled in the county, while Indiana was a territory, there were 
John, Roley and Aaron Burlison, Aaron Williams, William Wear and 
his sons, John and James, (who came in 1806,) Cornelius Bradley, 
(who was a revolutionary soldier and whose wife, while they, with 
others, were moving to one of the blockhouses in Kentucky, was 
scalped by the Indians and left for dead, but she recovered, went to 
the blockhouse, two miles away, and afterwards bore and raised 
Hiram, John and David Bradley, who have since died, but have left 
offspring,) Rev. Samuel Jones, (honored as being known as the first 
Christian minister) ; Absolom Duckworth, John Duckworth, called 
"Particular John," because he was very punctilious in everything, 



22 HISTORICAL SKETCHES. 

James Duckworth, (Major,) Paul and Samuel Marrs, Jesse Y. and 
Wm. W. Welborn, Paul and Thomas Casselberry, James and Jacob 
Winemiller, Wm. Todd, Hugh Todd, James Black, Ezekiel Black, 
Samuel Black, Wm. Black, Thomas Black, John Black, John 
Dixon, Samuel Dixon, Robert Dixon, Aaron John, James and 
Barton Moore, John Greathouse, (father of Sampson and L. D.,) 
John, Christopher and Nathan Ashworth, Wm. Downen, James and 
Wm. Stewart, Robert Berger, (who was a substitute for James Black 
in the battle of Tippecanoe,) Stephen Hendrix, Johnathan Robinson, 
the Byrds, John Carson, (first sheriff of the county,) Aaron Bacon, 
Zahab Parkhurst, John Ridenhour (who came to the county in 1811, 
who is now eighty-four years of age and who is living near New Haven, 
Ills,) Yelverton and Wm. Finch, Wm. Curtis, the Hendersons, Robert 
Jeffries, Reese Knowles, David Mills, Fitldon N. Mills, Felix Mills, 
Hugh Allison, James P. Drake, Nathan and Edmond Blount, Wm. 
Kincheloe, Samuel, John, Ezekiel and Reuben Aldridge, (who enter- 
ed homesteads in 18 10,) Samuel, Shubal and Eli York, James 
Thomas, (father of George W. Thomas, Esq., of Mt. Vernon,) and 
Thomas and Wm. Goad. These occupied the southern portion of the 
county, residing in Marrs and Black Townships. "Slim" Andy McFad- 
din made himself famous by firing the first gun at the battle of Tip- 
pecanoe, fought on the 8th of November, 181 1; and i( Tiddle-de- 
dum " McFaddin, notwithstanding exposure and privations, became a 
centenarian before he died. He acquired his nickname through the 
fact that, when alone, he was incessantly repeating those words, sup- 
posed to have been a part of a song. The Stallings, Dann Lynn, the 
Wilsons, Wm., Thomas and Turner Nelson, John and William Graddy, 
Elias Altizer, Thomas and Alexander Hindman, the Wiggins' Wm. 
Macadoo, James and Jacob Taylor, Thompson and Robert Randolph," 
John Schnee, John Crunk, Matthews', Rogers', Greshams', Pitts', 
Thomas Owens, Josiah Elkins, Henry Coburn, John Dunbar, Seth 
Hargraves, Joseph Spaulding and David Love, located in the center 
part of the county previous to 1816, that part embracing Lynn, Cen- 
ter and Robb townships as they now exist. 

George Rapp, founder of the town of Harmonie (now known as 
New Harmony), and associates, Wm., David, James andThomas Robb, 
sen., (after whom Robb township was named), Nathaniel Ewing, John 
P. Phillips, Leander Defur (the last three being the first to enter in that 
part of the county), Joshua Overton, James Anderson, Eliacum An- 
derson, Simon Reeter, Benjamin Venable, Langston, Drew, Phil- 
lip Amech, Robert Downey, Joseph Price, Gillison Price, Samuel 
and James Murphy, Wm. Hunter, Peter Jones, Abner Coates, Vicissi- 
mus K. Phar, John McReynolds, Wm. and Robert Smith, the Hords, 
the Leavitts, Thomas Alman and Adam Fisher (both of whom received 



HISTORICAL SKETCHES. 23 

wounds at the battle of Tippecanoe), Isaac Rogers, John Waller, John 
Wallace, John Cox (known as "double-head" because of the peculiar 
formation of his craneum), Thomas Rogers, Max Jolley, Samuel James, 
(who entered land in 1813), John and Peter Shivers, Arthur Durley, 
Wm. Casey, Jas. Carter, Thomas Cavitt, Benjamin Carter, Jas. Calvin, 
Reddick Cartwight (now living in Cole County, Ills., aged 82 years), 
the Fitzgeralds, Enoch R. James, (born in the County, July 4, 1800, 
was appointed a constable when only 18 years of age, who, in later 
years, became a banker in Mt Vernon, where he died August 4, 1863, 
and who during the war of the Rebellion was Colonel of the First In- 
diana Legion, a regiment of militia organized for home protection), 
Isaac James, Ezekiel Kight, Thomas Kight, and Wm. James, who 
served from 1831 to 1845 as Sheriff of the County. These were the 
original settlers of the Northern portion of the county, embracing 
Smith, Robb and Harmony Townships as they are now bounded. A 
great many of the persons named in the foregoing list were in the 
county before the close of the Eighteenth century, a number of whom 
lived to see the termination of the late civil war and to rejoice over 
the defeat of the conspiracy to overthrow the magnificent institutions 
of the grandest and most permanent Republic the world has ever had. 
In speaking of one of the above list, General Hovey has this to say : 
"James Duckworth was Ensign in Captain Warrick's Company, in the 
battle of Tippecanoe. The gallant Captain, with his Lieutenants, 
was soon numbered with the slain, and one of the aides of General 
Harrison, riding up to their position, enquired who was in command 
ot their company and was informed that their officers had all fallen. 
'Who is the next in command?' The young ensign, stepping forward, 
answered for them. The command was soon given for a charge, and 
the young officer, being placed in a new position, and not exactly 
understanding military language, shouted at the top of his voice, 
'Come, boys, let's give 'em h — 11,' and they did something very much 
like it. The ensign, on his return home, was soon promoted and be- 
came Major of the militia, which, in those days, meant a little more 
than Sunday drill. The Major died a few years ago, surrounded by 
a large family and relatives, and was respected and mourned by all 
who knew him." In his letter to the Secretary of War, written ten 
days after the battle described, Govenor Harrison corroborates the 
above statement by declaring that "nineteen-twenthieths" of his 
soldiers "had never been in action before, but who behaved in a man- 
ner that can never be too much applauded." Thomas Alman, who, 
as previously stated, received a wound at that engagement, is still a 
resident of the County and is now in the 93rd year of his age. 
Ezekiel Kight, at the same battle, was made famous by the fact that 
fourteen balls passed through his coat, which is regarded as a great 



24 HISTORICAL SKETCHES. 

curiosity and which is still kept as a memento of the event by his 
descendants, who live near Stewartsville. There were thirteen others 
from Posey County in the battle of Tippecanoe, besides those named, 
among whom were Wra. Todd, Hugh Todd and John Black, who 
received a mortal wound in the head, the ball passing through a wool- 
en hat he wore, which was brought back by his comrades, and which 
was worn by his mother until her death, several years afterward, in 
respect to his memory. They equipped themselves at their own ex- 
pense and marched to Post Vincennes, where they joined the Militia, 
who were reinforced by the Fourth regiment of United States infantry, 
commanded by Col. John P. Boyd. From Post Vincennes these 
forces took up their march on September 26th, 181 1, and on October 
3rd, reached the present site of Terre Haute, where they constructed 
a fort, finishing it October 28th, which they named Fort Harrison. 
On the day following the troops resumed their march and on Novem- 
ber 6th, reached the battle-ground, which lies seven miles in a north- 
easterly direction from the present city of Lafayette. On November 
17th, the troops were discharged at Bosseron Creek, near Vincennes, 
and those who were able to do so returned to their homes, where, for 
many winter evenings, while sitting by the glowing fire in the old 
fashioned chimney place, the stories of their experiences were listened 
to with manifest interest, and the trophies they gathered and brought 
home were objects of great curiosity. Thomas Givens, (who was 
wounded in that engagement.) Robert Jeffries, (who died in 1876,) 
Thomas Duckworth, (who died in 1877) and Timothy Downey, (who 
came to Posey County in 1807,) were also at the conflict with the 
Indians at Tippecanoe. The last named gentleman was killed, in 
1828. by a runaway horse, and was a brother of David, Judge, Josiah 
and job Downey, all of whom came to the County with him. 

COURTS OF THE COUNTY. 

THE FIRST COURTS AND THE FIRST JUDGES THE FIRST GRAND JURY AND 

PROSECUTOR THE LOCATION AND REMOVAL OF THE COUNTY SEATS 

THE OLD AND NEW COURT HOUSES — THEIR COST OF CON- 
STRUCTION THE FIRST PRISONER TROUBLE WITH FAMILIES 

— THE FIRST SECRET SOCIETY — A PERILOUS PREDICAMENT. 

The house of Absalom Duckworth, about five miles North of Mt. 
Vernon, was where the first Court in the County convened, which 
was on the 20th day of March, 18 15, over which Isaac Blackford, 
with Thos. E. Casselberry and Dann Lynn, associates, presided.. The 
first panel of grand jurors was composed of Na.haniel Munsey, Win. 
Wagnon v Jas. Robertson, Wilson Butler, Alexander Mills, John Staple- 



HISTORICAL SKETCHES. 25 

ton, Adam Albright, John Aldredge, Samuel Aldredge, James Black, 
Seth Hargrave, Ezekiel Jones, John B. Stephenson, David Thomas, 
John Crunk, Mathew Adams, Peter Wilkeson, Wm . Boid and Wm. 
Barton, the last three named failing to serve, for which they were fined, 
but when they gave satisfactory reasons for their absence, the fines 
were remitted. Wm. Prince, on the day the court convened, was 
appointed prosecuting Attorney, a position he held until 1817, when 
he was elected as Judge, succeeding David Raymond, who was the 
second Judge of the circuit court held in Posey County. Davis Floyd 
succeeded Wm. Prince as prosecutor. 

On the 2 1 st of October, 18 16, the first Court under the State law 
convened at the town of Blackford, which remained the county seat 
until May 20th, 181 7, when the Board of Commissioners, composed of 
Samuel Marrs, Thomas Robb and Abner Coates, formally ordered 
that it be removed to and be "known and designated by the name 
and style of Springfield." This order took effect, after Isaac Mont- 
gomery, Hugh McGary, Adam Hope and John Brazelton, Commis- 
sioners appointed by an act of the Legislature to fix a permanent seat 
of justice of Posey County, met at the house of Elias Altizer, on 
Febuary 22, 1817, and, "after being first sworn, proceeded to examine 
and explore the said countv in different directions, and received pro- 
posals in donations in land from different persons, and having maturely 
considered their several advantages and situation, together with the 
extent of the county, the advantages of the soil, the weight of the 
present as well as the prospect of future population and future divi- 
sions, selected one hundred acres of land^ a donation made by Fred- 
erick Rappe, on which to fix the permanent seat of justice for said 
county, it being the Southeast quarter of section thirty-three, in town- 
ship five, range thirteen West, lying on the South side of said quarter 
section from corner to corner of the same, it being near the center (of the 
county) and an eligible situation for a town." Rappe, for the fulfillment 
of his promises to "make or cause to be made a good and sufficient title 
to said land" was "held and firmly bound unto John Carson, Sheriff 
of said County, or his successor in office, as agent of said County, 
in twenty thousand dollars good and lawful money of the United 
States." Springfield remained the "permanent seat of justice" until 
June 10, 1825, when it was again removed to Mt. Vernon, such trans- 
fer being allowed by law on condition that the payment of amounts of 
damages sustained by the consequent depreciation of real property be 
made by the residents of the County. The aggregate amount of 
damages paid on these terms was $1,313. Mt. Vernon is still the 
county seat, where, in 1876, a handsome temple of justice was erected 
by James C. Norris, contractor, Vrydaugh & Clarke, architects. 

The building is 105 feet in length from north to south and 75 feet 



26 HISTORICAL SKETCHES. 

from east to west. The base of the building is built of stone brought 
from Bedford, Ind. , while the cappings and sills used in ornamenting 
the windows and doors are from the same locality. The first story 
contains the county offices, is made entirely fire proof by the use of 
incombustible materials and rests upon a system of arches which afford 
it a most substantial foundation. The court room is located on the 
second floor and is reached by two flights of stairs. The room is in 
the form of an eliptical circle, with a gallery surrounding its entire 
extent. Its accoustic properties are said to be perfect. The building 
is of the Romanesque style of architecture, its roof being covered with 
slate and copper and surmounted by a handsome dome, whose apex 
reaches 119 feet above the foundation. The chances of destruction 
by fire from the outside are lessened by the use of Clarke's patent self- 
coiling steel shutters, a feature that renders the use of vaults for the 
records unnecessary. Genl. Hovey had the honor of laying the first 
brick, a feat performed on the 30th day of May, 1874, at 2:30 p. m. 
The building was completed January 1 ,1876. Including the iron fence 
which encloses the square, the cost to the county was nearly $95,000, 
a sum which was considered remarkably low, and which, of course, 
gave universal satisfaction to the tax payers of the County. 

In 1877 the contract for the jail and residence of the jailor was 
let, and in 1878 the building was completed, at a cost of $17,000. 
The prison is built of heavy limestone, and the roof is composed of 
iron and slate. There are fourteen cells, separated into five wards, 
the doors being made of grated prison iron and they are made secure 
by the celebrated patent May lever locks, the levers all terminating at 
the main entrance to the prison from which place they are operated, 
thus securing the jailor from any surprises. The prismatic plates used 
for admitting light obstruct the vision from either side. The front of 
the building, intended as a residence for the Sheriff, is of brick, sur- 
mounted by a mansard roof. Well might a captive, doomed by the 
majesty of the law to be confined within its walls, say: "He leaves hope 
behind who enters here!'" The Court House at Blackford was a small 
one built of logs, and the benches were of very rude construction, while 
the jail, built by Samuel Jones at a cost of $422, was constructed of 
the same material. Prisoners were guarded by sentinels paid by the 
county. The first prisoner confined in that primitive jail was a man 
by the name of Edward C. Fitzgerald, arrested on the charge of larceny. 
Abner Coates, for $458, built the jail, a log structure, and Frederick 
Rappe, James Carter and others contstructed the Court House, a brick 
building, at Springfield, the cost of which was $3,472. Joseph Spauld- 
ing furnished the brick, James Carter the lumber, Elias Altizer the 
lime, Wm. Rogers the hardware, Charles Vandever the sand and rock, 
for the foundation, and Peter Saltzman was superintendent of the con- 



HISTORICAL SKETCHES. 27 

str action, at $1 per day. The well was dug by John Hinch, for which 
he was paid the sum of $25. On August 15th, 181 7, Thomas E. 
Casselberry was allowed the sum of "seven dollars for whisky furnished 
at the sale of town lots in Springfield". The Court House at Spring- 
field was 40 feet square, two stories high, with a foundation of stone 
two feet thick and three feet high. The contract for building the 
structure was let on Monday, March 2, 181 9, to Frederick Rappe, a 
mason by trade, who sublet the work to other parties, and it was ready 
for occupancy about the close of the same year. It would be inferred 
by the following order of the county commisioners that the original 
contractors failed to complete their work: "Ordered that the contract 
for completing the Court House at Springfield be let to David Love, 
the work including a plank loft and plank door; chimney to be chinked 
inside and daubed on the outside with clay mortar." 

Nathaniel Huntington was the first attorney admitted to practice 
and the only one in 18 17. The following oath was administered to 
attorneys and other persons at that time and for several years after- 
ward ; "I swear I will do no falsehood, nor counsel to the doing of 
any in the courts of justice, and if I know of any attempt to commit 
any, I will give knowledge thereof to courts that it may be prevented. 
I will not willingly promote, or see any false, groundless or unlawful 
suit, nor give aid nor counsel to the same". 

The first Court House built in Mt. Vernon was an unpretentious 
brick 40 feet square, surmounted by a very modest cupola, the narrow 
cornice being ornamented with wooden balls, though it seems to have 
been not too humble for occupancy by "families", as it was ordered 
by the Board of Justices, at a meeting of that body in January, 1830, 
that "Wm. E. Stewart (county clerk) be and he is now and from this 
time put into full possession of the Court House; and it is also his duty 
to prevent all families from living in the same from this time out ; and 
if any family should accidentally get possession of the Court House, it 
is his duty to have them put out." At the same term of that Court 
the motion was made and it was ordered that the Sheriff (Felix Mills) 
be authorized and directed to proceed immediately, with force, if 
necessary, and clear the Court House of all families whatever." The 
offices were isolated, being in various quarters of the town, while the 
jail was a log building in the rear of the Court House. It was in the 
dome of the first Court House where the meetings of the fraternity of 
Masons were originally held, and it was here where conviviality was 
encouraged until their midnight orgies became a source of terror to the 
grand lodge of the State, and, fearing the disclosures of the secrets 
mightfbe made to some "outsider", the Charter was accordingly revok- 
ed. John Barter, who died in Mt. Vernon in 1870, and who had 
charge of the "jewels" belonging to the lodge, refused to surrender 



28 HISTORICAL SKETCHES. 

them when demanded by that body, hoping to be able, by their pos- 
session, to establish another lodge, which occured a few years after- 
wards. The name of the first lodge was "Philanthropic, No. 36, F. 
and A. Y. M.," was organized in 1829 and received its Charter De 
cember 29, of the same year. The following were the charter mem- 
bers : John T. Cook, John Carson, Aaron Bacon, John Knight, Daniel 
R. Jacobs, William Barter, James Alvey, R. Daniel, Lionel James 
Larkin, J. W. Swift and Lewis Circles. The first officers were : Lionel 
James Larkin, W. M. ; John Carson, S. W. ; John Knight, J . W. The 
Charter was revoked March 12, 1835. The "jewels" referred to above 
are used by the Masons of Mt. Vernon at this time. 

The law in the early days required three judges to preside over 
the court, the chief and two associate Judges, who generally were men 
of very limited knowledge of the law, but selected because of their 
disposition to be impartial in their decisions and because of their 
established reputation for honest dealing with their fellow men. It 
was their duty to convene and adjourn court and to hear, in the 
absence of the Chief Justice, cases of little importance. Their lack of 
knowledge of the law and their ignorance of technical phrases very 
often led to ludicrous situations and awkward blunders. 

The salaries of the officers of the law in those primitive days were 
not very large, as the judges of the Circuit Court received but $2.00 
per day, the salary of the Prosecutor was $100 per year, the assessor 
was paid, in 1816, $42.50 for assessing all the taxable property of the 
county, the county clerk was allowed $23.50 for the year 181 6 and 
the Treasurer received $50.00 for his services for the year ending De- 
cember, 1 81 6. 

The Hon. Isaac Blackford, the first Judge of the county and who was 
appointed, as successor to John Johnson, Judge of the Supreme Court, 
of Indiana, December 10th, 1817. holding until January 3d. 1853, 
related that the following occurrence actually happened in this county 
in the territorial days. We give it in the language of General Hovey : 
"He was holding court at the then town of Blackford, (now a farm), 
when a man was arraigned and tried for stealing a horse. After a 
defense by Richard Daniels, one of the ablest and most eloquent 
lawyers of that time in the territory, the jury returned a verdict of 
guilty against the prisoner, and that he receive forty-nine lashes at the 
whipping post, on his bare back. Daniels, for his client, moved the 
Court for a new trial, and the Court adjourned for dinner. During the 
repast, John Carson, then Sheriff of the county, took the culprit to the 
post and vigorously administered the forty-nine lashes. Upon the 
meeting of the court after dinner, Daniels arose and commenced an 
argument for a new trial, when the prisoner with great excitement 
pulled him down by the coat, saying in a mournful voice: "For God's 



HISTORICAL SKETCHES. 29 

sake, Dick, do stop, I've got enough already !" This was in the spirit 
of our present constitution, which provides that 'justice shall be ad- 
ministered freely without price, speedily without delay.' " 

The County agent, Thos. E. Casselberry, was authorized by the 
Commissioners to sell lots in the town of Springfield May 17th, 181 7, 
the lots to be sold on the following terms and conditions: "Each lot 
joining the Public Square to be set up at $100; all lots fronting on 
Main street to be set up at $20 each ; all lots fronting on the back 
streets to be set up at $12 each, and all out-lots at the rate of $10 per 
acre each, on the following terms, to-wit: the purchase money to be 
paid in three installments, six, twelve and eighteen months credit, or 
one-third each payment, the purchaser giving bond and approved 
security at the time of sale, at which time the agent shall make a good 
and sufficient title to the party or parties, paying the expenses of the 
same." It was also ordered that "any person bidding off a lot in the 
town of Springfield and not complying with the articles of sale shall 
forfeit the sum of ten dollars to the use of the county." 

Regular terms of the Circuit Court now convene on the fourth Mon- 
days of January, April and August. The Commissioners meet regularly 
on the first Monday in the months of March, June, September and De- 
cember, and also on the first Monday after the second Tuesday in 
October, for the purpose of receiving the reports of the Township 
Trustees and disposing of business entirely relating to the duties of 
those officials. 

The first terms of the Commissioner's Court were held at the house 
of Wm. E. Hutcheson, in Marrs Township, near the former site of the 
town of Blackford. 

A BELLIGERENT LAWYER AND THE JUDGE OF 1 834, 

On the 8th of March, 1834, the indignation of the members of the 
bar of the county was aroused by an act of one of the legal fraternity, 
and as a result the following document was written and placed upon 
the records of the court : 

"The undersigned members of the bar of the Posey Circuit Court, 
feeling highly indignant at what they consider a most flagrant outrage 
upon every principle of order and decorum, as well as individual 
rights, in the late conduct of J. R. E. Goodlett, one of the members 
of said bar, ask leave to express their abhorrence of such conduct by 
spreading the following resolution upon the memorials of this court : 
Resolved, that the attack by James R. E. Goodlett, a member of the 
bar of the Posey Circuit Court, last evening, upon the Hon. Samuel 
Hall, while on the bench and in the faithful and impartial discharge of 
his duty as a judge, and a repetition of the same offence this morning, 



30 HISTORICAL SKETCHES. 

is, in their opinion, without parallel in the history of our judicial pro- 
ceedings ; and for the honor of our country, our social, judicial and 
political institutions, they hope such may never occur again. They 
more regret the circumstance from the elevated station which the 
offender has held in the community, and deem it their duty thus to 
express their abhorrence and indignation at such conduct. [Signed] 
Amos Clark, E. Embree, E. I). Edson, J. Lockhart, W. T. T. Jones, 
John Pitcher, R. Daniel, Charles I. Battell, George S. Green.' 1 In 
an interview had with Judge Pitcher, the only one of the nine living, 
that gentleman, who was an eye-witness of the attack, said: "In 
those primitive times this Judicial District was quite sparsely settled, 
and which, in 1830, embraced the counties of Crawford, Perry, Spen- 
cer, Dubois, Warrick, Pike, Gibson, Vanderburgh and Posey. The 
lawyers traveled from court to court on horseback with a change of 
linen in their saddle bags, and we had, all things considered, a much 
gayer time than the lawyers of the present generation, who travel by 
railroad. The prominent members of the bar at that time, on this 
Circuit, were: George S. Green, (a member of the Legislature and 
afterward a Judge) Chas. I. Battell, (subsequently a Judge,) Richard 
Daniel, (subsequently a member of the Legislature,) W. T. T. Jones, 
(a very promising lawyer, who died young,) James Lockhart, (after- 
ward a Judge and Congressman) Eben D. Edson, father of Judge Wm. 
P. Edson, (afterward a member of the Legislature,) Elisha Embree, 
(subsequently a Judge and Congressman,) Amos Clark, (who emigra- 
ted to Texas,) John Law, (afterward a Judge and Congressman,) 
Captain Prince, (a former Judge,) Judge Goodlett, myself, (afterward 
a Judge and member of the Legislature,) and a few others." In reply 
to an interrogatory relating to the episode referred to in the resolution 
above, the old gentleman said: "Judge Goodlett was considered by 
the bar very inefficient, his rulings very often being untenable, but he 
was something of a politician and through that fact he secured the 
appointment to the Circuit Judgeship in 1820, which office he held until 
1830. He was also a man of violent temper, unsatisfactory to the bar, 
and the lawyers, irrespective of politics, worked with a will to defeat 
him. In consequence of this well organized and determined opposition, 
Samuel Hall, his opponent, was appointed by the Governor and took 
the bench vacated by Judge Goodlett, who seemed to become possess- 
ed of a very bitter and resentful feeling against his successor. When 
the regular March term of the Circuit Court convened at Mt. Vernon, 
in 1834, Judge Goodlett was employed as an attorney in a case, dur- 
ing the trial of which he disputed, in a very insolent manner, the rul- 
ing of Judge Hall, who thereupon ruled Judge Goodlett to show cause 
why he should not be fined for contempt of court. That was on the 
7th day of March, and on the following morning, Wm. T. T. Jones, 



HISTORICAL SKETCHES. 3 1 

knowing the fiery disposition of Judge Goodlett and anticipating 
trouble, walked up to Judge Hall while he was on the bench and skil- 
fully dropped into his lap a silken handkerchief, which contained in 
its folds a bright and dangerous dagger, such as were worn by some 
persons in those days. Soon after this Judge Hall informed Judge 
Goodlett that it ' would be in order for him to show cause why he 
should not be fined for contempt of court.' ' I will show cause now,' 
exclaimed Judge Goodlett, springing to his feet, and he attacked Judge 
Hall as he sat upon the bench. With the dagger in his hand Judge 
Hall made furious thrusts at Judge Goodlett, who was jerked suddenly 
backward by the Sheriff, Wm. James, and by which, in all probability, 
his life was saved. This scene created considerable excitement, and 
after it had abated a fine of $50 and imprisonment in the county jail 
was assessed. Judge Goodlett stayed in jail very little of the time, 
and in a brief period sued Judge Hall for false imprisonment. The 
case was taken to Vincennes but was withdrawn before it was brought 
to trial, and thus ended the matter." 

A PRIMITIVE BUT MODEL JUSTICE. 

It was also related of a certain justice who resided in Springfield in 
the earliest days of its history that he delivered the charge that follows 
to a jury that had been called to try a case in which one man had 
accused another of having swindled him at a game of cards. In those 
days anyone who was not familiar with the rules of card playing was 
regarded as a "tenderfoot," and he was looked upon with eyes which 
plainly told that his mental capacities were not above suspicion. He 
was in fact, an individual who had a "weak spot up here," which was 
indicated by tapping the forehead with the finger. As was usual in 
those days, the office of the justice was filled to suffocation with a 
curious crowd of spectators, who listened breathlessly to the statements 

of the prosecuting attorney, Wm. P , who said "that on such a 

night, at such a place, in such a county and State, David B did, 

while playing a quiet game of cards known as euchre, feloniously, 
maliciously and with premeditation to rob, steal and swindle, make 
one point more in the game than he was allowed legally, morally and 
consistently by turning a certain card called the bower, which was 
known to be and by divers persons seen on the bottom of the pack of 
cards with which the game was being played, by which he obtained 
certain money of which the u pot" was composed and one half of which 
belonged to the plaintiff." David was also accused of unlawfully 
getting money by "reniggin" during the progress of the game. Evi- 
dence was introduced as to the character of the opposing parties, and 
the attorneys for the defense and prosecution made speeches, in which 



32 HISTORICAL SKETCHES. 

the reputation of David was defamed and earnestly eulogized. When 
the arguments were closed, the justice adjusted his spectacles, turned 
to the jury, and in a solemn tone of voice, said : "Gentlemen of the 
jury, you have heered the ividence of the witnesses, you have listened 
to and no doubt heered the able argiments of the learned counsel, 
and your duty as jurors will soon take upon it the burden of responsi- 
bility. You may have observed that the p'ints in this h'yar case, like 
the fees of a justice when the State cases goes agin him, is tew, very 
few, and far betwixt — -far betwixt, gentlemen. The Court's knowledge 
of euchre, gentlemen of the jury, is very limited, — not great enough, 
at least, to beat Dann L for the drinks at Sam J 's on Satur- 
day nights — but the p'ints about law which the Court knows can be 
bet on every time, gentlemen, and you're just as sure to win as you 

are of bein' converted at Preacher J 's church, gentlemen. This 

Court has went through 'Blackstone on Law' onc't and she is a 
'restling with him purty hard at this time, and she has read 'Hoyle's 
Elementary Principles on old Sledge,' from which, gentlemen, she 
has gathered a few p'ints on poker ; but she ain't worth a smell on 
euchre. No, gentlemen, she couldn't git a pinch if she was playin' 
for a bushel on euchre, but she thinks, if she is blind, that she sees 

the p'ints in this case. David B and Pharly H was playin' 

this game what the law calls euchre and the stakes was ten dollars 
a side^ and, as you have heerd with your own ears, David he won. 
Is it the proper thing, gentlemen, to fine David for winning? Would 
you like to be fined because you won ? The Court, bein' human, 
would like to win herself. The attorney for the plai'ntiff says, with 
his eyes blazin' like rockets and his face as red as Spanish pepper, 
that David swindled. The Court don't remember that this p'int 
was proved, and she thinks she has trailed the ividence purty well. 
No, sir, gentlemen of the jury, there ain't an ioter of ividence to show 
that he proved it. It looks as if the attorney was a liar, gentlemen. 

The Court believes he did lie. David B don't cheat at keards. 

The Court she knows this to be a fact, for ain't she played whisky- 
poker and old sledge with David for more'n two years, and did she 
ever ketch him puttin' up the papers, orturnin' Jacks from the bottom ? 
No, gentlemen, she never did. It is your right, gentlemen, to do 
with David as you see fit, but these are the p'ints in the case, gentle- 
men of the jury: First, if you find that David B won Pharly 

H 's money, the fact is clear that the 'run' of the keards was 

favorable to David ; second, if you discover that Pharly lost his money 
you must conclude that he was in very bad luck. I submit these 
p'ints to you, gentlemen of the jury, feeling that when you retire you 
will not meditate long on the matter, as David has a few ducats in his 
breeches that is burnin' to buy the drinks for the whole crew of us." 



HISTORICAL SKETCHES. 



33 



When the charge was finished the jury of six men, by their fore- 
man, John W , announced the verdict, which was " not guilty." 

Soon afterward they were marching to the tavern of Jacob S , with 

the expressed determination of " takin' suthin' for their stomach's 
sake!" This is not a matter of record, but we give the incident as it 
was substantially related to us by one who claims to have heard it a 
few years after the trial actually took place. 

Warner Clark, appointed to fill the vacancy caused by the death 
of Thomas Moore Parke, Assessor of the County, was paid $44 by 
the Board of Commissioners for assessing all the taxable property of 
the County in the year 18 18, excepting that of Robb Township, 
(which was assessed by Thomas Robb and for which he was paid $3,) 
the towns of Mt. Vernon, Cynthiana and Springfield. Samuel Jones 
and John Burlison, for that year, were paid $1 each for assessing the 
property of Mt. Vernon. Lewis Williams and Wm. Cater were each 
paid $1 for assessing the property of Cynthiana, for that year, and 
Michael Saltzman, for the same year, was paid $1 for assessing the 
property of Springfield. Thus it will be seen riiat the total cost of 
assessment for the County for 1818, amounted to $52. The cost to 
the County for the same work in 1881 was $1,592. 

The following incidents are taken from Baskin, Forster & Co.'s 
Illustrated Historical Atlas of Indiana : 

"A suit was brought on a note before James Winemiller, Justice 
of the Peace, who had settled at 'Diamond Island,' now West Frank- 
lin. The obligation expressed in the note was: *• The payment of a milk 
cow. 1 The note was one year over due, and the judgment of the 
court was : ' The defendant shall pay the plaintiff, at once, one milk 
cow and a 'young calf "', the court alleging that 'had the debt been 
paid at maturity the cow would, doubtless, have had a calf, and its 
payment now will be interest on the note.' " 

"Audubon, the celebrated naturalist, resided for some time at 
Henderson, Kentucky. He made a contract with a man living on 
the Indiana side of the river, near the present Henderson ferry, to 
furnish him one hundred coon skins by a certain date. The man 
failing to fulfill his part of the contract, Audubon sued him before Jack 
Anthony, a Justice, residing near the same ferry. The defendant 
alleged, in his defence, 'that he had proceeded in good faith to carry 
out his part, but, unfortunately, killed his dog in felling a tree. He 
applied to the plaintiff for his dog, which was refused him, and he was 
wholly unable to go on.' The Court directed 'the case continued for 
three months, and the plaintiff to furnish the defendant his coon-dog;' at 
the expiration of the time the contractwas filled. The case was dismissed 
without cost, and Wat Bryant, constable, procuring a quart of whisky 
from a trading boat near by, a drink all round satisfied both parties." 



34 HISTORICAL SKETCHES. 

The Board of County Commissioners, in September, 1857, purchas- 
ed of Asbury Ferguson 120 acres of land, for the use of the paupers 
of the County. It is located near Stewartsville and is very well im- 
proved, though it is claimed that it is not sufficiently productive to 
supply the poor of the County with their vegetables. 

EDUCATIONAL AND RELIGIOUS. 

Changes in the character of the school houses as well as in the 
manner of conducting schools have occurred with the same rapidity as 
in other features of developement. Only a few years ago comparatively 
pupils were taught by itinerant pedagogues a few months in the year, 
and at that time the ' 'professors" were paid by private subscription. 
A little later an act of the Legislature' was passed creating a "Seminary 
fund," which owed its growth principally to fines and forfeitures aris- 
ing from criminal cases before the Courts In later years a tax for 
school purposes was added to the sources of the revenue and a law 
was also enacted creating the office of County Examiner or Superin- 
tendent, before whom it was necessary for all teachers to be examined 
and by whose authority they were permitted to teach. This law is 
now in force. Each applicant for a license is required to pass a satis- 
factory examination, and in the event of his failure to answer all of 
such questions as are submitted to him he is graded according to the 
standard of his "per centage." If he fails to answer a number of 
questions and by this means reduces his "per centage" to a grade 
below that which entitles him to a certificate to teach six months, 
he is compelled to undergo other examinations subsequently before he 
can .obtain a school. Consequently the teachers of the present time 
are qualified to act as preceptors so far as their knowledge of the text 
books is concerned. The Normal school graduate is considered more 
able to perform the duties of the school room to better advantage 
on account of the training in discipline which he receives at that 
institution. There are now in the County eighty-one district school 
houses, besides twelve commodious and comfortable brick buildings in 
the various towns and villages, in all of which the excellent system of 
the graded school is established. At present one hundred and nineteen 
teachers, to whom is annually paid the sum of $32,383 and who hold 
certificates of various grades issued by the County Superintendent, 
Mr. James Kilroy. There is no district in the County in which terms 
shorter than four and one-half months are taught, and none in which 
the terms are longer than eight months. The average number of 
months in which schools are taught in the county is six; and the 
average daily allowance to teachers is, males, $2.37; females, $1.71. 
The buildings now used in the County for educational purposes were 



1480982 

HISTORICAL SKETCHES. 35 

erected at a cost of $133,580. And thus it is in this day of enlightened 
civilization and this day of wonderful progress. Is it to be considered 
strange that our children exhibit more precocity and mature earlier 
than they did when even we were the "rising generation?" In very 
early times such circumstances surrounded the pupil as made it neces- 
sary for him to obtain his knowledge by the greatest efforts. He was 
confronted with obstacles in many forms, and the "pinnacle of fame" 
was seen through mists of forbearance, of severe trial and almost 
supernatural effort. In the primitive days he was compelled to per- 
form the chores of the household, to devote daylight hours out of 
school to the assistance of his parents and to acquire his lessons by the 
flickering, unpleasant light of the "tallow dip" or the blinding glow of 
the "black jack" on the hearth. Nor were the school rooms of that 
period characterized by their comfortable features. The primitive 
"temple of learning" was a small cabin, built of logs, chinked and 
daubed, with puncheon floors. The desks and seats were about as 
rude as imagination can picture. The chimneys were built of small 
logs, while apertures in the sides of the houses admitted the light. In 
the winter seasons these openings were covered with rawhide. 

In 1803 the American spelling book was copyrighted. It was bound 
in wooden covers and was the chief text-book, though the advanced 
pupils who could afford them used the English reader and studied 
Pikes arithmetic. It is said that the old spelling book was a "valuable 
piece of property," and it was the only text-book to most pupils in 
spelling, reading, geography, grammar and moral philosophy. What 
a contrast ! To-day the pupil sits at his elegant desk in a pleasant room, 
has an unlimited number of books, has the advantage of the improve- 
ment suggested by years of experience in imparting knowledge and 
reads from the newspapers such things as relate to science, politics, 
literature, religion and all other subjects which tend to elevate and 
enlighten. In one day now the pupil through the glorious achieve- 
ments in the electrical and mechanical sciences learns more than was 
imparted to the pioneer children in a whole year. 

The enumeration of school children, ranging from six to twenty- 
one years of age, for the year 1881, was as follows: For Black Town- 
ship, 1,703 ; for Lynn, 558; for Point, 336 ; for Harmony, 453; for 
Robb, 592; for Marrs, 1,104; f° r Robinson, 716; for Smith, 376; for 
Bethel, 229; for Center, 401; town of New Harmony, 399, and the 
city of Mt. Vernon, 1,339; total, 8.202. 

We take the following from the sketch of Genl. Hovey, to which 
we have referred elsewhere : 

' 'There are about 40 churches in the County, belonging to Methodists, 
Baptists, Catholics, Christians, Presbyterians, and Episcopalians, while 
there are some 10 churches belonging to the German Lutheran and 



36 HISTORICAL SKETCHES. 

Methodist denominations, and about 30 preachers who officiate regularly. 
The first Methodist Church in this part of Indiana, was established in 
1814, at the house of John Griffin, in Gibson County, Rev. John 
Scripps, minister. In 1815, shortly afterward, Rev. Thomas King and 
Rev. Thomas Davis, were sent to this County on the Circuit. In the 
same year came the Rev. John Schrader,* the oldest minister 
now living in the County and famous for many years as a 
great revivalist. The Rev. Samuel Jones, a Baptist, was probably 
the first Christian minister within the limits of Posey County. He 
established churches in various portions of the County. The Cumber- 
land Presbyterian Church was established in this part of the State as 
early as 1816, and ihad as their pastors Revs. Hiram [Hunter, David 
Lowry and two brothers by the name of Barnett. The Christian Body 
or New Lights, organized their first Society in 181 5 or 181 6. at Moultry's 
meeting house. Their Ministers were Revs. James Moultry and Joseph 
Wasson, who came to this country at an early day." 

POSEY'S WAR RECORD. 



CONTAINING A LIST OF COMPANIES AND THEIR OFFICERS, THE REGIMENTS 

TO WHICH THEY BELONGED AND THE ENGAGEMENTS OF THE 

SERVICE DURING THE REBELLION. 

No County in the State, at the commencement of the Rebellion in 
1 86 1, showed a greater loyalty and a more creditable patriotism than 
Posey. When the meagre and indefinite news of Fort Sumpter's fall 
had spread throughout the land it created intense excitement, ard when 
the deplorable intelligence was confirmed by the dispatches of the 
authorities at Washington, a deep anxiety as to the safety of the country 
and a burning desire to avenge the atrocious and traitorous act was 
felt by the people at the North who had the welfare of the Nation at 
heart. The news confirming the unloyal and treasonable course of the 
people of South Carolina was received on the 14th of April, 1861, and 
on the morning of the 15th Governor Morton telegraphed the follow- 
ing message to President Lincoln : " On behalf of the State of Indiana, J 
tender yon, for the defense of the Nation, and to uphold the authority of the 
Government, ten thousand men." On the same day the proclamation 
of the President, calling upon the States of the Union for 75,000 men, 
was issued. The "appeal to all loyal citizens to favor, facilitate, and 
aid this effort to maintain the honor, the integrity, and the existence of 
our National Union, and the perpetuity of popular government, and to 
redress wrongs already long endured," had the desired effect. The 

*Mr. Shrader died in 1880 at the advanced age of 90 years, mourned by all who knew him. 



HISTORICAL SKETCHES. 37 

belief that the Government was in imminent danger made the necessity 
of active and decisive measures more apparent, and to the end that the 
institutions so dear to the true American should be preserved and per- 
petuated volunteers to the number reaching far above the quota of the old 
Hoosier State soon poured into "Camp Morton", at Indianapolis, eager 
for the fray which seemed inevitable and which proved so disastrous. 
In this movement Posey County was one of the foremost. In the war 
for the suppression of the Rebellion the County was represented in the 
Thirteenth, Fourteenth, Fifteenth, Twenty-fourth. Twenty-fifth, Sixtieth, 
Sixty-fifth, Eightieth, Ninety-first, One hundred and Twentieth and the 
One hundred and Thirty-sixth Regiments of infantry, and in the First 
and Tenth Regiments of cavalry, the approximated number of men 
furnished by the County for the regular service being 1,700. In ad- 
dition to these there was a regiment of State militia, or "home guards", 
as they were commonly denominated, composed of ten companies, 
which was partially organized by Col. A. P. Hovey, in the summer of 
1861. It is said of Col. Hovey that he showed the "utmost zeal, energy 
and tact" and that his "command was making rapid progress toward? 
military efficiency, when, about three months from the date of his ap- 
pointment", he was highly complimented by Governor Morton in 
tendering him the position of Colonel of the Twenty-fourth Indiana 
Volunteers, which he accepted. This regiment, under the command 
of Col. Hovey, distinguished itself by gallantry in a number of hard- 
fought battles, especially at Champion Hill, where the enemy was 
charged and defeated most handsomely. The Colonel was promoted 
on the 28th of April, 1862, to the position of Brigadier General. Col. 
Enoch R. James succeeded Col. Hovey as commander of the " home 
guards" — First Regiment, Indiana Legion — and the work of organizing 
and drilling was continued by him "a little more than a year", when 
he resigned and was succeeded by Col. John A. Mann. Incursions 
by the guerillas were threatened frequently during the incumbency of 
Col. James, at which the citizens of Mt. Vernon were greatly alarmed, 
but apprehension was allayed to a considerable degree when the Legion 
rallied for their defense. This military organization was paid a very 
high compliment by a writer of considerable note when he said: "It 
is proper to state that the Legion was the portal through which thou- 
sands of the best of our soldiers entered the army. The martial 
enthusiasm which it awakened and nurtured, could not be satisfied 
with home service, however important that duty might be regarded, 
and the Legion soon became to be reviewed as the nursery from which 
the old regiments and batteries of volunteers were to be recruited and 
new ones organized. 

The Legion, in the Winter and Spring of 1863, were often called 
upon " to do guard duty along the river for a distance of thirty miles." 



38 HISTORICAL SKETCHES. 

"Late at night, on the 9th of July, 1863/' says Terrell, " Colonel 
Mann received orders from Governor Morton to hold his command 
in readiness for immediate service in preventing rebel reinforcements, 
the raid of John Morgan being then in progress through another sec- 
tion of the State. Messengers were dispatched to rally the compa- 
nies, and although many of them resided at a distance, some of them 
as far as fourteen miles from headquarters, such promptness was dis- 
played that every company, and nearly every man belonging to the 
regiment, had reported at Mt. Vernon before noon of the 10th. At 9 
p. m. seven companies of infantry embarked on board transports 
and proceeded up the river, while the cavalry marched in the same 
direction. Arriving at Evansville, the regiment went into camp with 
other troops rendezvoused at that point. Rumors of a threatened guer- 
illa raid, as a counter-movement to help Morgan into Posey County, 
induced Col. Mann to return to Mt. Vernon the next day with the 
cavalry. The infantry remained at Evansville several days, when it 
being evident that they could not be used against Morgan, they were 
ordered to report to Col. Mann, at Mt. Vernon, by whom they were 
dismissed to their homes. 

"During the remained of 1863 unusual quiet reigned along the 
border, and this command was not called upon for further service. 
The year 1864 was characterized by frequent alarms, and the services 
of the First Regiment were varied and arduous. Forrest's raid 
through Western Kentucky, and his attack on Paducah, in March of 
that year, created an apprehension that he intended moving North- 
ward, striking the Ohio at Uniontown or Henderson, and thence raid- 
ing the border towns of Indiana. The battalion was again called out, 
and performed guard duty for several days, or until the rebels were 
reported as moving rapidly to the Southward. 

" A few weeks later, formidable bands of guerillas appeared along 
the Kentucky shore, and, with, more than their usual boldness, at- 
tempted to steal a number of horses from citizens of Mt. Vernon and 
vicinity, but succeeded in securing only a single horse. The Legion 
was called to arms and a permanent guard established along the en- 
tire border of the County." 

In July, 1864, it was learned, through the cooperation of Union 
citizens in that State, that the rebel Colonels, Johnson and Seipert, and 
Majors Chenoweth and Taylor were in Henderson and Union 
Counties, Ky. , with a force of men variously estimated at from seven 
hundred to twelve hundred. A raid on Newburgh, Indiana, before 
his appearance in this section had given Colonel Johnson a reputation 
as a bold and cruel man. It was not to be wondered at, therefore, 
that his presence occasioned no little alarm, and rigid measures were 
adopted at once by Col. Mann to repel any invasion that might be 



HISTORICAL SKETCHES. 39 

attempted. It was soon concluded to form an expedition into the 
district infested with the rebels, which was acted upon on August 17th, 
"three days after the inception of the movement," when "750 men, 
infantry and cavalry, were in rendezvous at Mt. Vernon, awaiting 
marching orders." This force "consisted of the Forty-sixth Regiment 
Indiana Volunteers, Col. Bringhurst, commanding, 200 men; the non- 
veterans of the Thirty-second Regiment Indiana Infantry Folunteers, 
Col. Erdelmeyer, commanding, 200 men; parts of several companies 
of infantry and three companies of cavalry of the Legion, from 
Vanderburgh, Warrick and Posey Counties — about 350 men. Five 
pieces of artillery, belonging to the Legion, were added, and as there 
were no horses for the guns, it became necessary to press them, which 
was done by Genl. Hovey, in Posey, and Genl. Hughes, in Vander- 
burgh, to the infinite disgust of owners of fine Stock." The expedition 
into Kentucky by these troops was attended with no serious results, 
and after a few days the men returned to their homes. They captured 
five or six prisoners, among whom was a Captain Bates, in 
whose pockets and baggage sufficient proof was found to confirm the 
belief that an incursion into Posey County was intended and would 
have been consummated had not their plans been thwarted. "There 
can be no doubt that the efficiency and constant vigilance 
of the officers and men of the First Regiment prevented frequent 
guerilla incursons, and even more formidable invasions, by 
which incalculable loss and damage would have been inflicted upon 
the inhabitants." Besides the Indiana regiments which have been 
mentioned as having in their ranks soldiers from Posey County, many 
from this County belonged to regiments and companies organized 
outside and in other parts of the State. These we are unable to give, 
but have compiled and condensed an accurate report of the organiza- 
tion of the companies recruited in the County, which are as follows: 

COMPANY "A," TENTH CAVALRY (ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTY-FIFTH) 
REGIMENT. 

Captain. Sylvanus Milner ; First Lieutenant, Thomas Caborn ; 
Second Lieutenant, Wm. F. Dixon. Sergeants — Samuel F. Row (1st); 
John W. Row (2d.); Richard Barter (3d); Hynes M. Terry (4th); 
Lewis Ridell (5th). Corporals— Wm. H. Duly (1st); Urbin S. Marrs 
(2d); Urbin Ruminer (3d); Marcus P. Rogers (4th), and Oceola Mur- 
phy (5th). This company was recruited during the Fall and Winter of 
1863, and went into camp at Evansville, soon afterward joining the 
regiment at Columbus and going thence to Pulaski, Tenn., where, on 
September 28th, they fought a battle with Forrest. They also fought 
battles at Washville, Little Harpeth, Reynold's Hill, and Sugar 



'40 HISTORICAL SKETCHES. 

Creek, while in that locality, in which the loss of the regiment was 
127 men and officers. The regiment was mustered out of service at 
Vicksburgh, Miss., August 31, 1865, and returned to Indianapolis, 
September 5th, with twenty-eight officers and 519 men. The company 
was originally composed of 121 men, only thirty-six of whom lived to 
return, and all of whom nearly were residents of Posey County. 

COMPANY "K", TENTH CAVALRY, ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTY-FIFTH, 
REGIMENT. 

Captain, Dewitt C. James; Alexander G. Twigg, First Lieutenant. 
This company was almost wholly made up of Posey County resi- 
dents, most of whom, however, were not mustered into service until 
March, 1864. 

COMPANY "A", TWENTY-FIFTH REGIMENT INDIANA VOLUNTEERS. 

Captain, George W. Saltzman; First Lieutenant, Enoch J. Ran- 
dolph; Second Lieutenant, Absalom Boren.j Sergeants — James P. 
Bennett (1st); Gilbert M.Taylor (2d); Wm. Taylor (3d); Wheeler 
Dexter (4th), and John L. Ragland (5th). Corporals — Wm. Ashworth 
(Vst); Wm. J. Blackburn (2d); Felix G. Edmonds (3d); Charles 
Champagne (4th); James McCauley (5th); David R. Vint (6th); 
Wm. Todd (7th), and Shubel York (8th. This company was a full 
one, and was wholly composed of citizens of the County. 

COMPANY "F", TWENTY-FIFTH REGIMENT, INDIANA VOLUNTEERS. 

Captain, Victor C. Larkin; First Lieutenant, Robert G. Shannon; 
Second Lieutenant, Miles V. Wilsey, who resigned and was succeeded 
by Rufus F. Larkin, who was originally First Sergeant; Jos. Thornton, 
•Second Sergeant; John H. Oaks, Third Sergeant; Bertrand V. Prich- 
ard, Fourth and Nathaniel Henderson, Fifth Sergeants. Corporals — 
Isaac N. Allyn (1st); Wm. N. Connor (2d); C. W. Browning (3d); 
Burrows Miller (4th); Stafford Carr (5th); Peter Kivett (6th); Robert 
Jones (7th), and Ben. F. Aldridge (8th). 

The Twenty-fifth was organized at Evansville, July 17th, and was 
mustered into service for three years August 19, 1861, at the same 
place. The regiment was engaged in eighteen battles and skirmishes, 
m, which eighteen were killed, two hundred and fifty-five were 
Wounded, four missing and seventeen were captured. It marched on 
foot 3,200 miles, traveled by rail 1,350 miles and on transports 2,430 
miles. When it was first organized it mustered 1,046 men, 686 re- 
cruits having been subsequently added. Three hundred and ninety- 



HISTORICAL SKETCHES. 4 1 

one died of disease or wounds, 695 were discharged on account of 
wounds and disability, while thirty-seven were transferred to batteries 
and other regiments, and 133 deserted. Thus it will be seen that the 
Twenty-fifth was in considerable active service, and, be it said to their 
credit, they acted gallantly in all engagements. 

COMPANY "A", SIXTY-FIFTH INDIANA VOLUNTEERS. 

Captain, Walter G. Hodge ; First Lieutenant, Moses Ashworth ; 
Second Lieutenant, Barney York; Sergeants — John Duckworth (1st); 
Win. Wimpelberg (2d) — promoted Adjutant before expiration of ser- 
vice; Wm. P. Finch (3d) ; Harrison C. Stout (4th) ; Warren T. Jack- 
son (5th). Corporals— John W. Perkins (1st); Andrew J. Aldridge 
(2d); Joshua Wallace ($d) ; John Nicols (4th,) ; Hickerson Mockbee 
(5thj; James T. Black (6th); Seymour S. French (7th), and Wm. 
P. Aldridge (8th). This company was composed of 113 men, all of 
whom, with few exceptions, were residents of the County. It was muster- 
ed into service at Evansvilleon theiSth of August, 1862. The regiment 
went to Kentucky immediately, and on the 27th of the same month 
attacked a rebel regiment under the command of the noted Adam 
Johnson, taking possession of the town of Madison. The regiment 
was afterward removed to and distributed through the Counties West 
of the Nashville Railroad, where it remained until August 18th, 1863, 
when they all reported at Glasgow. During this period the regiment 
fought the battles of Zollicoffer, Blountsville, Rheatown, Walker's 
Ford, Tenn, Bean Station. Powder Springs Gap, Skagg's Mills and 
Dandridge. The regiment, on April 24th, 1864, was dismounted and 
assigned to the Second Brigade, Third Division, Twenty-third Army 
Corps, and joined Sherman's army April 30th, when that Army began 
moving on its Atlanta Campaign. The regiment was in the battle of 
Resacca, May 14th, and participated in all the engagements of the 
Campaign until the capture of Atlanta. It was in the pursuit of Hood's 
army and engaged conspicuously in the battle of Nashville. It also 
engaged in the attack on Fort Anderson, N. C, February, 18th, 1865. 
A skirmish at Town Creek, February 20th, ended its engagements, 
and on the 2 2d of June, at Greensboro, it was mustered out of ser- 
vice. The loss of the regiment during its service was, killed, 26; 
wounded, 86, and captured, 61 ; total, 173. 

COMPANY " B", SIXTIETH INDIANA VOLUNTEERS. 

Captain, Wolfgang Hyne ; First Lieutenant, Alfred D. Owen; 
Second Lieutenant, Wm. Holton. Sergeants — Joseph Noble (1st); 
James Cabell (2d); John H. Workman [3d]; Wm. H. Hollow (4th] 



42 HISTORICAL SKETCHES. 

and John Gale (5th) Corporals — Josiah J. Jones, (1st); Henry 
Schenck (2nd); James W. Gray (3d); Wm. H. Wheeler (4th); Wm. 
Price (5th) ; Joseph Harvey [6th] ; Joseph A. Barrett [7th], and Thomas 
B. Alman [8th]. 

COMPANY "c", SIXTIETH INDIANA VOLUNTEERS. 

Captain, Jessie Nash; First Lieutenant, Richard A. Wilsey; Second 
Lieutenant, John O'Neal. Sergeants — Courtland D. Slow (1st); Alex- 
ander Stallings (2d); Isaac Wilson [3d]; John F. Wade (4th); and John 
F. Campbell (5th.) Corporals — Henry Hitchcock (1st); Henry C. 
Endicott [2d]; Luther Wilson [3d]; Wm. A. Reeves [4th]; John P. 
Cavett [5th]; Isaac Randolph [6th]; John M. Reeves [7th), and 
David Robinson [8th]. 

COMPANY "e", SIXTIETH INDIANA VOLUNTEERS. 

Captain, Henry Fitton; First Lieutenant, Walter E. Thrall; Second 
Lieutenant, Philip L. Cox. Sergeants — Eugene Thrall [1st]; James 
T. Wiggins [2d]; Wm. H. Brooks [3d]; Enoch Greathouse [4th]; and 
Jonathan Jackson [5th]. Corporals — Jesse Harmon [1st] ; Wm. Arnold 
[2d]; Nathaniel Martin [3d]; Francis Cash [4th]; Nimrod Latimore 
[5th] ; Bartley Tisdale [6th]; James B. Hunter [7th]; Francis D. Bolton, 
Quartermaster's Sergeant. 

COMPANY "f", SIXTIETH INDIANA VOLUNTEERS. 

Captain, Joseph B. Cox; First Lieutenant, George W. Merril; 
Second Lieutenant, Horace P. Owen. Sergeants — David Greathouse, 
1st; James M. Miller, 2d; Mason O. Newman, 3d; Cressey K. Cole, 
4th, and George Peva, 5th. Corporals — John M. Gregory, 1st; John 
J. Parks, 2d; George W. Newman, 3d; Peter W. Weldon, 4th; 
Lewis Ragland, 5th; Benjamin F. Greathouse, 6th; Calvin Conner, 
7th, and Thomas Elderfield, 8th. 

"The Sixtieth Regiment was raised under orders authorizing 
Lieut. -Col. Richard Owen, of the Fifteenth regiment, to recruit a 
regiment and rendezvous at Evansville. A partial organization was 
made at that place in November, 1861, and during the progress of 
enlisting, the regiment was ordered to Camp Morton, Indianapolis, on 
the 22d of Febuary, 1862, to guard prisoners, and, while on duty 
there,, the organization was perfected — the last companies being must- 
ered in in the month of March." All the foregoing companies were 
composed of 100 men each, all of whom, with few exceptions, were 
residents of Posey County. The regiment left Indianapolis, June 20, 



HISTORICAL SKETCHES. 43 

1862, and went to Lebanon, Ky., thence to Mumfordsville, where 
seven companies were captured by the advance of Bragg's army, on 
September 14th. The three companies not captured were on duty in 
guarding a railroad bridge over Rolling Fork, near Lebanon Junction. 
The seven companies, after being paroled, went to Indianapolis, where 
they were joined by the other three. The regiment, during its service 
of three years, lost heavily in its numerous engagements, and its record 
shows that its actions were gallant and highly creditable. The last 
battle the Sixtieth engaged in was that at Carrion Crow Bayou, La., 
November 3, 1864. After remaining at Algiers, opposite New Orleans, 
until February 24, 1865, the regiment proceeded to Indianapolis, where 
it was mustered out March 21, 1865 

COMPANY "c", FIRST CAVALRY, TWENTY-EIGHTH REGIMENT, INDIANA 
VOLUNTEERS. 

Captain, John K. Highman ; First Lieutenant, Josiah Forth ; 
Second Lieutenant, Julian D. Owen. Sergeants — Wm. McReynolds, 
1 st ; John S. Wilsey, Q. M's. Surg't; David Wilsey, 2nd; James L. Cary, 
3d; Chas. H. Randolph, 4th, and Richard Flower, 5th. Corporals — 
Wm. D. Garten, 1st; John Cale, 2nd; Robert H. Healy, 3d; Alex- 
ander A. Allison, 4th; Mark McCauley, 5th; James S. Alcorn, 6th; 
Thomas Caborn 7th, and Geo. W. Richards, 8th. 

COMPANY "d", FIRST CAVALRY, TWENTY-EIGHTH REGIMENT, INDIANA 
VOLUNTEERS. 

Captain, Lyman W. Brown ; First Lieutenant, Geo. P. Deweese ; 
Second Lieutenant, James P. Talbott. Sergeants — Geo. W. Brown, 
1st; James L. Williams, 2nd; Henry Mann, 3rd; John D^ Crouch, 4th; 
Geo. P. Hackley, 5th, and James T. Winters. 6th. Corporals — Geo. 
T. Gorden, 1st; Wm. C Page, 2nd; Orison J. Kyler, 3rd; Theodore 
Scheifner, 4th ; James E. Dodd, 5th; Smith Winchell, 6th; Robert 
Carsell, 7th, and Wm W. Little, 8th. 

COMPANY "H", FIRST CAVALRY, TWENY-EIGHTH REGIMENT, INDIANA 
VOLUNTEERS. 

Captain, James M. Barter; First Lieutenant, Ed. S. Hayes; Second 
Lieutenant, John Harding. Sergeants — Oliver C. Terry 1st; George 
Barter 2nd; Francis Greathouse 3rd; Miles Hay den 4th; Thomas 
Chatsman, 5th, and Miles Connor, 6th. Corporals — Geo. W. Barter, 
1st; James M. Werts, 2d; James R. Black, 3d; Hynes M. Terry 



44 HISTORICAL SKETCHES. 

4th; Reuben H. Norman, 5th; Stephen Hill, 6th; Herick Parks, 7th, 
and Frederick Kemper, 8th. 

These Companies went into Camp at Evansville, the rendezvous of 
the regiment, which was organized and mustered into service on the 
20th of August, 1861, and on the following day proceeded to St. Louis. 
Immediately after their arrival there they were sent to Ironton, Mo., 
where, on September 12th, they had the first taste of war, three Com- 
panies of whom, under Major Smith Gavitt, of Evansville, "had a sharp 
skirmish with a party of rebels", in which five of the enemy were 
captured and four killed. 

In the month of October, the regiment was sent to the vicinity of 
Pilot Knob, remaining there through the Fall and Winter. "While 
campaigning in this region," says Terrell, "the First Cavalry participated 
in the battle of Fredericktown, on the 21st of October, and, in a 
charge that decided the fate of the battle, captured a piece of artillery 
and drove the enemy from the field." Capt. Highman, of Posey 
County, was killed in that engagement and was brought home soon 
afterward, where he received an honorable burial at the hands of the 
First Legion. 

The following Spring, the regiment went to Arkansas, where, on 
July 7th, it fought the battle of Round Hill, and soon after this en- 
gagement went to Helena, where it remained more than a year. Com- 
pany *'C" was detached shortly after the arrival of the regiment at 
Helena as an escort to Gen. Hovey. "This company marched with 
Grant's army to the rear of Vicksburgh, and participated in that cam- 
paign ; afterwards it joined Gen. Franklin's command in Western 
Louisiana, and returned to New Orleans in December, 1863, where it 
remained until July 7, and then proceeded to Arkansas." The regi- 
ment, excepting Company " C," remained in Arkansas until the close 
of its service, where it engaged in several expeditions, butmeeting with 
no serious losses. It was stationed at Pine Bluff during the last year 
of service. In August, 1864, the regiment was ordered to Indianapo- 
lis, where they were discharged September 6th. 

COMPANY "A," NINETY-FIRST INDIANA VOLUNTEERS. 

Captain, James M. Carson; First Lieutenant, Wise D. Kenneth; 
Second Lieutenant, John Corbin. Sergeants — Enoch Snelling. 1st; 
Thomas J. Robertson, 2d; Bedford L. Farris, 3d; Jacob Boucher, 
4th; Joseph A. Leonard, 5th. Corporals — Wm. L. Anderson, 1st; 
John H. Wagner, 2d; Benjamin M. Bailey, 3d; Kit C. Carson, 4th; 
Horace Jones, 5th; James S. Keelin, 6th; Thomas W. Brooks, 7th, 
and Charles Chadwick, 8th. 



HISTORICAL SKETCHES. 45 

COMPANY "d", NINETY-FIRST INDIANA VOLUNTEERS. ' 

; ROD 

Captain, Luke A. Burke; First Lieutenant, Benjamin A. Williams; 
Second Lieutenant, Richard Harris. Sergeants — Josiah VV. Barrett, 
i st; James Lockhart, 2d; Geo. F.jEndicott, 3d, and.Wm. Anglestein, 
4th. Corporals — Wm. P. Jaquess, 1st; Wm. S.' Davis, 2d; Geo. W. 
Johnson, 3d; Thos. Jordan, 4th; Joel F. Endicott, 5th; Francis Smith, 
6th; Wm. Ordell, 7th, and Frank Elliott, 8th. 

COMPANY "G", NINETY-FIRST INDIANA VOLUNTEERS. 

First Lieutenant, Thomas Stevens; Sergeants— Richard Siemens 
and Barnett Phillips ; Corporals — Levitus B. Jones, James B; Keelrh 
and John H. Powell. : . - ; ' :, 

Companies "A" and "D" were wholly composed of residents- di" 
Posey County, while "G" was only partially made tip of citizens of 
the County. As the latter Company was. composed of men from 
several Counties, which were represented in the list of officers as well 
as the list of privates, we do not claim the whole of the Company for 
Posey, and for that reason we give none but the names of the officers 
who were residents of the County. Including the officers, there were 
41 from Posey County in Company "G" of the Ninety-first regiment. 
The regiment was composed of seven companies and was mustered 
into service at Evansville in August, 1862. It went to Henderson, 
Ky., October 10th, whence detachments were sent to. Madisonville 
and Smithland, "where they remained, performing guard duty, and 
protecting that section of Kentucky from guerilla raids, until the 15th 
of June, 1863, when they marched to Russelville, and from thence to 
Bowling Green and Burksville, in pursuit of the rebel chieftain John 
H. Morgan, then making a raid through Kentucky," but. whom they 
could not capture, although strenuous efforts were made to do so. 
The regiment took an active part in the desperate battle which occurred 
at New Hope Church, June 22, 1864, and was also at thebattle, on 
the 15th of that month, at Pine Mountain. , It was engaged in several 
skirmishes previous and subsequent to that time -and ,inthe battlesuof 
Peach Tree Creek, July 20th, and Utoy Creek,, August 6th, ,186^. 
"On the 27th the regiment marched with the army in executing the 
grand movement by the right, which caused the evacuation^of Atlanta." 
After the fall of that place the regiment with- its corps went in. pursuit 
of Hood's army, but was detached from Sherman's army and ordered 
to report to Genl. Thomas before the object was accomplished. Howv 
ever, "it moved North to Chatanooga on November. 5th,. and moved 
from thence to Nashville, Columbia and Centerville and then back to 
Nashville. It took part in the battle of Franklin on 1 the 30th Of 



46 HISTORICAL SKETCHES. 

November, and in the battle in front of Nashville on the 15th and 16th 
of December." Soon after this the regiment went to Washington, 
D. C, thence to other points South, finally reaching Saulsbury, N. C, 
May 8, 1865. It remained here until June 26, when it was mustered 
out of service and immediately left for Indianapolis, whence all that 
were left, excepting the recruits, went to their homes. 

COMPANY l 'H," ONE HUNDRED AND THIRTY SIXTH REGIMENT, INDIANA 
VOLUNTEERS IOO DAYS. 

Captain, Joseph Moore ; First Eieutenant, Ebe W. Murray ; Sec- 
ond Lieutenant, James J. Barrett. Sergeants — Milton Peaise, Order- 
ly; Smith Bloomer, 1st; Charles H. Leonard, 2d; Wm. E. Stiehl, 
3d; Ben. F. Wilson, 4th. Corporals — James W. Davis, 1st; Ed. L. 
Dougherty, 2d; Augustus Gordon, 3d: Virgil Bozeman, 4th; Frank 
Elliott, 5th ; Gilbert Magill, 8th. 

This company, composed entirely of Posey County men, went into 
camp at Indianapolis, and was mustered into service in May, 1864. 
After remaining at the rendezvous of the regiment one week, they 
went, with the regiment, to Ft. Sands, on the L. & N. Railway, fifteen 
miles from Louisville, where they remained for a fortnight, doing guard 
duty, thence to Nashville, thence to Murfreesboro, thence afoot to 
McMinville, forty miles distant, where they relieved veteran soldiers 
on guard duty; thence they went to Murfreesboro afoot, where they 
remained until they returned to Indianapolis, about the 15th of August, 
when they were mustered out, having been in service 102 days. The 
regiment was never in any engagements, though they were inconstant 
readiness. 

COMPANY "F," EIGHTIETH REGIMENT, INDIANA VOLUNTEERS. 

Captain, Russell J. Showers; First Lieutenant, James S. Epperson, 
Second Lieutenant, James H. C. Lowe. Sergeants — Thomas H. En- 
dicott, 1st; Adam Snyder, 2d; John B. Smith, 3d; Alexander D. 
Smith, 4th; Erwin Rogers, 5th. Corporals — Thomas C. Craig, 1st; 
John M. Wolf, 2d; John Brumfield, 3d; Jesse T. M. Whiting, 4th; 
William T. Whiting, 5th : William K. Boren, 6th ; Samuel N. Mont- 
gomery, 7th, and James N. Tyner, 8th. This company was 
principally recruited in Posey County, the number from the County 
being sixty-nine. The regiment was recruited under the call of July, 
1862. It was rendezvoused at Princeton, in August and September, 
and was organized at that time. One of the most disastrous battles 
that the Eightieth was engaged in was that which was fought at 
Champion Hill, or Perry ville, in which it lost 150 men and officers. 



HISTORICAL SKETCHES. 47 

The regiment participated in several active campaigns, and fought the 
battles of Kingston and Mossy Creek, Tenn. It was also at the bat- 
tles of the Atlanta campaign, including those of Resacca, Kenesaw, 
Peach Tree Creek, and those before Atlanta. When Atlanta fell, the 
Eightieth went in pursuit of Hood's army, the pursuit being abandoned 
at Gaylesville, Ala., when the regiment was transferred from Sherman's 
army to the command of Gen. Thomas, with whom, from November 
25th to December 30th, 1864, it was " constantly kept on active duty." 
It took part in the desperate battle of Franklin, and also at Nashville, 
" that proved so victorious to the Union army, under Gen. Thomas." 
It participated in the attack upon Ft. Anderson, near Wilmington, N. 
C, February 19, 1865. It was mustered out of service at Saulsbury, 
N. C, June 22, 1865. The regiment lost, during its term of service, 
325 men and officers, 173 of whom were lost at Resacca, and traveled 
7,245 miles — 1,050 by water, 2,445 by railroad and 3,750 miles on 
foot. 

FIELD OFFICERS OF POSEY COUNTY. 

The following is a list of the soldiers of Posey County who received 
promotion as field officers above the position of Captain for gallantry 
and meritorious services : Genl. Alvin P. Hovey, Col. of the Twenty- 
fourth Regiment, Indiana Volunteers, until the battle of Shiloh, was 
promoted, April 28th, 1862, a Brigadier General. On July 4th, 1864, 
he was commissioned a Major General by President Lincoln. 

Col. Richard F. Barter was an Adjutant of the Twenty-fourth In- 
diana Volunteers at its organization, and on April 26th, 1862, was 
promoted Major ; was promoted again to the position of Lieutenant- 
Colonel for gallantry at Shiloh, which he resigned November 27th, 
1863, to re-enter service as Colonel of the hundred and twentieth In- 
diana Volunteers, remaining in that position until August 8th, 1864, 
when he resigned. He received a very serious wound in the hand at 
the battle of Champion Hill while bearing the colors which had fallen 
from the hands of the standard-bearer, who had received dangerous 
wounds during the fight. 

Richard Owen, who entered the service as Lieutenant Colonel of 
the Fifteenth Indiana Volunteers, was promoted Colonel of the Six- 
tieth, October 21, 1862, which he resigned July 11, 1863. 

Alfred D. Owen, Adjutant of the Eightieth Indiana Volunteers, 
was first promoted Lieutenant-Colonel and then, on January 27, 1864, 
elevated to the position of Colonel of the same regiment. He was 
only twenty one years of age when he received the promotion. 

Julian D. Owen, mustered into service as Second Lieutenant of 
Company "C," First Cavalry, Indiana Volunteers, was promoted Lieu- 
tenant-Colonel of the same regiment March 2, 1864. 



4?>'i HISTORICAL SKETCHES. 

Mark McCauley entered the First Cavalry as a private in August, 
i86t, and was promoted to the position of Major of the regiment in 
July, 1863. 

'Walter G. Hodge entered the army as Captain of Company -, 'A," 
Sixty-fifth Indiana Volunteers, August n, 1862, and was promoted 
Lieutenant-Colonel of the same regiment May 24, 1864, but died of 
typhoid fever at Marietta, Ga., before he was mustered. 

Josiah Forth, who entered the service as First Lieutenant of Com- 
pany "C," First Cavalry Indiana Volunteers, in July, 1861, was pro- 
moted Major of the same regiment November 7, 1861. 

-Jesse Nash, who entered Company "C," Sixtieth Indiana Volun- 
teers, as Captain, was promoted Major of the same regiment February 
8, 1863; resigned August 2, 1863. 

D Sylvanus Milner, who entered the service as Captain of Company 
"K", Tenth Cavalry, November 20, 1863, was promoted Major of the 
same regiment, May 1, 1865. 

Dewitt C. James entered the Tenth Cavalry as Captain of Company 
"K", January 11, 1864, and was promoted Major of the same regi- 
ment June 1, 1865. 

James M. Carson entered the service as Captain of Company "A", 
Ninety-first .Indiana Volunteers, September 22, 1862, and was promo- 
ted Major of that regiment November 1, 1863. 

Posey County expended during the war, for local bounties, $203,- 
202.60; for the relief of soldiers' families, $34,384.84, and lor mis- 
cellaneous military pursoses, $5,178.70, making a total of $242,766. 14. 

Besides her liberality in pecuniary donations, it will be seen that 
she was generous to a very loyal degree in her responses to calls for 
more recruits. The population of the county, at the beginning of the 
war, in round numbers, was 16,000. The number of men furnished 
by her, as stated elsewhere, was 'approximated^ 1,700. Estimating 
one vote to five inhabitants, the county contained 3,200 voters, 15 per 
cent, of whom were, it is reasonable to suppose, unfit for service be- 
cause of old age and infirmities. Deducting this proportion from the 
total number and the number left is 2,720 men. Therefore, the coun- 
ty furnished 62^ per cent, of all her able-bodied men for the sup- 
pression of the rebellion, in active service, while at least 1,000 of 
those remaining were on duty as "jhome guards" almost constantly. 
No county in the State can show a better war record than Posey, 
a record that can always be referred to with pride. Many of her 
brave "soldier boys" sacrificed their lives in defense of their coun- 
try, and they are honored the more because they did so with bravery 
and as an act of duty. We hope, at some future time, to place their 
names upon the pages of a revised work, so that we may pay a tribute 
to their memory which will last through all time. 



HISTORICAL SKETCHES. 49 

TOWNSHIPS OF POSEY AND THEIR ORGANIZATION. 

MARRS TOWNSHIP, 

As it is now bounded, was organized by the Board of County Com- 
missioners, at a meeting of that body, held at Blackford, March 24, 
181 7. It was named after Samuel R. Marrs, one of the first Commis- 
sioners, who came to Posey County from Warrick, of which he was 
the first Sheriff, and who died in 1818. The first election in this 
township was held at the house of Wra. Hutcheson. It is among 
the largest of the ten townships contained in the County, and the 
character of its soil is excellent. With improved facilities for trans- 
portation of its products, it is safe to say that Marrs will take second 
rank to none of her sisters in agricultural wealth. The number of 
acres of land under cultivation in 1880 was 14,245, the yield of wheat 
for that year averaging fifteen, while the yield of corn was thirty-five 
bushels per acre. 

ROBB TOWNSHIP 

Was named after Thomas and William Robb, the first settlers, the 
boundaries of which, March 24, 1817, embraced its present limits, all 
of Bethel and the greater portion of Harmony townships. The first 
election in Robb was held at the house of Langston Drew. This 
township is one of the foremost, and its superior natural advantages 
must and will always keep her at the front. Her soil is rich and her 
people are intelligent and progressive, keenly alive to their immediate 
interests and at the same time show a disposition to encourage the 
welfare of the County in general. The number of acres of land cul- 
tivated in this township, in 1880, was 9,947, the average yield of wheat 
being eighteen and that of corn forty bushels per acre. 

SMITH TOWNSHIP 

Was formed and officially recorded by the Board of County Com- 
missioners, March 24, 181 7, and at that time included its present 
boundaries, with additional territory that has since become a part of 
Warrick and Gibson Counties. It was named after George Smith, one 
of the earliest and most prominent settlers, at whose house the first 
election was held. On August 15, 181 7, "all that part of Smith 
township lying North of the main Big Creek and South of Reeter's 
race" was added to and became a part of Lynn. Smith was the first 
of the townships in the Northern part of the County to secure the 
advantages of railway communication, a subsidy being voted to the 



50 HISTORICAL SKETCHES. 

E. & T. H. R. R. for an extension of its line from Owensville, in 
Gibson County, to Cynthiana, in that township, in 1880. The number 
of acres of land cultivated in Smith in 1880 was 5,897, the production 
of wheat averaging fifteen, while the yield of corn was thirty-five 
bushels per acre for that year. 

LYNN TOWNSHIP 

Was also organized in 181 7, and at that time embraced a part of Harmo- 
ny township, the town of Harmonie (now known as New Harmony) 
being the place where the first election was held. It was named after 
Dann Lynn, the first Representative of the County in the Legislature 
and who was also a member of the Convention which adopted the 
Constitution under which the State was admitted to the Union. In 
1880 the number of acres of land under cultivation in the township 
was 12,119, and the average yield of wheat was fourteen, while that 
of corn was twenty-five bushels per acre. The greater portion of the 
surface is rolling and the character of the soil is splendid. It contains 
a thrifty and prosperous class of farmers, while its schools and churches 
compare very favorably with those of more pretentious townships. 

BLACK TOWNSHIP 

Was named after Hugh. William and Thomas Black, three brothers, 
who were among the very earliest settlers, and who were highly re- 
spected by their acquaintances. On March 24, 1817, when the town- 
ship was organized its territory included what is now known as Point, 
which, from August 14, 182 1, until May 13, 1822, was called Daniel 
township, named in honor of John Daniel, the first permanent settler 
there. The first election held in this township was at the house of 
Thomas Givens, in Mt. Vernon. It is the wealthiest township in the 
County, and, in 1880, had under cultivation 43,007 acres of land, the 
yield of wheat and corn per acre averaging respectively fifteen and 
thirty-five bushels. Its surface is gently undulating, its soil is very 
fertile and its inhabitants, as a class, are frugal, industrious and enter- 
prising. It contained, according to the census report of 1880, 7,000 
inhabitants. Its educational facilities are superior, its standard of 
morality is high and its sanitary condition is excellent. Among the 
earliest settlers of this township were Win. Curtis, father of Thomas, 
Joshua and Wm. B. (who is the father of George W., the incumbent 
of the County Clerk's office), and his cousin, Kel Curtis. They came 
to the County in 181 1. -'Aunt Becky" McFaddin, who died at Mt. 
Vernon, February 3, 1873, in the eighty-seventh year of her age, and 
who was the widow of Andrew McFaddin, was a resident of this 



HISTORICAL SKETCHES. 



township sixty-eight years. "Aunt Becky" was found dead in her 
bed with the Bible in her arms. 



WAGNON TOWNSHIP 

Was organized in March, 1817, and when Vanderburgh was formed, 
January 7, 181 8, it became a part of that county and is now known as 
Perry township. It was named after Wm. Wagnon, a very early settler 
and one of the first panel Of grand jurors that ever sat in Posey County. 

BETHEL TOWNSHIP 

Was formed August 14, 1821, and was named after P. C. Bethel, the 
first white man Who settled within its confines. It is in the extreme 
Northern part of the County, comprises a great deal of superior soil, 
and, in 1880, had under cultivation 4,993 acres of land, which pro- 
duced 53,650 bushels of wheat and 80,011 bushels of corn, averaging 
fifteen of the former and thirty-five bushels per acre of the latter 
cereal. It is abundantly supplied with an excellent growth of timber, 
has good schools and good society. 

HARMONY TOWNSHIP 

Was organized August 14, 182 1, and derives its name from the pecu- 
liar class of people who settled it in 1814 — 15, and who styled them- 
selves the "Harmonie Society," an account of which will be found 
under the sketch of New Harmony. In population and wealth it is 
second only to Black. Its inhabitants are intelligent, industrious and 
public spirited. There were 8,573 acres of land under cultivation in 
the township in 1880, and the yield of wheat and corn for that year 
aggregated 265,402 bushels, the average production being respectively, 
fifteen and thirty-five bushels per acre. 

ROBINSON TOWNSHIP 

Is probably one of the oldest townships in the County, having been 
formed in the first days of the Territory's history, the exact time not 
being known, as there is no record in possession of the County in 
reference to its organization. Enough is known, however, for stating 
that it was named after Jonathan Robinson, a man who was promi- 
nently identified with that section of the County in the "days of long 
ago." The fact that nothing can be found regarding the formation of 
the township tends to confirm the opinion that all documentary evi- 
dence concerning this and the other townships that existed before 



52 HISTORICAL SKETCHES. 

those that are now comprised in the County was destroyed at Vincennes 
in January, 1814, when the office of the Register of the Territorial Land 
Department, with its contents, was burned. The Legislature, by an 
act passed September 7, 1814, appointed Benjamin Parke, John D. 
Hay and Nathaniel Ewing, Commissioners, to receive and record evi- 
dence relating to all papers involving titles to lands that were jeopardized 
by the loss of all instruments of writing consequent upon the destruc- 
tion of the Register's office. The population of this township is largely 
composed of Germans, who have made it one of the most productive 
quarters of the County. No township, taken on the whole, is a source 
of greater pride to the County than this. Its schools are of a superior 
character, its people are thrifty and law abiding and its sanitary con- 
dition is superb. Hon. Wm. Heilman, now a member of Congress 
from the First Congressional District of Indiana, spent the first years 
of his residence in the United States in this township. In 1880 there 
were 9,323 acres of land under cultivation in Robinson, the yield of 
wheat and corn averaging, respectively, fifteen and thirty-five bushels 
per acre. 

CENTER TOWNSHIP 

Was so named because of its central location in the county, and was 
formed from parts of Robinson, Lynn and Harmony, in March, 1859. 
Although it is youngest, it is by no means the least, in point of wealth 
and productiveness. In 1880, there were 7,071 acres of land under cul- 
tivation, the yield of wheat and corn for that year aggregating 153,- 
140 bushels, of which there were 92,445 bushels of corn, which aver- 
aged a yield of 43 bushels per acre. The inhabitants of the township 
are prosperous and thrifty, and show a disposition to improve in every 
particular that is highly commendable. The superior natural advanta- 
ges of the township cannot be ignored, and for that reason we predict for 
it a glorious destiny. 

POINT TOWNSHIP 

Was organized May 13, 1822, and it still retains the boundaries which 
were given it in that year, previous to which time, from August 14, 
1 82 1, it was called Daniel township. Very little of its area, compar- 
tively, has been brought under cultivation, though, in 1880, there 
were 5,155 acres sown to grain, from which 96,305 bushels of corn 
and 17,030 bushels of wheat were harvested. A large proportion of 
its timbered lands, particularly those that lie along the Wabash and 
Ohio rivers, could, and will be, ere long, tilled and made a great source 
of revenue. The first election in the township was held at the house 



HISTORICAL SKETCHES. 53 

of Daniel Owen. The capabilities of Point township, while they are 
not so great as those of her sisters, must be recognized, and when that 
is done, the township will -'bloom and blossom as the rose" and will 
be one of the brightest of the constellations of townships found in 
other quarters of the Union. 

' ' HOOP-POLE " TOWNSHIP. 

As a great many of our readers have frequently heard the word 
"hoop-pole" applied to a township of this county, and as a majority of 
them perhaps do not know how it originated, we give the following 
version, hoping to disabuse the minds of a great many who may 
entertain the idea that such a township had actual existence : About 
fifty years ago, there was a large class of robust, fearless men who fol- 
lowed the river for a livelihood, and who were known as flat-boatmen. 
Generally they were perfect types of physical manhood, men of nerve, 
and by their occupation innured to endurance and hardships. At that 
period the business of transporting goods by means of flat-boats was 
more extensively engaged in than now, and it was not uncommon to see 
a dozen or more of this kind of water craft afloat in mid stream or ly- 
ing at the landing simultaneously. Mt. Vernon was noted abroad as 
a place that claimed, as her residents, a number of hard "cases." 
They were not what is known as desperadoes, but merely men who 
would not scruple at running horse races, playing poker or indulging 
in fisti-cuffs whenever the opportunity was offered. It was some time in 
the year 1834 or '35, when several crews of flat-boatmen were on their 
boats at the landing at Mt. Vernon, and when the idea occurred to 
them that it would be a source of amusement to " turn up the town." 
The first place they stopped was at the saloon kept by John Carson, 
on Water street. Directly opposite this dram shop was a cooper shop, 
owned by John Cooper, in whose employ were several men, who were 
not averse to "sport" and who soon joined the flat-boatmen, with 
whom they tapped glasses and drank frequently. The drinking con- 
tinued until a general fight ensued, in which the coopers were badly 
beaten. The news of this defeat and outrage came to the ears of the 
rough element mentioned, and to avenge the wrong perpetrated upon 
their fellow-citizens, they congregated in numbers at the cooper shop, 
equipped themselves with hoop-poles, and, accompanied by the bruised 
and bleeding coopers, attacked the flat-boatmen. It is said that the 
combat was a long and bloody one, the chances being equally divided 
between the belligerants ; brick-bats whizzed through the air and hoop- 
poles were brandished and fell relentlessly upon the backs of the in- 
vaders like the wrath of the avenging angels. Evidences were final- 
ly shown that the river men were weakening, though this end was slow 



54 HISTORICAL SKETCHES. 

to come about. The citizens were not slow to discover their condi- 
tion, and they charged the enemy furiously, who began a retreat, which 
terminated in a complete rout. The water men beat a hasty retreat, 
pursued by the incensed "land lubbers" to their boats, which they 
quickly unloosed and pushed into the stream. 

The victory was a "glorious one" and the reputation of the village 
for fighting men was grandly sustained. The boatmen, with swollen 
noses and blackened eyes, were carried away on the majestic bosom of 
the Ohio to the sunny clime of the South, where the fragrance of the 
magnolia and orange blossom is perpetual ; where the balmy air is 
healing and where dreams of happiness "dance o'er the mind". They 
passed and were passed in turn by fiat boatmen; their unsightly appear- 
ance elicited inquiry and inquiry produced facts ; facts that confirmed 
the prevalent idea that "they were a bad set at 'Vernon". Whenever 
a man on the rivers, after that event, was seen with a damaged facial 
member, a broken nose or a "mourning" eye, he was accosted with: 
"Been to 'Vernon, "pard? Hoop-pole township, Posey County, is a hard 
un, ain't she?" 

MOUNT VERNON, BLACK TOWNSHIP. 

EMBRYONIC THE FIRST SETTLER AND HIS HOME THE FIRST STORE AND 

TFIE FIRST HOTEL THE TOWN'S INCORPORATION FIRST OFFICERS 

THE FIRST FERRYMAN — THE FIRST AND SUCCEEDING POSTMAS- 
TERS — ADDITIONS AND ENLARGEMENTS THE FIRST AND 

OTHER BANKS THE CITY'S INCORPORATION AND HER 

OFFICERS — THE FIRST DAILY MAIL THE FIRST 

AND OTHER SCHOOLS AND CHURCHES CON- 
FLAGRATIONS — ■ RAILROADS NEWSPA- 
PERS, SOCIETIES, ETC., ETC. 

The town of Mt. Vernon received its name in 1816, when the first 
official plats were recorded by John Wagner, John Givens and Aaron 
Williams, as will be seen under the heading of "additions and enlarge- 
ments," the purchase of the site having been made by those gentlemen 
from Gen. Wm. H. Harrison, as will also be seen under that heading. 
In the year 1795, Andrew McFaddin, ("Tiddle de-dum") a native of 
North Carolina, crossed the Ohio river into Posey County from Ken- 
tucky, at Diamond Island, on a hunting expedition, and it was while he 
was in pursuit of game in the county that he discovered the location of 
the present town of Mt. Vernon. A few years after his return to the 
"dark and bloody ground", or in 1805, he concluded to remove his 
family to Indiana, and he came directly to this place. After he had 
erected his dwelling, ' Slim" Andrew and William McFaddin, two 



HISTORICAL SKETCHES. 55 

cousins, followed him, and they gave the name of McFaddin's Bluff to 
the locality, by which it was known until and some time after the town 
of Mt. Vernon was laid out. 

For a year after their advent into this country they resided on 
the land which is now owned by Frederick Hagerman, and which for- 
merly belonged to Jesse Oatman. Trading boats landed at the rocks 
in front of this farm until about the year i3io, when they began to 
stop at the present wharf, which was constructed by Moses Ross, 
contractor, in 1851, at a cost to the city of $40,000. The McFaddins 
remained at the original landing until the year 1806, when they re- 
moved to the present site of Mt. Vernon, where others soon afterward lo- 
cated and engaged in various pursuits. At the time the McFaddins 
settled here there was a dense growth of heavy timber on the site 
of Mt. Vernon, and as late as 1824 deer were killed at that part of 
the town where Second crosses Main street There were also at that 
time large ponds of water on the block in which Evertson Brothers' 
Mills are situated and on that block now owned by Messrs. Edward 
Evertson, Wm P. Daniel and Noble Craig, and it was to these bodies 
of water that the Nimrods of that day Went in search of wild geese 
and ducks. Many of the old residents of Mt. Vernon on pleasant 
afternoons and evenings, wooed and won their wives in the shade of 
the majestic oaks, stately poplars and graceful maples that covered the 
territory extending from Third street to the banks of the river. Some 
are still living who remember with what joyful expectancy they looked 
forward to that moment when they should take a ramble through the 
forest and listen to the sweet caroling of the feathered songsters and 
enjoy the blissful moments of courtship alone. They will remember, 
too, the wildness of the scene that was presented in a few scattering, 
rudely-constructed log huts in a wilderness of forest, and will recall 
the exciting moments that passed while chasing the beats, wolves and 
other animals that inhabited the locality at that day, when the dusky 
savage, with his rifle and tomahawk, was a familiar sight. The first 
dwelling house built on the territory occupied by Mt. Vernon was 
erected by Andrew McFaddin ("Tiddle-de-dum") at the foot of Store 
street, about the year 1806, where the warehouses of G. W. Thomas 
now stand. It was a primitive structure in every sense. Its floor was 
earthen, while the "bedsteads" were constructed in a manner that did 
not display a great deal of ingenuity on the part of the workman. 
They were made of two horizontal poles fastened at one end to the 
wall and supported by two upright pieces of the same material, while 
the "slats" were round pieces of unhewn timber. The clothing worn 
in those days was made of the skins of wild animals, while mocca- 
sins were the only protection to their feet from the blasts of Winter, a 
majority of the people wearing nothing at other seasons on their pedal 



56 HISTORICAL SKETCHES. 

extremities. Until 1814 marriage licenses were obtained at Vincennes, 
seventy-five miles distant, and, although this fact would at this day, 
no doubt, be considered sufficient excuse for postponing such events 
indefinitely, marriage contracts were consummated very often by the 
pioneers. As a visit to that place could not be made only by horse- 
back along a winding and dangerous trail the devotion of matrimonial 
candidates was highly commendable, an act of faithfulness which, if 
practiced at this day by prospective benedicts, would doubtless in- 
crease a confiding faith in their inamoratas for them. It was a custom 
at that time, and is practiced by some now, for the women to escort 
the bride to bed, while the duty of leading the blushing bridegroom 
to the marital couch devolved upon the male attendants. 

In those days, too, it was not an uncommon occurrence for the 
young people to attend dances barefooted,. and, if the stories of those 
who were "society folks" in that period are to be credited, they en- 
joyed themselves fully as well as they who now "trip the light fantastic 
toe" in the whirling polka or the mazy waltz on waxed floors, to the 
strains of improved instruments and proficient musicians. Then a 
single fiddler furnished the music, and the standard of enjoyment was 
regulated by the amount of energy exhibited by the dancers. They 
danced on puncheon, instead of waxed floors, and the knees of the 
gentlemen were utilized as seats by the ladies. Imagine the embarrass- 
ment of the average swain of to-day in such a position! The ladies in 
those days carried their shoes in their hands to church, where they 
put them on, and where after the services, they took them off again 
The first store in Mt. Vernon was built on the corner of Store and 
Water streets, by Darius North and — Roderick. The building was 
one of very modest proportions and the material used in its construc- 
tion was hewn logs, cut near what is now the corner of Main and 
Second streets. Jesse Y. Welborn erected and kept the first hotel in 
1820, on the corner of Main and Water Streets. He afterwards built 
a hotel on the lot partly occupied by the First National Bank, fronting 
on Main Street. These buildings were also made of logs. The first 
Justice of the Peace was Nathan Ashworth, who was elected in 1816. 
He performed the duties of the office with care and kept an eye on 
the criminal and "civil" complications and "differences" of that time. 

Squire McFaddin was the proprietor of the first ferry boat that ever 
crossed the Ohio river at Mt. Vernon. It was a small vessel, was 
propelled by hand and was built in 1813. 

In 1827 Lionel J. Larkin, John Carson and Mrs. Nancy Nettelton 
kept the only taverns in the town. These places were the rendezvous of 
the village gossipers, tipplers and idlers, where, on Winter evenings, 
they spent the time in tippling and reciting the current rumors and 
incidents. 



HISTORICAL SKETCHES. 57 

Previous to this time, from 1820, Jesse Y. Welborn and Win. 
Crabtree were the proprietors of the hotels of which the embryo village 
boasted, and which were the first places of "public entertainment." 

At that time the principal business portion of the town was built on 
the present wharf, the houses all being frame and having a northern 
exposure. About the year 1845 a ^ re destroyed the greater portion 
of "the row." Among the buildings that escaped destruction was a 
large frame, for several years occupied by Darius North as a general 
store, which is now used as a cabinet shop by Henry Weisinger, and 
which for many years stood where the Masonic Hall now is. 

POSTMASTERS. 

The first Postmaster at Mt. Vernon was Jesse Y. Welborn, whose 
office was in a small building near the Southwest corner of Second and 
Store streets, or in the rear of the residence of G. W. Thomas, Esq. 
He received his appointment during the first year of President Mon- 
roe's administration, sometime in 18 18. Darius North was his suc- 
cessor and "Slim" Jim McFaddin succeeded him. Scarborough Pente- 
cost succeeded him, under the administration of John Q. Adams. Hud- 
son Parke was Mr. Pentecost's successor and was appointed by Martin 
Van Buren. John D. Hinch, the next postmaster, received his ap- 
pointment under the administration of John Tyler. He was succeeded 
by John B. Wilson, he by Harrison O'Bannon, he by John B. Chaffin, 
he by Harrison O'Bannon, he by Wm. M. McArthur, he by Joseph 
Moore, he by Harrison O'Bannon, he by George Kincaid, he by Syl- 
vanus Milner, who received his appointment from U. S. Grant Novem- 
ber 20, 1869, and who in January, 1882, tendered his resignation to 
take effect on March 1, following. Edward Brown was appointed as 
Mr. Milner's successor on January 31, 1882, by President Chester A. 
Arthur and will probably be the postmaster at the time this Work is 
issued. 

'Previous to the appointment of Mr. Welborn, the inhabitants of 
the Southern part of the County got some by the river but the most of 
their mail-matter at New Harmony, which was on the Louisville, Ky., 
and Shawneetown, Ills., route, established in the year 1812. A man 
by the name of John Williams was awarded the contract for carrying 
the first mail, which he did on horseback, the time being limited to 
two weeks in making the round trip. The mail-matter received in 
those days was limited to a few letters, and frequently the postmaster 
carried it in his hat for the convenience of the public. The rates of 
postage were very high, letters of ordinary weight costing from twenty- 
five cents to one dollar. The first daily mail route by stages between 
Mt. Vernon and Evansville was established April 1, 1857. The 



5 8 HISTORICAL SKETCHES. 

"ancient mariner," forced from the track in 187 1 by the railway, was 
frequently the. cause of disappointment by reason of delays, though 
the rattling of its wheels as it was rapidly driven to the post-office, was 
a sound that was listened for by the residents, under ordinary circum- 
stances, with quite a degree of anxiety. In the year 1852 a semi- 
weekly mail route was established between Mt. Vernon and Princeton, 
Wm, T. Hall, contractor. This was continued until 1855, when that 
part of the route between New Harmony and Mt. Vernon was 
abandoned. 

On June 10, 1825, the seat of justice was removed from Springfield 
to Mt. Vernon, where a very ordinary brick building was constructed, 
and which was occupied until 1876, when it was torn down and the 
County officials took possession of the edifice that now adorns the city, 
a description of which will be found under the heading of "Courts of 
the County." The total valuation of real and personal property in Mt. 
Vernon in 1830, as returned by Wm. E. Stewart, County Assessor, 
amounted to $19,637. The expenses of performing the duty of assess- 
ment amounted to $127 20, "which made an average tax," as the 
Assessor stated in his report to the Board of Commssioners, "on each 
$100 of the valuation of sixty-five cents, or very nearly that amount." 



The history of the United States and in the still briefer history of 
Indiana numerous events of importance in banking have occurred. 
Very few systems of banking have been successful, while a majority 
of them have proven disastrous. Although failures of banks cause no 
little astonishment to the people of the country, yet in the days of the 
"wild cat" system it was a matter of great wonder if a. week passed 
without many suspensions. The question of "inflation" and "con- 
traction" have agitated the public mind, while ''paper currency" and 
"specie payment" have been subjects of discussion during the period 
which has intervened since the organization of that branch of business. 
As time advances the advantages of experience may contribute to the 
growth of a perfect system, and when this end is realized a confidence 
productive of happiness will be felt. In the meantime the depositor 
will be uneasy so long as his money and securities are in the hands of 
his banker, and fearful that the truth of the proverb, "Fortune's wings 
are ever ready for flight," will be verified. 

"In the year 1814, the General Assembly of Indiana Territory, 
acting with what seemed to be the will of the people," says Dillon, 
"granted charters to two banking institutions. The Farmers'' and 
Mechanics' Bank of Indiana, at Madison, was incorporated by an act 
approved on the 6th of September. The charter extended, in time, 



HISTORICAL SKETCHES. 59 

to the first of January, 1835 ; and it declared that the property of the 
corporation, including the capital stock, should not exceed the sum of 
$750,000. An act incorporating the Bank of Vincennes was approved 
on the 10th of September. The capital stock of this institution was 
fixed at the sum of $500,000; and the charter vested in the stock- 
holders the privilege of banking, on certain conditions, until October 
ist, 1835." It was in the year 1833 when George S. Green, a brilliant 
lawyer, and who at that time was a member of the Legislature, wrote 
to parties at Mt. Vernon that a State Bank could be established in that 
town if the necessary funds could be secured. With that end in view 
subscription papers were started, but the capitalists of that time would 
n<at, either from fear or parsimony, contribute anything to such a fund, 
and the enterprise failed. The people were without a bank until 1854, 
when George E. Booker and A. S. Curtis founded the first bank, a 
private institution, which, in 1857, was sold to William J. Lowry, 
Richard Barter, Nelson G. Nettelton, John A. Mann and Seth M. 
Leavenworth. The capital of the bank was $14,000. This bank was 
sold, in 1864, to John B. Gardiner, Wra. J. Lowry and N. G. Nettel- 
ton, when it ceased to exist. On the 5th of April, 1864, the First 
National Bank was incorporated, with a cash capital of $50,000, which, 
on September 5, 1865, was increased to $100,000, its present capital. 
The stockholders in the bank at its inception were: John B. Gardiner, 
S. M. Leavenworth, S. S. Dryden, John R. Evertson. James Cawson, 
M. A. Wier, Wm. M. McArthur, John A. Mann, Charles Leunig, 
James F. Welborn, Aaron Lichtenberger, Richard Barter, Milton 
Black, A. G. Crutchfield and John M. Lockwood. The officers of the 
institution, at the date of its organization, were: John B. Gardiner, 
President, and Seth M. Leavenworth, Cashier. The present officers 
are: John M. Lockwood, President; Asa C. Williams, Vice-President; 
John B. Gardiner, Cashier, and E, W. Rosenkrans, Assistant Cashier. 
Enoch R., Dewitt C. and Lawrence James established the Exchange' 
Bank in 1856, which collapsed in 1863. 

In 1867, S. M. Leavenworth, Joseph F. Welborn, Charles A. Parke 
and Edward T. Sullivan organized and composed the Mt. Vernon 
Banking Company, a private enterprise, with a cash capital of $40,000. 
All the original members, excepting Charles A. Parke, have since 
withdrawn, and the company is now composed of Charles A. Parke, 
Eugene F., Horace P., Alfred D. and Wm. H. Owen, capital, 
$40,000. By a destructive fire, October 19, 1880, (which consumed 
all the buildings fronting on the West side of Main street between First 
and Second streets, save a three-story brick on the corner of Second 
and Main streets) this company lost their building, but which, through 
their pluck and energy, was replaced and ready for occupancy by the 
1 2th of February, following. 



60 HISTORICAL SKETCHES. 

The town in 1824 contained one hundred inhabitants and for a 
time made considerable progress, but its incorporation did not occur 
until 1846. A petition, signed by the residents of the place, was pre- 
sented to the Board of County Commissioners, composed of Jesse Nash, 
Peter Smith and Milton Black, at the September term of that Court, 
1846, praying that body, "for the better regulation of the police and 
general improvement" of the place, to order an election of trustees 
and to perform such other acts necessary for the lawful incorporation 
of the town. The election was held on Thursday, October 1, 1846, 
when Thomas F. Prosser, Noble Craig, Fieldon N. Mills, Walter F. 
Larkin, and Thomas Newman were elected. There were seventy-two 
votes polled at this election, and it is probable that the population of 
the town did not much exceed 350 souls, as an estimate of five persons 
to every vote would show. In February, 1851, the population of the 
town was 1300, by which it will be seen the growth of the place was 
quite rapid. The officers of the first town board were, Thomas New- 
man, President; Thomas F. Prosser, Clerk; S. M. Leavenworth, 
Treasurer and Whipple White, Marshal. 

The election to decide the question of incorporating Mt. Vernon as 
a city was held on the 7th of December, 1865, the vote being 219 for 
and 130 against the proposition. The first election of officers occurred 
on December 27, 1865, and the successful candidates were : Wm. 
Nettelton, Mayor; Wm. H. Whitworth, Clerk; Wm. F. Stiehl, As- 
sessor; Edward S. Hayes, Marshal, and Adam Lichtenberger, Trea- 
surer. The first Board of Council was composed of Wm. M. Mc Arthur, 
and Antone Haas, First ward ; Joseo Gregory and John Pfeffer, Second 
ward, and Edward Brown and Henry Groenland, Third ward. First 
ward embraced all that part of the city lying East of Main and South 
of Fourth streets ; Second ward included all that part lying North of 
Fourth street, and Third ward occupied all that area lying West of 
Main and South of Fourth streets. Wm. Harrow, at the first meeting 
of the Council, was appointed City Attorney, but he refused for private 
reasons to serve, and Wm. P. Edson was elected to fill that position. 

MAYORS OF MT. VERNON. 
(The Mayoralty term and the terms of all other officers are two years.) 

Wm. Nettelton, from January, 1866, to May, 1866; Otto Scheffer, 
from May, 1866, to May, 1867 ; Jonathan H. Burlison, from May, 
1867, to May, 1868, (elected to fill vacancy caused by the death of 
Otto Scheffer); Wm. P. Edson, from May, 1868 to October, 1869, 
(resigned); Jonathan Burlison,'^ from October, 1868, to May, 1872; 
U. G. Damron, from May, 1872, to May, 1874; J. H. Burlison, from 



HISTORICAL SKETCHES. 6 1 

May, 1874, to May, 1878; Oliver C. Terry, from May, 1878, to May, 
1880; John B. Gardiner, from May, 1880, to the present time. 

TREASURERS OF MT. VERNON. 

Adam Lichtenberger, from January, 1866, to May, 1866; James 
B. Campbell, from May, 1866, to May, 1868; Oliver C. Terry, 
from May, 1868, to May, 1878; Wm. F. Burtis, from May, 1878, to 
the present time. 

CLERKS OF MT. VERNON. 

Wm. H. Whitworth, from January, 1866 to May, 1868; David 
King, from May, 1868, to May, 1870; Wm. Wimpelberg, from May, 
1870, to May, 1878; Van B. Jolley, from May, 1878, to the present 



MARSHALS OF MT. VERNON. 

Edward S. Hayes, from January, i866 ; to May, 1868; Jacob Pi- 
per, from May, 1868, to May, 1870; Edward S. Hayes, from May, 
1870, to May, 1878; Michael Mussleman, from May, 1878, to May, 
1880, and Edward S. Hayes, from May, 1880 to the present time. 

ASSESSORS OF MT. VERNON. 

Wm. F. Stiehl, from January, 1866, to May, 1866; Wm. H. Strit- 
ter, from May, 1866, to May 1870; James F. Ferguson, from May, 
1870, to May, 1872; Wm. F. Stritter, from May, 1872, to May, 
1876; Elwood Smith, from May, 1876, to May, 1878; Wm. F. Strit- 
ter, from May, 1878, to May, 1880 — since which time the assessment 
of the township assessors is used, thereby rendering the office of no 
further necessity. 

CITY JUDGES. 

Jonathan H. Burlison, from April 17, 1868, to October 1, 1869, 
when the order creating the office was rescinded, and which has never 
been revived, the duties of the office being imposed upon the Mayor. 

The city tax duplicate for 1881, shows the total value of city lots 
to be $281,610; value of improvements on same, $366,090; value of 
lots and improvements, $647,700; value of personal property, $426,- 
230, making a total valuation of the taxables of $1,078,930, on which 
taxes are paid as follows : Total poll tax, $466 ; dog, $128 ; general 



62 HISTORICAL SKETCHES. 

purposes, $9,668 06; railroad sinking fund, $1,075 73 5 interest on 
railroad bonds, $4,296 04; interest on school bonds, $15; total 
amount of taxes, $15,651 91. 

The bonded indebtedness of the city for the same year, according 
to the report of Wm. Burtis, Treasurer, was $52,480, and the levy of 
taxes on each $too valuation was $1 40. 

ADDITIONS AND ENLARGEMENTS. 

John Wagner's original part of Mt. Vernon was laid off March n, 
1 816. It included the territory bounded by Mill, Water, Mulberry 
and Fourth streets. On October 5, 1833, Darius North petitioned 
the County Board of Justices to vacate this addition, and an order was 
drawn by that body grantiug the prayer of the petitioner. 

Aaron William's original part of Mt. Vernon, laid off March 23, 1816, 
was bounded by Walnut, Store, Water and third streets, including the 
public square. 

M. F. Green's part of Mt. Vernon was laid off June 4, 1841, and 
enlarged May 10, 185T, which embraced the territory bounded by 
Main, Store, Seventh and Ninth streets. 

John Given's part (resurvey) was laid off in 1840, and extended 
from Water to Second and from Chestnut to Pearl streets. 

Jesse Y. Welborn's part, laid off May 10, 18 19, included the 
wharf and that territory bounded by Mill Creek, on the West, Fifth 
street on the North, and Walnut street, on the East, and Water street 
on the South. On November 26, 1822, an addition to this part was 
made by Mr. Welborn, which embraced the blocks between Walnut, 
Mulberry, Water and Sixth streets. On the 29th of June, 1826, another 
addition was made by him, including the blocks between Walnut, 
Mulberry, Sixth and Eighth streets. 

With the exception of those parts laid off by John Givens and M. 
F. Green, these parcels of land were in the tract purchased by Aaron 
Williams, on July 1, 1817, of Gen. Harrison, for the sum of 8500. 

The tract contained 185 acres, and it lay East of Mill Creek. As 
will be seen, John Wagner and Aaron Williams had laid off their 
parts before the transfer of the property had been made to the latter 
gentleman, and this fact occasioned some dispute as to the right of 
ownership. In the course of a few years, after satisfactory settlement 
had been made between the parties, the land belonging to Aaron 
Williams, 72*4 acres, was sold to eight persons named below, for $3,500, 
and between the parties a resurvey in 18 19 was inaugurated by this com- 
pany of land owners, which was styled the "Mt. Vernon Company," 
who decided that that part of the town lying East of Mill Creek, West 
of Mulberry, South of Eighth and North of Water streets, should be 



HISTORICAL SKETCHES. 63 

designated as "Williams," by which name it is now known. The Mt. 
Vernon Company was composed of Jesse Y. Welborn, John Burlison, 
Aaron Burlison, Matthew Williams, Wm. Crabtree, Samuel Gill, (who 
came to the county in 1807, from. Kentucky, and was the first to en- 
ter land on Indian Creek,) Aaron Bacon and Thomas E. Casseberry, 
who donated the block to the County on which the Capitol of Posey 
now stands, but there is no instrument of writing in existence that can 
establish the fact. It is a matter of tradition only. At a meeting of 
the Board of Justices, held at Springfield, Thursday, May 10, 1825, 
Richard Daniel, of Knox County, and James Stewart and James 
Smith, of Gibson County, Commissioners, appointed under an act of 
the General Assembly of the State of Indiana, approved February 12, 
1826, to locate the seat of justice of Posey County, presented the fol- 
lowing report, as the result of their labors : 

"We, the undersigned, beg leave to report that, on having met at 
Springfield, Monday, May 2, 3825, agreeable to law, and being duly 
sworn to discharge the duties assigned us as Commissioners, proceeded 
to examine into the situation of the said County of Posey, and on 
finding donations could be procured, which, in our opinion, would be 
sufficient to defray the expense of erecting good and sufficient build- 
ings suitable tor said County in a more advantageous situation for the 
interest of the people of said County, have procured said donations 
to be made, and thereupon have and do relocate the seat of justice of 
said County of Posey, in the town of Mt. Vernon, on the elegant 
situation known and designated on the plat of said town by the name 
of the public square. [signed,] James Smith, 

James Stewart, 
Richard Daniel." 

As the property was owned in that year by the company referred 
to, the natural inference would be that the public square was a gift to 
the County from them. With the view of transferring the County- 
seat from Springfield to Mt. Vernon, the Representative from this 
County, Jesse R. Craig, introduced a bill at the Legislature which was 
in session in 1824-5 lor the relief of persons owning lots in Spring- 
field who might sustain losses in the depreciation of real estate by the 
consequent removal of the seat of justice. On May 7, 1827, nearly 
two years after Mt. Vernon became the county seat, James Black, 
Urban Marrs and John Graddy were appointed Commissioners to 
assess the damages accruing from the removal. The reported amount 
of damages was $1,313, which was paid to the several lot owners by 
the County Treasurer. 

In the year 1849 David T. Kimball laid off that part of Mt. Vernon 
known as Bellville, and subsequently an addition was made by him 



/ 



64 HISTORICAL SKETCHES. 

that embraced the territory extending from section line 9 to Fourth 
street, thence West to the line between sections 8 and 9, thence South 
to Third street, thence East to Maple street, thence to Sycamore street. 

Robert Dale Owen, November 21, 1836, laid off that part of Mt. 
Vernon which included the area of land beginning at Sycamore and 
Walnut streets and running to Water, thence to Mulberry, thence 
North to Fourth, thence East to East street, thence along Section line 
between sections 8 and 9 to the Ohio river, thence along the river to 
place of beginning. His addition in January, 1874, included the block 
between Canal, Locust, Sycamore and Ohio streets. 

James & Hovey's enlargement was laid off April 26, 1850, which, 
with an addition of March 9, 1851, embraced all lots lying between 
Sixth and Ninth streets and Mill Creek and Store street. 

Wm. C. Saunder's enlargement, laid off March 15, 1851, included 
all lots between the line dividing sections 8 and 9, from the West end 
of Bluff to Water street, thence East 363 feet. 

Wm. W. Welborn's enlargement was laid off June 7, 1853, and was 
bounded by Second, Third, Pearl and Munchhoff streets. 

Wm. J. Lowry's addition of May 25, 1851, included the block be- 
tween Mill and Store, Eighth and Ninth Streets. 

E. T. Sullivan's part of January 3, 1851, was the. block bounded 
by Fourth, Fifth, Mulberry and \i f S^M : streets. 

J oh A. Mann, May, 1869, laid off blocks between Wolflin, Barter, 
First and Second streets. 

Munchhoff and Wolfiin's Enlargement of April 22, 1866, comprised 
the four blocks lying between Water, Second, Munchhoff and Pearl streets. 

N. G. Nettelton's enlargement of August, 1869, was bounded by 
Pearl, Nettelton, Second and Fourth streets. 

Wm. Nettelton's enlargement of May 6, 1868, included four and 
one-half blocks West of Wolflin and the block between Second, Fourth 
and Nettelton streets. 

Wm. P. Edson's subdivision of October 17, 1871, included nine 
lots in Kimball's part. 

John A. Mann's addition to Wm. Nettelton's enlargement embraced 
twenty-six lots lying between Second and Third streets and East of the 
line dividing sections 7 and 8. 

John M. Barter's enlargement of April 26, 1868, included the half 
block lying on Walnut, between Eighth and Tenth streets. 

Charles Leunig's enlargement of August 17, 1871, embraced four 
acres North of Eleventh and West of Main streets. 

Benjamin Lowenhaupt's additional enlargement of 1880, was one 
acre between Mulberry, Locust, Fourth and Fifth streets. 

On December 14, 1852, Wm. J. Lowry's enlargement included all 
the lots between Eleventh, Mill, Main and Eighth streets. 



HISTORICAL SKETCHES. 65 

Lowry and Larkin's enlargement of April, i860, included lots 
bounded by Third, Sixth and Munchhoff streets and Mill Creek. 

Company's (consolidated) enlargement, of February 16, and Au- 
gust 12, 1866, and of February 28, 1868, embraced all lots East of 
Walnut, in section 5 and North of section 8. 

Mann and Barter's enlargement of February 1, 1870, (re-survey) 
included all blocks between Eleventh street, Lincoln avenue, Locust 
and Canal streets. 

" School enlargement of September 21,1 869, included blocks between 
Locust, Canal, Fourth and Fifth streets. 

Mann and Barter's enlargement of May, 1869, embraced lots be- 
tween Kiset, Second, Wolflin and Barter streets. 

Joseph F. Welborn's enlargement consisted of one-half block lying 
between Fifth, Sixth, Canal and Mulberry streets. 

CHURCHES. 

The first minister of whom we have any account was the Rev. 
Samuel Jones, a Baptist. Services, previous to the erection of a 
church building, were held at private houses. In the year 18 14, a 
small log house for purposes of divine worship was built on the land 
which is now known as Templeton's graveyard. In those days wolves 
were numerous and dangerous, and, as a protection to their lives, 
worshipers found it necessary to take their guns to church with them. 
When the small brick building on the corner of Main and Sixth streets 
was built (1828) the services of all denominations were held at that 
place and in the Court House until 1840, when the Christian Church 
was erected on the North side of Fifth, between Main and Walnut 
streets. The lot was deeded to the Trustees, Wm. Hendricks, James 
Moore and Elijah Gooding, by Aaron Baker. Elijah Gooding deliv- 
ered the first sermon and occupied the pulpit as the first pastor of the 
church. It is now occupied by the Jews as a Synagogue. With the 
increase of population the congregations of the various denominations 
augmented, and, in order to accommodate them, it was found neces- 
sary to secure more room. The Methodists were the next to withdraw 
their ''patronage" from the "little old brick," and in the year 1840 
erected a building of their own on the North side of Fourth, between 
Walnut and Mulberry streets. They continued to increase quite 
rapidly and for that reason found it again necessary to build. They 
accordingly purchased a lot on the West side of Walnut, between 
Fourth and Fifth streets, and in the year 1853, erected the building 
which is occupied by them at the present time. In the year following 
the sale of their first church was effected and the property passed into 
the hands of the German Methodists, who still use it as a place of worship. 



66 



HISTORICAL SKETCHES. 



The Presbyterian denomination, in 1851, constructed a small 
frame on the West side of Store, between Fourth and Fifth streets, 
whose pastor was the Rev. Mr. Tiffany. Services were held in this 
building until the year 1872, when a new and elegant brick structure, 
costing $10,000, was erected on the South side of Sixth, between 
Main and Walnut streets, the Rev. John Gourley, a Canadian minis- 
ter, being the first pastor. 

The Roman Catholic Church founded the fifth religious denomina- 
tion at Mt. Vernon. In the earlier periods of the city's history, the 
Catholic residents were supplied by mission priests, and the services 
were conducted at the residences of the members of that denomina- 
tion. In 1856 the Rev. Roman Weinzoeflin organized St. Matthews 
Church, with twelve families and seventy-five members. The Church 
was erected on the East side of Walnut, between Fourth and Fifth 
streets. It was a small brick, and it was also used for school purposes 
until 1867, when a large frame on the same lot was constructed, at a 
cost of $2,500, in which to educate the youth. In the year 1879 it 
was found imperative to enlarge the accommodations for the congrega- 
tion, and in that year on the same premises a handsome edifice, cost- 
ing $10,000, was built, and Father J. J. Schoentrup was placed in 
charge as rector. In 1881, there were connected with the Church 
eighty-five families and 500 members. The new building is built of 
brick, in Gothic style, and has a capacity of 600. Its interior is very 
tastily and neatly arranged, and much credit is due the denomination 
for the energy and enterprise they have shown in its construction. 

The Lutherans built a small frame on the East side of Mulberry, 
between Fifth and Sixth streets, in 1856, and is used by them at this 
time. 



SCHOOLS. 

The first school house in the County, a small log building, with 
puncheon floor, was built at McFaddin's Bluff (now Mt. Vernon) in 
the year 1814, on the Southeast corner of the Public Square. The 
first one to teach the "young ideas how to shoot" was Mr. Thomas 
Heady. The only pupils of this adventurous pedagogue living are 
Win. Hendricks and Genl. A. P. Hovey. The second building used 
for educational purposes was also a small log house of rude construc- 
tion. It was removed from Springfield in 1825 and located on the lots 
now occupied by Daniel Rosenbaum's new residence. Its shingles, 
doors and logs were fastened together by wooden pins, hinges and 
nails being considered too costly to be used. "Reading, 'riting and 
'rithmetic" were the principal studies. Wm. Hooker had the honor of 
being the first to occupy the building as teacher. The increase of 



HISTORICAL SKETCHES. 67 

population demanded, in a few years, a more imposing structure, and 
the small brick on the N. E. corner of Main and Sixth streets, in 1828, 
was built. It was in this small building where Gen. Hovey, Judge 
W. P. Edson and other prominent citizens received the first rudiments 
of education, and where in later years both the gentlemen named 
"wielded the birch" as instructors. John Weathers was the first to 
teach in this "temple of learning." The next building erected for 
school purposes was the "Seminary/' which stands near the L. & N. 
Railway depot, Samuel Annable being the first teacher. 

The efficiency and rapid advancement of our admirable system of 
free public schools are largely owing to the energy and administrative 
ability of A. J. Snoke, Esq., the first Superintendent, through whom 
their organization was effected in 1870. The schools are under the 
supervision of a Board of Trustees, composed of Elijah M. Spencer, 
John Pfeffer and Wm. C. Fuhrer, the former gentleman being President, 
while the latter holds the position of Secretary and Treasurer of the 
board at the present time. The total number of pupils enrolled in 
December, 1881, was 814, and the present Superintendent is W. I. 
Davis. The high school building was constructed at a cost of $17,000 
in 1868, by Edward Brown, a carpenter, and Thomas Allen, a brick 
mason, contractors, and in the year following the Central and Western 
school buildings were erected by Edward Brown, contractor, at a cost 
of $5,500 each. Besides these„there is a colored school taught in the 
"Seminary" building. The schools of Mt. Vernon at this time com- 
pare favorably with those of other cities. The teachers are efficient 
and are advancing the interests of education to a flattering degree. 
The schools are divided into primary, intermediate, grammar and high 
school departments, with a term of three years in each, from which a 
number of pupils have graduated with highest honors. The present 
teachers employed are: G. H. Welker, principal of the high school; 
J. B. Tate, of the grammar department; Miss Mary Jones, of the sixth 
grade, grammar department; Miss Fannie Hinch, third grade interme- 
diate ; Miss Eunice Sullivan, Second primary ; Miss Ida Edson, first 
primary; Rev. S. Hecht, teacher of German ; Silas G. Howard, fifth 
primary; Miss R. J. Proteus, fourth primary; Thomas McArthur, 
third primary, and Miss Melissa Musselman, Second primary. 

THE FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

The city was without a regularly organized fire department until 
October 28, 1880. At that time an engine, costing $1,400, and supplied 
with several hundred feet of hose, was purchased by the Board of 
Common Council, and a company was created, with the following 
officers: John P. Paul, Chief; Eugene A.Wilson, First Assistant; 



68 HISTORICAL SKETCHES. 

Andrew J. Ashworth, Jr., Second Assistant; JohnC. Leffel, Secretary; 
Sylvester E. Harp, Treasurer, and Alonzo Hendricks, hose director. 
Several years previous to the incorporation of Mt. Vernon as a city, a 
hook and ladder company was organized, but its existence was of 
short duration. 



Very few fires occurred in the town previous to the years 1872-3. 
In the winter of those years the most destructive fire in its history at 
that time visited the place, when four brick stores on and near the 
corner of Main and Water streets were consumed. Soon afterwards, 
on the 26th of February, 1873, the lar g e flouring mill and distillery 
owned by Munchhoff & Wolflin, was destroyed by the awful ele- 
ment. On the 2d of May, 1874, the flouring mill of John R. Evert- 
son was destroyed also. 

On October 19, 1880, was when the greatest conflagration the town 
ever experienced occurred. All the buildings fronting on Main, from 
Second to Third streets, excepting the one on the corner of Second 
street, were swept away, entailing a loss of $150,000, on which there 
was an insurance of $100,000. The buildings have all been replaced by 
substantial and elegant two-story brick edifices. The owners of the 
property destroyed, were Fuhrer, Boyce & Co., M. Harlam, Mrs. 
John Burtis, George Henrich, Mt. Vernon Banking Co., Elwood 
Smith, Henry Moll, John D. Hinch, E. W. Rosenkrans and Charles 
F. Leonard. 

RAILROADS. 

MT. VERNON & GRAYVILLE AND C. & S. I. 

A petition, signed by one hundred freeholders of the County, was 
presented to the Board of Commissioners, composed of Wm. Robb, 
Richard Harris and Stinson Cox, asking that body to order an election 
for the appropriation of $100,000 to aid the Mt. Vernon & Grayville 
Railroad in its construction through the County, the amount asked 
being less than two per centum of the taxables on the duplicates of 
the County. The election for this subsidy was held and carried on 
July 27, 1869, when the Commissioners ordered the Treasurer to make 
a levy of eighty cents on each $100 of the valuation of all property 
for 1870, and for 1871, sixty cents on the same amount. The full 
amount of the taxes was collected, and after the company had consol- 
idated with the Grayville & Mattoon Railroad it became known as the 
Chicago & Southern Illinois Railway Company, to whom, after com- 



HISTORICAL SKETCHES. 69 

pleting five miles of the road, $20,000 of the tax was paid. Before 
the second installment of $50,000 was due an injunction was filed by 
sub-contractors restraining the Commissioners from making any further 
allowance until their claims had been satisfied. The contractors were 
unable to proceed further with the work owing to financial embarrass- 
ment, and the road was immediately placed in the hands of a Receiver, 
who sold the iron, in 1875, to parties in New Jersey under a fore- 
closure of mortgage. The iron and one locomotive were taken up 
and the enterprise was abandoned. Besides the payment of $20,000 
by the County 'the company received $30,000 in bonds from the city 
of Mt. Vernon at the same time. The total sum to be paid by the 
city was $200,000, $50,000 of which was to be paid in private sub- 
scriptions, secured by bonds issued by Mt. Vernon as collateral, the 
contractors to receive sixty per cent, on the estimates as the work of 
construction progressed. The project of building this line had been 
discussed as early as 1856. 

THE LOUISVILLE & NASHVILLE. 

This road was organized as the Evansville, Carmi & Paducah and 
was immediately consolidated with the St. Louis & South Eastern, 
when it assumed the name of the St. Louis & South Eastern Railway, 
which received its charter in 1869. The work of construction was 
rapidly and vigorously pushed forward and by that means the company 
was enabled to finish its line ready for business by the Summer of 
187 1. It operates twenty -three miles of road in the County, including 
its side tracks, and is in a very prosperous condition. It is a great 
source of convenience to the people in the Southern portion of the 
County, as well as of pecuniary advantage to the County in general. 
It was continued under the management of its consolidation until 
1880, when the present company effected a lease of its privileges, by 
which its system was greatly improved and by which its power has 
become largely increased. The road ran its line through Mt. Vernon 
on condition that a subsidy of $102,000 be paid; a proposition that 
was readily accepted, and the amount, in bonds, was issued imme- 
diately after the terms of the contract were complied with. 

NEWSPAPERS. 

The Mt. Vernon Courier, the first paper published in the town, was 
established by Thos. F. Prosser in the Spring of 1838, who continued 
its publication until 1841, when it was discontinued -on account of the 
electioa of Mr. Prosser to the position of County Auditor. During 
the interregnum occurring from 1841 to 1848 the town was without a 



7° 



HISTORICAL SKETCHES. 



paper. In the latter year Mr. Prosser started the South Western 
Advocate, which was independent in politics and which was continued 
until 1862, when its existence ceased. It was edited with rare ability 
and presented a neat typographical appearance. In that year Chas. 
L. Prosser, a son of Thos. F. , founded the Union, a folio of four pages 
and Republican in politics. It was discontinued in April, 1869, when 
the proprietor accepted the position of U. S. Gauger. 

Rev. Thomas Abbott, a Universalist preacher, established The 
Umpire in January, i860, which advocated the cause of Republicanism 
zealously until the close of the year, when it was removed to Rockport. 
In the month of July, 1871, Mr. Abbott again embarked in the news- 
paper business by establishing the Neiv Republic, which, in December 
of that year, he sold to S. T. Palmer, who changed its name to the 
Republican, which remained under his management until July, 1872, 
when Chas. L. Prosser became its proprietor. It was soon afterward 
leased to Messrs. John Mason and Virgil Veatch, and in the Summer 
of 1873, Mr. Prosser again assumed the control, who discontinued its 
publication in 1877. 

Mr. Abbott established The Harbinger, an advocate of the doctrine 
of Universalism, in August, 1871, when the paper was removed to St. 
Louis. It was an eight-page, four-column quarto. 

The Democrat, founded by a Mr. Huckeby in t86i, soon passed 
successively into the hands of Wm. Loudon, Van B. Jolley and Chas. 
Legge. Its existence was limited to a few years. 

In November, 1867 Thomas Collins established the Mt. Vernon 
Democrat, an ultra Democratic publication, which he continued to 
manage until April 7, 1879, when it was purchased by Albert A. Sparks, 
who is the present proprietor. It is an eight-page quarto, presents a 
neat typographical appearance, is a spicy, well conducted journal and 
is the official paper of the county. 

The Wochenblatt, the first and only German paper ever published 
in the County, was established by John C. Leffel, October 23, 1875, 
under whose proprietorship it continued until October, 1881, when it 
suspended. 

The Western Star was established by John C. Leffel February 22, 
1877, who disposed of an interest soon afterward to S. Jett Williams, 
who are still the proprietors. It is the only paper in the County 
whose edition was ever run off by a steam power press. Typographi- 
cally it is decidedly superior to the average country paper. 

The Sun was established by James M. Barter in 1878, under whose 
management it has been pecuniarily successful, having a large subscrip- 
tion-list and advertising patronage. 

The Posey County Republican, a staunch advocate of Republican 



HISTORICAL SKETCHES. 7 I 

principles, was established by C. F. Wertz on June 4, 1880. It is a 
well edited paper and is conducted in a bold and fearless manner. 

The Posey Banner, a folio, was established by Thomas Collins 
January 28, 1881. It is Democratic in politics and is issued weekly. 

BENEVOLENT ORDERS, SOCIETIES, ASSOCIATIONS, ETC. 



Mt. Vernon Lodge, No 163, F. & A. M., was organized March, 
29, 1854, by virtue of a dispensation issued by the Most Worshipful 
Grand Master of Masons of the State of Indiana, dated March 11, 
1854, by the following named persons: Charles Fitch, Thomas New- 
man, John Barter, Richard Barter and Adam Lichtenberger, of Mt. 
Vernon; H. C. Cooper and Win. A. Twigg, ot New Harmony, and 
W. A. McRae, D. A. Farnsly, T. Poindexter and W. Hubbell, of Ev- 
ansville. The Lodge continued under dispensation until May 15, 
1854, when it was regularly chartered by the Grand Lodge of Indiana, 
the first meeting having been held May 24, following. The first offi- 
cers were Charles Fitch, Master; John Barter, S. W., and Thomas 
Newman, J. W. The Lodge was in a prosperous condition in 1867, 
when it undertook the erection of a temple suitable to its wants, the 
hall it occupied on the West side of Main, near Water street, being 
considered too saiall and inconvenient. The temple was built at the 
Northeast corner of Store and Second streets, at a cost of $28,000, 
which involved the Lodge so deeply, that they found it impossible to 
liquidate, and the building was finally sold to private parties. The mem- 
bership from its organization to the present time has been about 330, 
while there are at present 89 enrolled as members. The Lodge meets 
regularly every Monday evening, at the Northeast corner of Second 
and Store streets. The present officers are : S. H. Pearse, W. M.; 
I. T. Slygh, S. W; George Henrich, J. W ;' Alex Crunk, Treasurer; 
R. F. Larkin, Secretary; A. Ed. Harlam, S. D.; T. J. Allen, J. D; D. 
H. Greathouse and H Kleiner, Stewards; M. Harlam, John Pfeffer, 
Sen., and A. J. Clark, Trustees, and John Doyle, Tyler. 



The first Lodge instituted in the County was at this place, on 
Febuary 21, 1848, by R. W. Dunbar, D. D. G. M. of District No. 5, 
with the following charter members: L. H. Floyd, J. L. Cary, Wm. 
Nightwine, D. S. Martel and John Conyngton, on whom the five 
degrees of the Order were conferred at that time; and four were initi- 
ated and received all the degrees the same night. The Lodge became 



72 HISTORICAL SKETCHES. 

defunct and surrendered its charter in May, i860. It was reorganized 
March 13, 1867, by Hiram Nelson, Grand Warden, under the same 
name and number, viz: Mt. Vernon Lodge, No 49. The charter 
members, under the reorganization, were: John A. Mann, M. 
S. Blunt, Elijah Evison, John D. Hinch, John Conyngton, Absalom 
Mackey, W. P. Daniel, H. C. Chase and Robert Whittelsey. The 
present officers are: L. J. Larkin, N. G. ; Phillip Robb, V. G. ; A. A. 
Sparks, Rec. Sec'ty; Wm. Large, Per. Sect'y; Joseph K. Cralley, 
Treasurer; Ghas. Schutz, L. W. Jones and Nicholas Joest, Trustees; 
Chas. J. Carpenter, R. S. N. G. ; Jno. Paul, L. S. N. G. ; Michael 
Rosenbaum, R. S. V. G.; Daniel Truempe, L. S. V. G. ; W. Hinch, 
R. S. S. ; Alex Crunk, L. S. S ; S. Lowenthal, Warden ; Isaac Gill, 
Conductor; Jno. Doyle, O. S. G ; Jacob Rosenbaum, I. S. G., and 
A. C. Fogas, D. D. G. M. The Lodge is in a prosperous condition and 
meets regularly every Thursday night at its hall on the N. E. corner 
of Store and Second streets. The present membership of the Lodge 
is 89. while the records show that 213 have been initiated and admitted 
on card since its organization. 

POSEY COUNTY MEDICAL SOCIETY. 

The object in organizing this society was to promote the interests 
of science and to establish certain rules for the government of the 
resident physicians of the County. It was organized December 20, 
1877, with the following officers . President, Edward Murphy ; Vice- 
President, A. W. Spain; Treasurer, Edwin V. Spencer; Secretary, 
S. H. Pearse, and, Censors, M. S. Blunt, W. M. Holton and Cyrenus 
Elliott. The present officers are: President, W. M. Holton; Vice- 
President, John B. Weever: Treasurer, D. C. Ramsey; Secretary, S. 
H. Pearse, and Censors, L. B. Bitz, O. T. Schultz and C. Hicks. 

GERMAN AID SOCIETY. 
{BENEVOLENT.) 

The organization of this society occurred on November 7, 1857. 
The first officers were: John Schiszley, President; Henry Brinkman, 
Vice-President; William L. Stritter, Secretary, and John Pfeffer, Sr., 
Treasurer. The present officers are: Xavier Neftzger, President; C. F. 
Tente, Vice-President; Wm. L. Stritter, Secretary, and Henry Dex- 
heimer, Treasurer. The election of officers is held semi-annually, and 
the society meet at their hall on the North-west corner of Main and 
Third streets on the first Thursday of every month. The society is 
in a very prosperous condition, having in the treasury $1,500, notwith 
standing they have paid in benefits the sum of $6,000. 



HISTORICAL SKETCHES. 73 

BLACK TOWNSHIP CEMETERY SOCIETY. 

The society was organized January 26, i860, and filed its articles 
of association with the Secretary of State May 14th, following. The 
first officers were: John Schiszley, President; Wm. L. Stritter, Secre- 
tary, and Charles Haas, Treasurer. The Board of Directors was com- 
posed of the officers named and John Pfeffer, Sr., and Fred. Reichert. 
The present officers are: Henry Brinkman, President; W. L. Stritter, 
Secretary, and John Zimmerman, Treasurer. The Board of Directors: 
Henry Brinkman, John Zimmerman, John Pfeffer, Jacob Bischoff and 
Charles Krei. The society bought two acres of land of Valentine 
Shryock, February 22, i860, and on April 17, 1863, purchased two 
acres more, two miles North of Mt. Vernon, where they have made 
many improvements, having built a vault in 1879 m which to deposit 
bodies, costing $600. The society is very prosperous, notwithstanding 
numerous outlays of money. 

HARUGARI LODGE, NO. 244. 
(GERMAN BENEVOLENT.) 

The charter members of this society were: John Pfeffer, Sr., Eman- 
uel Wolf, Wm. L. Stritter, John D. Dieterle, Charles Wasem, Phillip 
Traudt, Gregori Brill, C. F. Tente, Charles Rosenhauer and Adolph 
Matzdorf. The first officers were: John Pfeffer, Sr., O. B. ; Charles 
Wasem, U. B. ; Wm. L. Stritter, Secretary ; C. F. Tente, Treasurer ; 
Phillip Traudt, Conductor; Emanuel Wolf, Warden, and A. Matzdorf, 
R. S. O. B. The pressnt officers are: O. T. Schultz, O. B. ; Charles 
Rhein, U. B. ; Charles Wasem, Secretary; Wm. L. Stritter, Permanent 
Secretary; Emanuel Wolf, Treasurer; C. F. Tente, Conductor; Henry 
Bertram, Warden ; Louis Wasem, R S. O. B. ; Charles Scmidt, L. S. 
O. B. ; Louis Uhde, R. S. U. B. ; Henry Tillman, L. S. U. B. and 
Conrad Maier, I. S. 

The Lodge was instituted October 12, 1871, by Deputy Grand O. 
B. Henry Sittel, of Jefferson ville and the place of its first meetings were 
in Bischoff s Hall, S. E. corner Second and Store streets. The place 
of meeting at present is in the Masonic Hall and the time is every 
Friday evening. Election of officers occurs semi-annually. 

LIEDERKRANZ. 
(MUSICAL ) 

This society was organized June 20, 1877, and is the outgrowth of 
the Casino, organized February 3, 1869, and the Orpheus, organized 
in 1870. Its objects are the cultivation of music and mutual enjoy- 



74 HISTORICAL SKETCHES. 

ment. Its first officers were : Phillip Traudt, President ; C. F. Tente, 
Secretary ; Chas. Wasem, Treasurer and Jacob Walter, Librarian. 
The present, officers are: Louis Wasem, President; Chas. Wasem, 
Treasurer and Phillip Traudt, Secretary. The election of officers 
occurs annually, and the society meets every Wednesday evening at 
the N. W. corner of Main and Second streets. 

manufacturers' aid society. 

The object in organizing this society was to "aid and encourage 
manufacturers in the city of Mt. Vernon.'" It was organized on March 
30, 1874, and held its meetings at the Southeast corner of Store and 
Second streets until May 3, 1880, when the society disbanded. The 
first officers were: Henry Brinkman, President; C. F. Tente, Secre- 
tary, and Charles Cook Treasurer, with a board of directors composed 
of nine members. 

The town is beautifully situated on a natural esplanade, and is sur- 
rounded by a fertile and picturesque country. It is and has been for 
many years past the shipping point and entrepot of an area of territory 
covering one hundred square miles. Its products are principally ship- 
ped to Southern ports, though the tide of export has begun to move 
towards Eastern cities. Thousands of barrels of flour and hominy an- 
nually leave the place, while tons of hay and corn find their way to 
the leading markets of the world from Mt. Vernon. Until recently 
millions of feet of superior Walnut lumber were shipped from this 
place but continual incursions into the forests by the lumbermen have 
almost exhausted the supply of that timber. The sidewalks of the town 
are nearly all laid with brick, while the principal business and residence 
streets are McAdamized and graveled. There are a number of pleasant 
private homes and "temples of trade," all doing well. 

With the completion of the various lines of railway under course of 
construction and projected, it is confidently anticipated that Mt. 
Vernon will witness a development such as has been enjoyed by few 
of the cities of the State. Her destiny cannot be considered otherwise 
than bright. Her horoscope foretells a flattering growth and plainly 
marks out an encouraging course as a manufacturing and commercial 
city. Before the next decade shall have been chronicled in the book 
of time the number of her inhabitants, barring the acts of Providence, 
must reach, if it does not exceed, 7,000. 

The sanitary condition is excellent, made so no doubt by the 
advantages of natural drainage. The elevation is, according to a 
survey of the U. S. Navigation Engineering Corps, forty feet above 
that of Evansville, and several feet above that of any other place on 
the Ohio river below Cincinnati. The place wants a population made 



HISTORICAL SKETCHES. 75 

up of energetic, enterprising, hospitable people and to all such it extends 
a hearty and cordial welcome. "Whomsoever will, if he be of good 
report, let him come." 

There are in Mt. Vernon at this time three flouring mills, a hominy 
mill, two saw mills, eight blacksmithing and wagon-making establish- 
ments, twelve grocery stores, twenty-one saloons, three drug stores, 
three hardware stores, six dry goods and clothing stores, four barber 
shops, two banks, four harness and saddlery shops, two gunsmiths, 
four hotels, two bakeries, one cigar and tobacco shop, six millinery 
and dress-making establishments, two boot and shoe stores, two book 
stores, one dentist, eight physicians, ten lawyers, one telegraph office, 
a telephone exchange, one express office, one cooper shop, one furni- 
ture store,, one tile factory, five churches, three graded two-story brick 
school houses, three cabinet-making shops, several carpenters, brick 
masons, plasterers and brick manufacturers, two restaurants, three 
billiard halls, two confectioners, four newspapers, several painters, 
Masonic, Odd Fellows', Harugari, Liederkranz and A, O. U. W. 
societies, two brass bands, three meat markets, three livery and sale 
stables, three merchant tailors, one tin shop, five shoe-making shops, 
one foundry, three grain houses, one wholesale grocery store, two coal 
yards and one public hall. The census report of 1880 placed the pop- 
ulation of the place at 3,970, and there is a bright prospect for the 
completion of two lines of railway, in addition to the one already in 
operation, which are mentioned elsewhere. 

NEW HARMONY, HARMONY TOWNSHIP. 

SETTLEMENT OF THE RAPPITES A PECULIAR BUT EXCELLENT CLASS OF 

PEOPLE SALE OF PROPERTY TO AND SUCCESSION OF ROBERT OWEN 

— DISTINGUISHED MEN NEWSPAPERS POSTMASTERS — SECRET 

AND OTHER SOCIETIES THE PLANK ROAD THE 

TOWN'S GROWTH AND CONDITION. 

No place in the County has a more interesting history than New 
Harmony, and it is probably more widely known than any other town 
of its size in the country, solely due to the relations which the Rappites 
and the Owens bore towards it. In 1805 Michael Hahn and George 
Rapp, dissenting from the doctrines of Lutherianism, were made the 
objects of persecution by the supporters of that religious faith until 
they were, for personal liberty, compelled to seek a land where they 
could promulgate the tenets of their peculiar belief without restriction. 
Early in that year ' ' three ship-loads of colonists, under Rapp's leader- 
ship," left their home in Wurtemberg, Germany, and sailed for 
America, settling in Butler County, Pennsylvania, where they pur- 



•j 6 HISTORICAL SKETCHES. 

chased lands, erected houses and began life according to the manner 
which they had previously planned. "Imitating the example which 
was first set, perhaps, by the Pythagorean College at Cretona, and 
which followed, five hundred years later, by the early Christians, they 
threw their entire possessions into a community stock, resolving thence- 
forth to have all things in common; adopted a simple and uniform 
style of dress, and built their dwellings nearly alike. Two years later, 
following Paul's suggestions, they adopted the principle of celibacy." 

In the year 1812 George Rapp visited the Southern portion of 
Indiana and was so well pleased with the Northern locality of Posey 
County that he resolved upon removing, with his colonists, to die 
present site of New Harmony. In June, 1614, he and one hundred 
others emigrated to their new home, followed by the whole, colony in 
the Summer of 1815. During the ten years of their residence in 
Pennsylvania, by steady industry and rigid economy, the colony 
accumulated considerable property, consisting of herds and flocks, a 
woolen factory and 6,000 acres of land. Before they took their final 
departure, this property was sold for $100,000 cash, though its value 
was supposed to be much greater than that sum. The colony included 
one hundred and twenty-five families, or about seven hundred persons. 
When they had erected places of business and their residences they 
gave the place the name of Harmonie, which was changed to New 
Harmony when the property was purchased by Robert Owen, a few 
years afterward, during which the Rappites acquired, by purchase and 
entry, 30,000 acres of land, of which they entered at the land office at 
Vincennes, at different periods, 17,022 acres. Robert Dale Owen, a 
man of splendid literary attainments, in his Autobiography, in speaking 
of this peculiar class, says: 

"Here they remained ten years, clearing several thousand acres of 
land, engaging in manufactures, chiefly of woolen and cotton goods; 
planting vineyards, and increasing rapidly in wealth and prosperity. 
Though comporting themselves as quiet, inoffensive citizens, they 
had several unpleasant collisions with their neighbors, the early settlers 
of the country. It was this, probably, that induced them, when 
erecting a large granary, to build its lower portion of stone, two feet 
thick, with loop-holes as in a fortress; to make the building fire-proof, 
roofing it with tiles; and to excavate a subterranean passage communi- 
cating from this fortress-granary to the large dwelling occupied by 
George Rapp and his family. The passage has fallen into disuse and 
is choked up ; but the building remains as originally put up, except 
that large windows have been cut in it. It is now occupied by the 
machinery of a thriving woolen factory. 

"They erected also, in the form of a cross, a very spacious Hall, 
chiefly used for religious meetings. On a pediment of freestone sur- 



HISTORICAL SKETCHES. 77 

mounting the principal entrance of this Hall, is still to be seen a some- 
what rude bas-relief of a rose and wreath surrounding it, the date 1822, 
and, beneath, the inscription " Micha 4, v. 8 " This building is now 
occupied partly as a produce warehouse, partly as a library room, 
and partly as the place of meeting of the ' Working Men's Institute,' a 
literary society established in April, 1838. 

" Besides Rapp's spacious dwelling (since accidentally destroyed 
by fire) and many smaller buildings, some framed and some of brick, 
the Harmonites erected four large brick buildings that were used by 
them as common lodging and boarding houses. Of these one has since 
been pulled down and the remaining three are now occupied, one as a 
hotel, another as a dry goods store and warehouse, (but containing 
also a printing office, an Agricultural Society's room, an Odd Fellows' 
Hall and a Masonic Hall,) while the third is used as a public hall, 
ball room, and occasionally as a theatre. 

"Whether because the managers of the Harmony Association found 
that the members could be more readily governed by occasional change 
of residence and occupation, or from whatever other motive, George 
Rapp, aided by his adopted son, Frederick Reichart, after a ten years' 
residence on the Wabash, determined to make another move; this time 
eastward instead of westward; and, through the agency of Mr. Richard 
Flower, of Albion, Illinois, the village of New Harmony and upwards 
of twenty thousand acres of land were sold, in 1825, for a hundred 
and fifty thousand dollars, to Robert Owen, of New Lanark, Scotland; 
a gentleman well-known as a philanthropist, and on account of his 
socialistic views. 

"Mr. Owen shared Mr. Rapp's opinion in regard to community of 
property, believing that to be the most happy and harmonious condi- 
tion of life; and he made this purchase with a view to such an experi- 
ment. He differed from Mr. Rapp on the matter of celibacy; believ- 
ing that marriage, by a simple rite and with reasonable facility of divorce 
in case of unsuitability and consequent discord, was the proper rule. 
In regard to religion he held to the largest liberty; regarding charity in 
all things as the foundation of the purest system of morals. 

'•He never succeeded, however, in carrying out an experiment based 
on these views. He founded a 'Preliminary Society,' as it was called, 
as the first step, in which the principle of common labor was partially 
introduced. In a few months the village was filled; between eight 
hundred and one thousand persons coming together from all parts of 
the Union, and some from Europe. Of these a portion, imbued with 
Mr. Owen's principles, engaged, with honest zeal, in an effort to carry 
them out; while a larger portion came seeking an easy mode of living, 
without hard work and secure from all fear of want. Others again 
there were, determined to speculate on the benevolence and confiding 



78 HISTORICAL SKETCHES. 

temper of the founder and to make private profit out a humanitarian 
enterprise. 

"With such heterogeneous materials, success even in a project far 
more feasible, would have been hopeless. Little more than a year's 
experience in the preliminary society proved sufficient to show, even 
to one so sanguine as Robert Owen, the impossibility of success. He 
abandoned the undertaking and returned to England, leaving the 
property under the management of his two eldest sons. 

"Thenceforth the career of New Harmony was similar to that of 
other Western villages; modified, however, by two peculiarities. The 
one, its isolated position; situated in what is sometimes called 'The 
Pocket,' being the delta formed near the junction of the Wabash and 
Ohio rivers; in a rich farming country indeed, but aside from any 
main line of communication and at a distance from any of the canals, 
Macadamized roads and railroads that gradually intersected the State : 
this comparative isolation causing it to make, for many years, but slow 
material progress. The other was the haven of the original experi- 
ment, working results favorable to the social harmony and to the 
literary and scientific education of the place. Many persons, some of 
distinction, attracted by Robert Owen's reputation for benevolence 
and by the philanthropic character of his enterprise, settled, at an 
early day, in New Harmony. Among these was William Maclure, a 
laborious geologist, principal founder of the 'Academy of Natural 
Sciences' in Philadelphia, who had made extensive geological and 
mineralogical collections in all the countries of Europe and in almost 
all the states of America; who, in 3826, made a considerable purchase 
of land and houses from Mr. Owen." Mr. Maclure was the author of 
"Maclures' Opinions," ''Essay on the formation of Rocks," Geology 
of the "West Indian Islands' and the "Outlines of the Geology of the 
United States." He died at St. Angel, near the city of Mexico, March 
22, 1840: aged 78 years. "There were also Thomas Say," says the 
same author, "who had accompanied, as naturalist, the United States 
expedition to the Pacific, by Major Long, and who was regarded as 
the best entomologist of his day; Charles Leseur, a French naturalist, 
engaged by the managers of the Jardin des Plantes* at Paris, to make 
for them collections in the various branches of Natural History ; Pro- 
fessor Troost, afterwards of the Nashville University ; Robert Henry 
Faunt Le Roy, one of the principal officers of the United States Coast 
Survey; together with several friends of education from Europe, in- 
cluding Joseph Neef, formerly one of Pestalozzi's professors atlverdun, 
Madame Fretageot and Wm. P. D'Arusmont, an eccentric Frenchman 
who afterwards became the husband of Francis Wright." Mrs. Mary 
D. Fretageot, a lady of great learning, came to New Harmony, at the 
request of Wm. Maclure, in 1825. She assisted that gentleman until 



HISTORICAL SKETCHES. 79 

1 83 1, when she went to Paris, returning to Mexico, where she soon 
died of cholera, at the city of Mexico. She was the mother of A. E. 
Fretageot, a former county commissioner and prominent merchant of 
New Harmony, who was the father of A. H. Fretageot, Esq. 

" Mr. Maclure," continues our author, " endowed the 'Working 
Men's Institute,' already mentioned, conveying to them a wing of the 
hall and laying the foundation for their library. He also gave a por- 
tion of his valuable collection of fossils and minerals to Dr. David 
Dale Owen, third son of Robert Owen. Dr. Owen subsequently be- 
came Geologist of the United States ; holding that position for six or 
seven years, during which time he surveyed and set off the mineral 
lands throughout a portion of the United States territory exceeding in 
extent the islands of Great Britain and Ireland. Dr. Owen and the 
members of his geological corps were in the habit of giving free lec- 
tures on scientific subjects to the inhabitants; and a year or two before 
his death, he built, at a cost of ten thousand dollars, a library, which 
is still one of the ornaments of the place. . A younger brother, Richard 
Owen, was Geologist of the State of Indiana and until recently one 
of the Professors of the Indiana State University ; While Mr. Owen's 
oldest son, Robert Dale Owen, was, successively, member of the Indi- 
ana Legislature, Trustee of the State University, member of Congress, 
Regent of the Smithsonian Institute and American Minister to Naples, 
and an author of considerable celebrity. William Michaux, an English- 
man of very retired habits and for many years a resident of the vil- 
lage, left, by his will, a thousand dollars to the public library. Alex- 
ander Maclure, a younger brother of William, also made a considera- 
ble contribution of books." So, at various times, have other citizens 
of the place contributed. 

It is stated of Michaux, that he, becoming tired of life, and not 
wishing to destroy himself by personal violence, carried a lightning 
rod and exposed himself during thunder showers, with the hope that 
Providence might gratify his wishes in that particular. But, despite 
his efforts to attract the dangerous fluid, he lived and died a natural 
death several years afterward. 

" The library now contains, as the catalogue will show, about 3,- 
400 volumes ; being upwards of four volumes for every inhabitant of 
the village proper ; the population amounting to eight hundred. It is 
doubtful if there be, in the United States, a village in which the num- 
ber of books composing its public library, bears the same proportion 
to its population. 

" These various influences have undoubtedly given tone to the 
place. Then again, surrounded by some of the finest lands in the 
State which are occupied, in part, by farmers well-to-do in the world, 
its business, of late years especially, has been considerable." 



80 HISTORICAL SKETCHES. 

Edward T. Cox, for several years State Geologist of Indiana, was 
born and raised in this place. 

"New Harmony is usually considered a very pleasant place of resi- 
dence; most of those who leave it and succeed in the world returning 
to it again. It is noted for the musical talent it contains, of which the 
cultivation is du.e in part to a lady, a native of Scotland, daughter of 
a musician of repute and herself thoroughly trained as a teacher, who 
resided here many years, in part also to Josiah Warren, an excellent 
musician, who led its band in early days, and has since become known 
as the author of a system of "Equitable Commerce." It is a place, 
too, noted for its love of country amusements — of picnics and straw- 
berry parties and blackberry gatherings and Fourth of July celebra- 
tions, and theatre-going about New Year's Day and other festival times. 
Its chief yearly festival, however, is its Agricultural Fair, one of the 
most successful in the State, occupying four or five days in the month 
of September, and usually frequented by six Or seven thousand visitors, 
some from adjoining States. The fair grounds, half a mile east of the 
village, including twenty-four acres and a covered amphitheatre that 
will seat nearly, three thousand spectators. 

"There are two churches, well attended, Methodist and Episco- 
pal; each having a prosperous Sunday school attached; the Methodist 
Sunday school having two hundred scholars, and that of the Episcopal 
church half that number. There is also a public school with some 
three hundred pupils, besides several private schools, one of these, for 
advanced students, being under the efficient guidance of the Episcopal 
clergyman. There is also a newspaper, conveying to the villagers, 
once a week, a summary of current events. 

"The village of New Harmony, one of the healthiest in the State, 
will, it is believed, well repay a visit. The traveler will come upon 
it, romantically situated in a rich, beautifully cultivated valley, sur- 
rounded by a semi-circular range of undulating hills, some as pasture, 
some covered with orchards. He will find it literally embowered in 
trees, rows of black locust marking the street lines. He will see several 
large buildings standing out above the foliage ; a granary, the woolen 
factory and two steam mills for the manufacture of corn meal; but 
chiefly the venerable Old Hall, somewhat falling to decay. He will 
find two simple churches and several dwellings bespeaking the easy 
circumstances of the owners ; but three-fourths of the houses, small 
wooden or brick buildings, standing back from the street and scarcely 
distinguishable, at a little distance, through the mass of orchard and 
shade trees that cover up the view. 

"And, after his day's journey, he can find comfoi table quarters in 



HISTORICAL SKETCHES. 8 1 

a commodious hotel, that was occupied as dormitory, half a century 
since, by the followers of George Rapp."* 

The hotel referred to by Mr. Owen was partially destroyed by fire 
in 1880, and has undergone, in rebuilding, changes that have destroy- 
ed nearly all its original architectural features. In this pleasant old 
building the early inhabitants whiled away the time during the Winter 
evenings, and it was under its substantial roof that the private dis- 
courses of many eminent men and women were found the source of 
much instruction and entertainment. 

In the year 182 1, a Mr. Schoolcraft visited New Harmony, and, in 
an article published afterwards, he said, speaking of the Rappites : 
"There is not an individual in this society, having arrived at the pro- 
per age, who does not pay his proportionate share of labor. They 
have neither spendthrifts, idlers nor drunkards, and during the whole 
period of their residence in America, about seventeen years, there 
has not been a single law suit among them. If a misunderstanding or 
quarrel happens, it is a rule to settle it before retiring to rest, thus 
literally obeying the injunction of the apostle" — "let not the sun go 
down upon thy wrath." 

During their residence of ten years at New Harmony, the Rappites 
buried about 600 of their number in the grave yard adjoining the town 
on the West, which is still owned by the society, it having been re- 
served when the sale of their lands to Robert Owen and Wm. Maclure 
occurred. 



" As the result, perhaps, of the fraternal feeling that brought many 
to New Harmony, the Odd Fellows' Order and a Masonic Lodge are 
in a flourishing state." The former society was organized and re- 
ceived its charter in January, 1851, John R. Hugo, Horatio C. Cooper, 
Joshua H. Variel, George Grant and Aaron Lichtenberger being the 
charter members. The officers were N. G. Nettleton, Noble Grand; 
H. C. Cooper, Vice Grand; John Cooper, Jr., Secretary; John R. 
Hugo, Treasurer; Michael Craddock, Inside Guardian: George Grant, 
Warden ; J. H. Variel, Conductor ; Aaron Lichtenberger, R. S. to N. 
G.; G. W. Saltzman, L. S. to N. G.; R. B. Neal, R. S. to V. G.; Robert 
D. Owen, L. S. to V. G.; John R. Hugo, G. W. Saltzman and George 
Grant, Trustees. 

The name of the lodge is "New Harmony Lodge, No. 87, 1. O. O. F." 
The name of the Masonic Order is "Arctic Lodge, No. 394, F. A. & 
A. Y. M." This society was instituted May 25, 1869, the charter 
members being James B. Cuyler, Richard Brooks, Alfred D. Owen, 

*George Rapp died at Economy, Penn., in 1847. 



82 HISTORICAL SKETCHES. 

Richard Fitzgerald, Wm. Cross, Albert Hill and George W. Engler. 
The first officers were : Alfred D. Owen, Worshipful Master ; George 
W. Engler, Senior Warden, and James B. Cuyler, Junior Warden. 

The New Harmony Encampment, No. 78, was instituted May 16, 
1866. 

The "Working Men's Institute" was organized, "in accordance 
with the suggestion of the late Wm. Maclure, Esq., in a letter on the 
subject, addressed to Mr. A. E. Fretageot," on April 2, 1838, when 
"the constitution was drawn up, approved and signed by thirty mem- 
bers. We are indebted to Mr. J. C. Wheatcroft, the librarian, for a 
copy of a sketch of the Institute, from which we take the following 
graphic account: "The first meetings of the infant Society were held 
in the Library at the residence of Mr. Alexander Maclure, as expressed 
by him in a letter to Mr. A. E. Fretageot. Mr. Maclure continued, 
until his death, to take a lively interest in the affairs of the society. 
He corresponded with each succeeding Committee on Board of 
Management, his letters exhibiting the interest he manifested in its 
welfare. In several of those letters he urged upon the members the 
benefits to be derived from the combination of an industrial school 
with the Library, stating that he would either give during his lifetime, 
or bequeath at his death, buildings and land for continuing such for- 
ever. In the last letter written by this philantropic man to the Society, 
he expresses himself as purposing to arange all the necessary prelimi- 
naries towards making those presentations on the visit to New Harmony 
which he then contemplated. But his liberal gift was never received, 
nor his visit paid, as he died on the 2 2d of March, 1840, at the village 
of St. Angel, near the city of Mexico, in the 78th year of his age. 

"On the news of his death reaching New Harmony a special meet- 
ing of the members of the Institute was held when it was unanimously 
adoyted, that in order to show respect for the memory of Mr. Maclure, 
one of the members should deliver an address expressive of their senti- 
ments. The address was, accordingly, duly delivered. 

"To form a commencement of the Library. Mr. Maclure presented 
the members with an order for the amount of a debt due to him by O. 
Rich, a bookseller in London. The sum due to him was ,£200. 
This order was duly presented to the person on whom it was drawn, 
and but partially honored, however. Upon it was received three 
hundred and sixty volumes of books bound and unbound, and imper- 
fect parts of books. The order was still unfulfilled at Mr. Maclure's 
death. 

"Mr. Alexander Maclure and his sister Miss Anne Maclure, with 
their late brother's proved intention to govern their conduct, (and 
which was afterwards confirmed by the Court,) gave a deed of the lot 
and building, since that time owned and occopied by the Institute. 



HISTORICAL SKETCHES. 83 

"The first officers elected were, Thomas Brown, President; A. E. 
Fretageot, Treasurer; C. H. White, Secretary, and John Beal, Wm. 
Cox, Sr., John Cooper, Sr., Edward Cox, Sr., and James Sampson, 
Trustees. 

"At one of the meetings of the members, one clause in the origi- 
nal draft of the constitution of the Society was amended by a vote of 
the majority of the members, as its continuance caused much misun- 
derstanding, and in its nature it was found to be exclusive and unsatis- 
factory to put in practice. Instead of Article 6th, "Any working man 
who gets his living by the labor of his hands," was substituted, "Any 
man over the age of eighteen, etc." 

It was further resolved that the term of subscription for member- 
ship should always be so low as to be within the means of all working 
men. 

"During the thirty-two years of the Society's existence the number 
of members has ranged from sixty to twenty-four ; it at present numbers 
upwards of ninety. 

"Of the young men who have grown up during the last six to ten 
years, there are twenty-six members, while the population of such in 
town, and youth fast growing up, seem to preponderate in numbers 
over those of more advanced age. In all intelligent communities the 
well-wishers of educational or intellectual progress might reasonably 
expect for a public library, countenance and support from every per- 
son who sets any value on the dissemination of knowledge. 

"Subscribers pay $ i. oo, half yearly; or if monthly subscribers, 25 
cents per month, for a less time than six months. Less payments than 
for one month not taken. 

"As subscribers, the ladies have generally been the most numerous. 
Orphan children, until eighteen years of age, are allowed the free use 
of books in the Youth's and Children's Department of the Library. 

"On the large building, at different times, a considerable sum has 
been expended. The rigorous economy necessary to supply the means 
to give interest to the library, by making an attempt to keep up with 
the supply of literature and the expense of lights and fuel, has left 
nothing for keeping the outside and the interior of the premises in the 
condition our officers would wish. The advanced price of books since 
the war, and the increasing demand for them in large families, has 
added most materially to that heavy and constantly recurring expense 
to a circulating library — book-binding. 

The library is open every Sunday and Thursday evenings, and all 
day Saturday, and by application to the Librarian, at his residence, he 
will, at any time, attend to, receive or give out books. 

The Posey County Agricultural Society was organized September 
18, 1858, electing its first officers on the 23d of October, following, 



84 HISTORICAL SKETCHES. 

who were : Magnus T. Carnahan, President; John Woody, Vice Presi- 
dent; Richard Owen, Secretary; Julius C. Miller, Corresponding Sec- 
retary, and Samuel Arthur, Treasurer. The first fair was held in Sep- 
tember, 1859. The Society now own twenty-four acres of excellent 
land, one-half mile East of New Harmony, and has $634 in the Treas- 
ury. Extensive and costly improvements have been made from time 
to time, and its condition is very flattering to the management as well 
as to the supporters of the enterprise. In 1881, the Society paid $2,- 
242 in premiums. 

NEWSPAPERS. 

The first newspaper published in Posey County was the New Har- 
mony Gazette, established by Robert D. and Wm. Owen. It was a 
weekly publication, a 16 page quarto, its first number issuing October 
1, 1825, and its last on October 28, 1828, when its name was changed 
to the New Harmony and Neshoba Gazette or the Free Enquirer, at 
which time Robert L. Jennings, Fanny Wright and Robert D. Owen, 
became the proprietors. It was continued at New Harmony until 
December 31, 1828, when the paper was removed to New York City. 
Subscription, $3 per year. 

The Disseminator, founded by Wm. Maclure, January 16, 1828, 
was an octavo of sixteen pages, and was the second paper published 
in the county. It was edited and printed by the young men of the 
School of Industry, of which Mr. Maclure was the principal. It was 
devoted to literature and science and was a very interesting publica- 
tion. Its suspension occurred May 7, 1840, having been enlarged to 
a quarto, June 18, 1834. 

The Indiana Statesman was printed and published by Alexander 
Burns, Jr., at Evansville from May 13, 1842, until October 22, of that 
year, when it was removed to New Harmony, where it was published 
until 1845. It was a folio of four pages and was a very spicy, ably 
edited sheet. 

On August 27, 1846, James Bennett established the Western Atlas , 
issued in quarto form, which suspended September 16, 1847. In 1848 
the Gleaner was issued by the same gentleman, and which ceased 
publication in the year 1849. 

The Advertiser, in 1858, was established by Charles W. Slater, who 
continued its publication until 1861, when he became a volunteer and 
entered the Federal army of the Rebellion. It was a folio of four pages 
and Democratic, politically. 

The New Harmony Register, when Mr. Slater returned from the war, 
was established in 1865 and is still in existence. It is a four-page folio, 
is Democratic in politics and is an excellent local weekly paper. 



HISTORICAL SKETCHES. 85 

PUBLIC ENTERPRISES. 

In the month of September, 1851, a plank road was built between 
Mt. Vernon and New Harmony, and for several years was a source of 
great convenience to the public, but owing to the excess of expenditures 
over the receipts in maintaining the enterprise it was found imperative 
to abandon it. John Pitcher was President ; Robert Dale Owen, Secre- 
tary and Treasurer. The board of directors was composed of N. G. 
Nettleton and Robert D. Owen, of New Harmony; John Sweeney, of 
Springfield, and Enoch R. James, Charles F. Leonard, Richard Barter 
and John Pitcher, of Mt. Vernon. The event of its completion was 
celebrated by a public and costly dinner at Mt. Vernon and a grand 
ball at New Harmony in the evening of the same day 

In the year 1881, the citizens of Harmony Township voted to the 
Peoria, Decatur & Evansville Railway an appropriation of two per 
centum of the taxable property, amounting to $15,000, besides $500 
subscribed by the Agricultural Society, for the extension of a branch 
of that line from Poseyville to New Harmony. Work was immediately 
begun and the line was completed in December, of the same year. 
By this line of road the town is connected with the railway system of 
the United States, and will no doubt have direct communication by 
this same route with Mt. Vernon, the county seat, by June 1, 1882, 
as there is a strong probability that the Company will construct a fur- 
the^extension of its line to the latter place by that time. 
f The first regularly appointed postmaster at New Harmony was 
( Romelia Baker, a Rappite, who served from 1814 to 1824, when he 
^fas succeeded by John Schnee, who, in 1836, was succeeded by Louis 
Gex, whose successor was Thomas Brown,, who continued in office 
but a short time, he having been removed upon suspicion of having 
purloined matter from the mail bags, but which was removed when his 
deputy confessed to the theft. N. G. Nettelton was appointed by 
President John Tyler to fill the vacancy caused by the removal of 
Brown, and he was succeeded by William Cox, he by William Twigg, 
he by Nelson Felch, he by Julius C. Miller, appointed by Abraham 
Lincoln, and who was succeeded by William Twigg, he by William S. 
Allen and he by Julius C. Miller, who still holds the position with 
credit. The growth of New Harmony has been slow, notwithstanding 
its many superior geographical, social and natural advantages, though - 
it is fair to presume that the interest shown by her citizens in her 
development at this time will lead to gratifying results. The seeming 
indifference to an increased growth by her citizens of past generations 
is probably the secret of her condition at this time. The place was 
incorporated in 1850, but has not maintained its town board continu- 
ally. At present there is a town government, and it is quite likely 



86 HISTORICAL SKETCHES. 

t at the enterprise of its present population will be the means of giving 
it considerable impetus to a prosperity and material growth that she 
has never before felt. 

Mr. James Sampson, a retired merchant, has, for the past thirty 
years, employed himself in the very laudable work of collecting fresh- 
water shells, fossils, etc., and he now owns the .finest private collec- 
tion of that character in the country. 

VILLAGES OF POSEY COUNTY. 

BLACKFORD, 

THE FIRST BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS — THE FIRST JAIL — AP- 
POINTMENTS AND ELECTIONS ALLOWANCES — THE FIRST TREAS- 
URER — THE FIRST ASSESSOR AND HIS EMOLUMENT 
^-THE FIRST CLERK AND HIS PAY. 

The town of Blackford was where the first seat of justice in the 
county was established, and it was laid out by the Board of County Com- 
missioners in Jauuary, 1815, where, on May 4, 1817, the proceedings 
of that body were first recorded after the location of the first seat of 
justice. Samuel Jones, at the first term of the Commissioner's Court, 
May 12; 1817, was appointed Treasurer of the County for one year, 
his bond being fixed at $4,000, with Ezekiel Saunders and Warner 
Clark, sureties; and whose report at the end of his first term of office 
shows that he paid to the Commissioners the sum of $912 41.* At 
the same term of this Court, the contract was awarded him for the 
construction of the first "gaol,''' for which he was to be paid the sum 
of $422 87^ " out of any money arising from the sale of lots in the 
town of Blackford." David Love was allowed $42 50 ; ' for assessing 
the taxable property of Posey County for 1816." On the 12th of May, 
1817, Morris Robertson was allowed $4 for killing four wolfs, June 1, 
1816, whose scalps he had preserved and produced at the time he re- 
ceived the reward. Wm. E. Stewart, the first Clerk of the County, 
was also allowed $23 50 ''for ex-officio services for the year 181 6, and 
for the rent of his office eight months," showing that the officials of 
that early period were compelled to provide themselves with offices and 
attend to the duties of their positions at very moderate salaries. 

Thomas Harp, of Marrs; Thomas Litton, of Wagnon, now a part 
of Vanderburgh; Aaron Bacon, of Black; John Graddy, of Lynn ; 
James Robb, of Robb, and Wm. Davis, of Smith, were the first ap- 

*Nicholas Joest, the incumbent of the Treasurer's office, in his report to the County Com- 
missioners, at the June term of their Court, 1881, on final annual settlement, showed a balance 
of $31,417 12, as being due to the county, which is a flattering tribute to the progress of the 
■ age, as well as a compliment to the officials who have succeeded Mr. Jones. 



HISTORICAL SKETCHES. 87 

pointments made to fill the position of Assessor for their respective 
townships. Jonathan Jeffries and Robert Allen, of Robb; Jeffrey 
Sanders and Nicholas Long, of Wagnon ; Wm. Stephens and Paul 
Casselberry, of Marrs; Adam Albright and Nathan Ashworth, of 
Black ; Samuel Eblin and Thomas Barton, of Lynn, and John Arm- 
strong and James Martin, of Smith, received the first appointments as 
overseers of the poor, one of the duties, at this time, of the township 
trustees. Thomas E. Casselberry, in May, 1817, entered into bond 
as County agent in the sum of $4,000, with Paul Casselberry, David 
A. Mills and Wm. Stevens as securities. This officer performed some 
of the duties as are now entailed upon the Sheriff and Treasurer. 

The office was abolished in 1839, and the last work was done by 
Scarborough Pentecost, who settled with the County treasurer, Wm. J. 
Lowry, May 5, 1840. The inspectors ot merchandise brought into the 
County for sale by itinerant or local tradesmen, in 181 7, were: Thomas 
Litton, for Wagnon ; Wm. Hutcheson, (father of Philo A. Hutcheson, 
incumbent of the Recorder's office,) for Marrs; John Duckworth, for 
Black; Peter Jones, for Robb; Wm. Nelson, for Lynn, and Wm. Davis, 
for Smith townships. In this same year township elections were held, 
in Marrs, at the house of Wm. Hutcheson; in Black, at the house of 
Thomas Givens; in Lynn, at the town of Harmonie; in Robb, at the 
house of Langston Drew; in Smith, at the house of George Smith, and, 
in Wagnon, at the house of Wm. Johnson. 

The seat of justice was removed from Blackford to Springfield in 
November, 1817, and on the 10th of that month the Board of Com- 
missioners convened its first term of court in that embryo village. 
Blackford had a promising future until the seat of justice was re- 
moved, when it began to wane and soon ceased its existence, and its 
site is now on the land of the heirs of George Jackson, in section 29, 
Marrs township. The town was named in honor of the Hon. Isaac 
Blackford, the first judge of the judicial district that embraced the 
County of Posey. Judge Blackford's associates on the bench in this 
County were Thomas E. Casselberry and Dann Lynn. The first case 
tried in the County before the above judges was that of Wm. Blizzard, 
on a charge of having killed two hogs, the property of Margaret Hall, 
and the first prisoner who was arraigned at Blackford was Meschack 
Green, June 19, 181 5, for the theft of a hog, for which he was fined 
$50 and received twenty-five lashes across his bare back, at the hands 
of John Carson, Sheriff of the County. 

The first panel of grand jurors was composed of Nathaniel Muncy, 
Wm. Wagnon, James Robertson, Wilson Butler, Alexander Mills, 
John Stapleton, Adam Albright, John Aldredge, Samuel Aldredge, 
James Black, Seth Hargraves, Ezekiel Jones, John B. Stephenson, 
David Thomas, John Crunk, Mathew Adams, Peter Wilkeson, Wm. 



88 HISTORICAL SKETCHES. 

Boyd, Wm. Barton, Nathan Ashworth, John Turney, Wm. Curtis, 
John Dollison, Samuel Kimmel and Solomon Nesler. 

The first/ram (now called l 'petit") jury in the County was compo- 
sed of Nicholas Long, Daniel Miller, Wm. Stevens, Joseph Fesler, 
John Barton, John Martin, Samuel Barton, Timothy Downen, John 
Ridenhouer, John McFaddin, David Mills and James Duckworth. 
The original seal of the Board of Commissioners was a pen-made circle, 
with the words "Commissioner's seal of Posey County" enclosed. 

BLAIRSVILLE, ROBINSON TOWNSHIP, 

Has a population of 200, was laid out by Stephen Blair and Ebenezer 
Phillips, July 4, 1837. The German element predominates, and the 
country surrounding it is very productive. It contains a few places of 
business, one church, a good school and has a weekly mail. 

CABORN, MARRS TOWNSHIP, 

Was named after Cornelius Caborn, by whom the village was laid out 
in 187 1. It is situated on the L. & N. Railway, six miles East of Mt. 
Vernon, has a school, a few places of business, a Methodist church 
and a population of sixty souls. 

CALVIN STATION, ROBB TOWNSHIP, 

Is on the line of the Peoria, Decatur & Evansville Railroad, one-half 
mile from Stewartsville. It is delightfully situated, has a daily mail 
and may become a place of some importance. It was laid out by 
James T. Calvin, Esq., April 21, 1881. 

CHAINVILLE, LYNN TOWNSHIP, 

Was laid out by Alexander McClure, as agent of William McClure, 
December 22, 1836, but never reached the dignity of a village. 

CYNTHIANA, SMITH TOWNSHIP, 

Was laid out by Wm. Davis, March 6, 1817. The place was named 
after two daughters of Mr. Davis, the founder. John Shanklin and 
Andrew Moffat were the proprietors of the first store, which was a 
small log cabin, and Clement Whiting kept the first tavern. The 
place is pleasantly situated on the Evansville & Terre Haute Railroad, 
twenty-four miles from Mt. Vernon, the county seat. It contains sev- 
eral places ol business, three churches and a two-story brick graded 
school house. The society is good, its sanitary condition superb, and 
its population is placed at 400 souls. 



HISTORICAL SKETCHES. 89 

FARMERSVILLE, BLACK TOWNSHIP. 

There is no official record showing when the settlement of this 
village occurred, but it is stated positively by the oldest inhabitants 
that the erection of houses and the location of lands in the vicinity 
was about the year 1813. The first settlers were from New England, 
and from this fact the name of Yankeetown, by which it is sometimes 
known, originated. It is situated on the New Harmony and Mt. 
Vernon stage road, eleven miles South of the former and four miles 
North of the latter place. The country adjacent is picturesque and 
undulating, the farms being well improved and thoroughly cultivated. 
It contains a graded school, constructed of brick, in 1875, at a cost °f 
$6,000; a store where general merchandise is vended, three churches, 
a blacksmith shop, and two physicians. It has a daily mail, and its 
support is derived from the agricultural interests. Population, 75. 

GRAFTON, LYNN TOWNSHIP, 

Was laid off by George W. Thomas, Esq , of Mount Vernon, in 1852. 
It is six miles from the county seat, has a weekly mail, contains two 
places of business and is situated in a very fertile farming section. 
Elisha Trafford, Esq., is postmaster. 

WINFIELD, HARMONY TOWNSHIP, 

Was laid out by John Cox, in October, 1838, and is sometimes called 
" Bugtown." It is a mere settlement. 

NEW BALTIMORE, BETHEL TOWNSHIP, 

Was laid off in 1837, by W. J. Johnson, but it never became even a 
village. The section of land on which the town was located was en- 
tered by James Allen, in 1819. 

POSEYVILLE, ROBB TOWNSHIP, 

CWas originally called Palestine, from Febuary 24, 1840, to 1852, when 
its name was changed. It was laid out by Talbott Sharp and Ellison 
Cale, is quite a pretty village of 350 inhabitants and is located in a 
most picturesque agricultural quarter of the County. The first store 
keeper here was Jonathan S. Jaquess and — Overton kept the first 
tavern. It is situated on the Peoria, Decatur and Evansville Rail- 
way, 24 miles North East of Mt. Vernon and has a daily mail, James 
Goslee, postmaster. It is in a flourishing condition, has a graded 



go HISTORICAL SKETCHES. 

brick schoolhouse, several places of business and three churches. The 
society of the place is very good and its sanitary condition excellent. 
The first and only paper the place has had is the Times, established 
in 1881. 

price's station, bethel township. 

Is growing quite rapidly, is situated on the Peoria, Decatur and 
Evansville Railroad, seven miles Northeast of New Harmony, has a 
daily mail and is a promising village. It was laid out by Wm. Price, 
August 11, 1881. P. O. Griffin. 

SAINT PHILLIP, MARRS TOWNSHIP. 

Is on the Louisville and Nashville Railway, 11 miles East of Mt. 
Vernon. It is well supplied with schools and churches, is in a rich 
agricultural section and has a population of 75. One of the finest 
church edifices in the County was erected at this place in 1870 at a 
cost of $10,000. Elizath Deig is postmistress, a lady who is noted for 
her liberality and Christian spirit. When the church referred to was 
completed she purchased an organ at her own expense, costing $2,000, 
and presented it to the congregation. The community is largely made 
up of German Catholics. 

ST. WENDEL 

Is in the northeastern part of Robinson township, sixteen miles East 
of Mt. Vernon, has a few places of business, a brick schoolhouse, a 
very fine church, erected at considerable cost, by the Catholic denom- 
ination, and a daily mail. Its population is placed at 175. It was 
never officially laid out, and is situated in Posey and Vanderburgh 
Counties, the line dividing the counties running through the center of 
the place. 

SPRINGFIELD, LYNN TOWNSHIP. 

Became the second seat of justice, and the official plat of which was 
recorded by David Love, on May 20, 1817, when it was laid out by 
the County Commissioners, the circumstances of the event being fully 
related under the heading "Courts of the County," found elsewhere 
in these pages. The first brick Court House in Southern Indiana was 
erected at this place by Frederick Rappe. an account of which will 
also be found elsewhere. The Court House has been remodeled and 
is now used as a schoolhouse. The village contains a church and 



HISTORICAL SKETCHES. 91 

about 125 inhabitants. Matthew Williams surveyed, Andrew Hindman 
and Thomas Wilson ''staked,'' and Wm. Alexander carried the chain 
when the town was laid off. Isaac Nettleton established the first, John 
Schnee, the second, and Samuel James, the third tavern here, and as 
it may be interesting to the reader to know under what restrictions the 
proprietors of houses of that character were placed at that day, the fol- 
lowing "rating" of the Board of Commissioners is copied from the 
order book of that body: 

"For a horse at hay twelve hours, 25 cents; horse feed (one meal), 
25 cents; one meal for a person, 25 cents; lodging, one person, 12^ 
cents; whisky, per half pint, 12^ cents; peach or apple brandy, half 
pint, 25 cents, and cider or beer, 12^ cents per quart." The license 
was $10 per annum for houses of public entertainment. Joseph 
Spaulding, in addition to his hotel, carried on a general merchandise 
business, in a log house, in the side of which was cut a hole of four 
square feet, from which was handed such articles as were purchased at 
the establishment, the patrons being compelled to stand on the outside 
of the building. It .was at this hole where a great many were supplied 
with the ardent beverage. It is related that a man, under the influence 
of liquor, attempted to crawl through the aperture for the purpose of 
avenging himself upon the person of Spaulding for some imagined 
wrong done him by "Uncle Joe," who had the man at his mercy 
when he had succeeded in getting into the opening, a fact that the 
inebriate realized when he felt the stinging blows laid on with a board 
in the hands of the proprietor of the establishment. It had the effect 
of bringing him to his senses, and he "steered clear" of the danger- 
ous hole ever afterwards. 



Formerly known as Paris, was laid out by William Stewart on October 
29, 1838, in a very eligible locality, six miles East of New Harmony. 
It contains several stores, one church and a two-story brick graded 
school house. The population is placed at 125. It has a daily mail 
by the Peoria, Decatur & Evansville Railway, whose route is one-half 
mile distant. Its inhabitants are made up of a good class of people 
and its sanitary condition is excellent. A blockhouse was constructed 
in the immediate vicinity of this village in 1809, on the farm of John Cox 
("double-head"), who, with the families ot Maxey Jolley, Thomas 
Robb, V. Leavitt and John Wallace, occupied it as a protection against 
the Indians. 

WADESVILLE, CENTER TOWNSHIP, 

Was laid out, February 17, 1853, by Daniel Leffel, James Pelt and 



92 HISTORICAL SKETCHES. 

Win. Moye, when it belonged to Robinson Township. It has several 
places of business, a church and a school house. The country sur- 
rounding the village is picturesque and the soil is quite fertile. The 
population is about ioo. 

WEST FRANKLIN, MARRS TOWNSHIP, 

Is situated on the Ohio river, twelve miles above Mt. Vernon. It 
was laid out by John B. Stinson, in January, 1837, and was for a 
number of years quite a promising village, but for some reason it has 
dwindled into a place of very limited extent, chiefly attributable to the 
presence of Caborn, a growing village on the L. and N. Railway. At 
present it contains a church, a school house, two places of trade and 
has a daily mail by the river route. Although no town was laid out 
until comparatively a very recent period, there were a great many 
settlers in the vicinity of where West Franklin now stands as early as 
181 5. It was at this point where all the emigrants from Tennessee, 
North Corolina and Georgia crossed from Kentucky when they located 
in the County. It was called at that time Diamond Island Ferry. 
Dann Lynn died here, of cholera, in 1833. 

WOODVILLE, BLACK TOWNSHIP, 

Was laid out, November 5, 1819, by W. A. L. Green, the plat of 
which, on December 14, in the same year, was revoked and its lots 
became a part of the farm adjoining the land Dr. E. V. Spencer, of 
Mt. Vernon, now owns, situated about 3 miles Northwest of the County 
seat, on the lower New Harmony wagon road. 

INCIDENTS— TRAGICAL AND OTHERWISE. 

A LIST OF MURDERS COMMITTED IN THE COUNTY AND THE ACTION TAKEN 

BY THE AUTHORITIES THE FIRST STEAMBOAT A PANTHER KILLS A 

YOUNG MAN TREATMENT OF CRIMINALS BY THE "VIGILANTES" 

KIDNAPING AND ITS RESULTS THE EARLY MILLS. 

THE CHOLERA IN POSEY. 

Within the past half-century cases of this dreadful disease have ap- 
peared on five different occasions in this country. In the year 1833 the 
disease prevailed in many quarters of the West, and in that year a num- 
ber of fatal cases occurred in this County, among the most prominent who 
were fatally attacked was Dann Lynn. In 1848 three deaths occurred. 
In 185 1 it again appeared in the form of an epidemic, during which 



HISTORICAL SKETCHES, 93 

thirty deaths were recorded, among whom was Dr. Mark Trafton. 
In 1852 there were a few fatal cases, among whom was the wife of 
Charles F. Leonard, the mother of the publisher of this work. The 
darkest and one of the most sorrowful periods in the history of the 
County was the year 1873, when the relentless disease for two long 
months performed its awful mission. That was a period which will 
be remembered with the deepest melancholy, particularly by those 
who were witnesses of the sad events that transpired. For five long 
and weary weeks coal was burned in great quantities on many corners 
in Mt. Vernon, while the gutters ran with lime and other disinfectants. 
Every thing was done to eradicate the disease, and many made heroes 
of themselves by their actions. Dr. A. Matzdorf was a martyr to the 
cause of mercy and relief. He visited victims who were writhing in 
agony and administered remedies for their relief until he was stricken 
down and succumbed to the disease which baffled medical skill. John 
C. Woody, one of nature's noblemen, during the scourge performed deeds 
most heroic when he, in the lonely vigils of the night, sat by the bed- 
side of his dying wife and dead children and used every means to allay 
the pains of the patient sufferer. The neighbors had become terror- 
stricken and it was impossible to secure assistance. The brave hearted 
and faithful man, conscious of threatened danger, remained in the home 
darkend by the death of two children and a brother until the terrible 
monster relieved his wife of her torture. He was faithful to his vow 
as a husband and showed an emulative gratitude tor the love of a pure 
and devoted wife. During the epidemic there were, according to the 
most reliable information, one hundred deaths from cholera, eighty 
occurring in the town of Mt. Vernon. We subjoin a list, with the 
dates, believing that it is correct : 

Joseph Pickles died June 7th; a daughter of George Muncey, and 
Mrs. William Miller, the 15th; a child of Mr. Roberts, the 20th; Mrs. 
Jos Sloat, the 22nd; John Caldwell (colored), the 27th; Lucy Kirk, 
a child, a daughter of Mrs. John Snyder and Mrs. Collins, the 28th; 
a daughter of Mrs. John Snyder, the 30th; Mrs. Grant, July 1st; 
Thomas Caldwell (colored), the 8th; unknown negro woman and an 
unknown pauper, the 9th; Miss Sheldon, Miss Gordon, Mrs. George 
Weilbrenner, a daughter of John Reichert, Mrs. Barker and James 
Werks, the nth; Samuel K. Bell, his mother and sister, Mrs. Helen 
Gordon, Larkin Duncan and Alvin Hovey, the 12th; Augustas Gor- 
don and a daughter of Robert Lyon, the 13th; Mrs. Conrad Shertz, 
William King and child of James McClain, the 14th; Robert -Peters 
and Mrs. S. Huff, the 15th; Taylor Woody. Orrin Johnson, child of 
J. C. Woody, Henry Osborne and wife and Robert Lyon, the 16th; 
an unknown pauper, Lewis Barton, Mrs. J. C. Woody and child, the 
17th; Joseph Harris, Mary Shertz and Mrs. Barton, the 18th; a son 



94 HISTORICAL SKETCHES. 

of Mr. Bonenberger, Katie Shertz and Mrs. Grace Craw, the 19th; 
Lettie Watkins (colored), Mrs. Timmons and Dr. A. Matzdorf, the 
20th; Mrs. Robert Lyon, Mrs. McLaughlin and Miss Eva Hovey, the 
21st; Lizzie Haas and a son of Mrs. Cook, the 22d; a son of James 
C. Dixon, an unknown negro and Mrs. McDowell, the 23d; son of 
James Davenport, the 24th; Anton Haas, John Quick, wife and child, 
the 25th; Mrs, John D. Hinch and Mrs. Musselman, the 26th; an 
unknown pauper, the 28th; Mrs. Latham, the 29th; Jeff. Hopkins, 
the 30th; a child of Isaac Newton, the 31st; John Tier, August 1st; 
Charles Kreie, the 2d; Robert Moore, the 3d; Mattie Stein and Henry 
Washington (colored), the 4th; and Joseph Clemmens and an unknown 
pauper, the 5th. 

MURDERS. 

On the 29th of October, 181 7, a young physician of much promise, 
by the name of Thomas Moore Parke, accompanied by his wife, lo- 
cated in the embryo village of Mt. Vernon, and immediately began 
the practice of his profession. Soon after his advent into that frontier 
village, a man by the name of Peter Hendricks, while riding a frac- 
tious horse, was thrown against a stump of a tree, near the corner of 
Walnut and Second streets, and killed. The young physician, for pur- 
poses of dissection, it is supposed, obtained possession of the body by 
some means and conveyed it to his stable loft, in the rear of the hotel 
now known as the European, and covered it with hay. Some one 
passing through the alley in the rear of the building referred to, acci- 
dentally discovered the feet of the corpse, and the presence of it in 
the stable of Dr. Parke caused a suspicion of body-snatching to be 
directed against him, which ended in outspoken indignation. It is 
said that Mrs. Rachel Givens, a woman of high connection, allowed 
her anger to lead her to take steps that would result in the physician's 
punishment. She employed a profligate and drunken fellow by the 
name of George Gibbons to avenge the wrong, and promised to re- 
ward him with a jug of whisky if he would personally chastise the 
doctor. Five months after his arrival, March 29, 1818, the young 
physician was crossing Second street, when Gibbons, with an ashen 
club, stealthily came up to him from behind, and struck him several 
blows,, killing him instantly. As it was the first tragic event that had 
occurred in the County, it created considerable excitement. Gibbons 
was arrested, with some difficulty, and taken to the jail at Springfield. 
He was indicted by the grand jury at the May term of the Circuit 
Court, 1818; was arraigned May 20, 1817, before David Hart, presid- 
ing judge, and was placed under bond of $1,300 for his appearance 
at the September term of the Court following, with Charity Byrd, 



HISTORICAL SKETCHES. 



95 



Bryant Byrd, Aaron Bacon, Mary Ann McFaddin, Catherine Richard- 
son, Sargent Moss, Sophia Webb, Benijah Moss, Elizabeth Webb, 
John Bradley, (who afterwards had his neck broken by falling from a 
wagon,) John Aldredge, Andrew McFaddin and Hyman Richardson, 
securities. At the same time Rachel Givens, the instigator of the 
crime, was indicted and held as an accessory , in the sum of $2,500, 
with Thomas Givens, Seth Hargraves, Nathan Smarth and David A. 
Mills, securities. Richard Daniel was the prosecutor, who, on June 
7, 1819, entered a nolle prosequi in both cases, and Gibbons and Mrs. 
Givens were discharged. 

It is said that, soon after their liberation, Gibbons and his wife were 
placed in a little boat, with provisions and poisoned whisky, and set 
afloat on the Ohio river. Gibbons partook freely of the whisky and 
he died from the effects of it in a short time afterward. Before the 
boat was beached on the rocks on the Ohio river, on the Indiana side, 
above Uniontown, the wife gave birth to a child. Gibbons was buried 
on Hovey's Lake, in an old graveyard, near the roadside. Several 
years after this event, when an old woman, Mrs. Givens started for 
California, but while enroute over the plains she was attacked by cholera 
and died, and was buried in two barrels in a valley in Wyoming Terri- 
tory. Mrs. Gibbons was afterward married to Joshua Kel Curtis, by 
whom she had five children, all of whom are highly respectable people. 

Olaves Gram, a Frenchman, in Robb township, murdered his wife, 
Cynthia, by forcing her to take three ounces of laudanum, September 
29, 1829 ; indicted by the grand jury at the February term of the Cir- 
cuit Court, 1830 ; case stricken from the docket at the September term 
of the same Court, 1834. 

Joseph Lynn, a colored desperado, in 1838, was cut and killed at 
New Harmony by some unknown person. It is generally supposed 
that the event was the result of a feud which existed between a band 
of blacks and whites, headed by Lynn, who were employed at the 
flouring mills and distillery of William and Richard Dale Owen, on 
one side, and the mechanics of the village, on the other. A general 
fight occurred on the night of the murder of Lynn, who, during the 
melee, was struck by John Webster, a noted fighter, after which the 
blacks left to arm themselves, it is presumed. They soon returned to 
the immediate vicinity to renew the affray, all of whom were armed 
with knives, guns and pistols. Not long after they appeared, as Dr. 
J. S. Mann, now of Mt. Vernon, and Webster were approaching the 
office of the former, Lynn warned them that he would shoot if they 
came any nearer, from which fact it is believed that Lynn and his 
men anticipated an attack. The warning was unheeded, however, and 
true to his promise, Lynn fired at the two men, the contents of the 
gun — nails, slugs of lead and shot — entering the bodies of the doctor 



96 HISTORICAL SKETCHES. 

and his companion, lacerating them fearfully, but fortunately without 
fatal effect. Lynn was soon afterward found dead, with ghastly cuts 
in his body, and Webster was arrested for the crime on the following 
day, but as no evidence was introduced at the preliminary examina- 
tion, held before Justice Thomas Brown, that tended to implicate him 
he was discharged. An attempt was afterwards made to fasten the 
crime upon Dr. Mann, but without success. It will probably never 
be known who committed the deed, as Webster has since died without 
leaving any evidence as to the guilt of the perpetrator. Joseph Lynn, 
the victim, by his remarkable feats of strength, justly acquired the 
reputation of a Hercules. He bore a bad character several years 
previous to his death, and it was well known that he very seriously 
cut his master, James Lynn, at Springfield. It is said that this negro 
was sold by his master three different times, and who. soon after his 
purchase, would return to his original master, and by this means he 
would become a source of profit, as well as of swindling. 

William McFadiin, on February 16, 1842, in Mt. Vernon, cut and 
killed James M. Albright; he was indicted by the Grand Jury at the 
March term of the Circuit Court; was tried, convicted and sentenced, 
by Judge Elisha Embree, at the September term of that court, 1842, 
to the penitentiary for ten years. 

James Lyon was indicted by the grand jury at the September term 
of the Circuit Court, 1851, for murdering, on March 1, 1849, Wm. 
Clayton; was defended by Judge Alvin P. Hovey, March 1, 1852, and 
acquitted. It is very generally understood at New Harmony, where 
the event occured, that the killing was accidental. Lyon threw a brick 
at some one with whom he had quarreled, which, missing that party, 
struck Clayton, fracturing his skull, from the effects of which he died 
soon afterward. 

One of the most tragical and bloody affrays that have ever been 
recorded in the history of crime occurred on the 6th of August, 1849, 
in the city of Mt. Vernon. It was an election day and party strife was 
warm and bitter, the office of Sheriff being the bone of contention. 
As was usual on such occasions, a large crowd of people had congre- 
gated in the town, and long before 

"Night, sable goddess, from her ebon throne. 
Had stretched forth in rayless majesty 
Her ebon scepter o'er a slumbering world' ; 

the echoes were kept constantly awake by the unearthly yells of 
drunken, half-wild men, and the streets witnessed several "rough and 
tumble" fights. Later in the afternoon, just before the departing sun 
had hidden, his face behind the Western horizon, two men, in the full- 
ness of physical manhood, received their death blows. Wm. James 
and John Patterson were the candidates of their respective parties for 



HISTORICAL SKETCHES. 97 

the office of Sheriff, and they were zealously supported by their con- 
stituents. Daniel Lane, from Illinois, was living with Win. James, 
and, naturally enough, favored that gentlemen's election. John Coon, 
a butcher by occupation, and a peaceable, inoffensive man, when not 
under the influence of liquor, was an advocate of Patterson's election. 
These two men became engaged in a discussion of the merits of their 
respective candidates, which finally terminated by Coon saying that 
he would "bet Lane a half-dollar that he (Lane) dare not strike him." 
The words had hardly passed the lips of Coon when Lane struck at his 
adversary, who stabbed his antagonist in the breast under the right 
nipple. Lane reeled and fell to the pavement, the blood flowing freely 
from the ghastly wound. John Duckworth, seeing that the infuriated 
man was endeavoring to "cut his way" from the crowd, struck him 
several times with his fist, but without effect. Coon continued striking 
out with his knife until Green Duckworth hit the crazed man on the 
head with a heavy board, felling him to his knees, when John Pierson 
picked up a stick of cord wood and with that instrument succeeded in 
mashing the unfortunate man's skull, and then departed for parts un- 
known. Lane lingered in great agony until midnight, when he died. 
Coon was taken to jail, where he expired a few minutes after his victim. 
They were buried in the same grave on the following day. Green 
Duckworth, a few years afterward, committed suicide in Louisiana 
and John Duckworth met with a frightful death by being thrown from 
a buggy one mile north of Mt. Vernon. The above affair occurred 
near the corner of Main and Second streets. 

James McFaddin stabbed and murdered Wm. Stephens on a flat 
boat, on the Ohio river, 4 miles below Mt. Vernon ; was tried, con- 
victed and sentenced by Elisha Embree, presiding judge, to the peni- 
tentiary for a term of 20 years. The case was appealed to the Supreme 
Court of the State, but the decision of the court below was sustained. 
He was sent to prison March 14, 1846. 

Noah Nesler, during the construction of the New Harmony and 
Mt. Vernon plank road, was stabbed and murdered, June 4, 1850, by 
Jonathan Combs, who escaped and has never been brought to trial. 

Wm. Chancellor, on the 30th of March, 1852, in Harmony Town- 
ship, was shot and killed by Wm. Gibbs, who was apprehended on 
the day following, but was discharged for want of sufficient testimony 
to establish his guilt. It was afterwards developed that Gibbs was the 
guilty party, but he had, in the meantime, effected his escape, and he 
was never brought to trial The murder was the result of a family 
difficulty, and it was committed while Chancellor was playing a violin, 
he having been fired at through the window of his house. 

Charles Stewart was murdered, in Point Township, by David Hines 
and Andrew Mackev, June 7, 1858. by being clubbed with a rifle. 



OS HISTORICAL SKETCHES. 

The parties effected their escape, and the case was stricken from the 
docket at the September term of the Circuit Court, 1867. 

Elisha Lewis, for shooting and killing J eddy Pitts on the 18th of 
August, i860, was indicted by the grand jury for murder in the second 
degree September 27, i860. Lewis made his escape and was not 
captured until he had swum the Wabash and Ohio rivers several times ; 
was arraigned before Judge Wm. F. Parrett at the September term of 
the Circuit Court, i860, tried, convicted and sentenced to the peniten- 
tentiary for life. 

Mary Shepard, December 3, 1861, murdered her infant by strangu- 
lation ; was tried, convicted and sentenced to the penitentiary for 
thirteen years, by Judge Parrett, at the March term of the Circuit 
Court, 1862. 

On July 16, 1864, Asbury Ferguson, at New Harmony, accidentally 
killed Leroy Vandiver by hitting him with a brick ; indicted by the 
grand jury at the September term of the Circuit Court, 1864; case 
nollied March 27, 1866. 

Baldwin Erwin, August 6, 1864, at Farmersville, shot and killed 
Manalcus P. Powell, for seduction of his wife ; indicted by the grand 
jury for murder in the first degree ; nolle prosequi entered at the March 
term of the Circuit Court, 1875. 

Fieldon N. Chamberlain, a Federal soldier, at Mt. Vernon, on the 
8th of August, 1864, shot and killed Wm. Balou and Joseph Gamble; 
was tried, on a change of venue, in the Vanderburgh Circuit Court, 
and was there acquitted on a plea of self-defense. 

John Garris, on December 6, 1864, murdered Michael Herman, an 
old stage driver, in Center township, with a club ; indicted by the 
grand jury, at the March term of the Circuit Court, for murder in the 
first degree; was tried, convicted and sentenced, by Judge W. F. Par- 
rett, to be hanged on the first Friday in November, 1865; sentence 
commuted by Governor Conrad Baker to imprisonment for life. Garris 
was a soldier in a regiment organized by the Governor during the Lite 
civil war. 

Leonidas Sweeten, on September 7, 1865, cut and killed John 
Hendrix, at West Franklin ; was indicted by the grand jury, at the 
September term of the Circuit Court which convened the same year ; 
was tried and convicted before Judge W. F. Parrett, by whom he 
was sentenced to the penitentiary for a period of five years, from 
September 27. 1S67. He was reprieved by Governor Baker soon af- 
terwards. 

George Bacon, at Mt. Vernon, on September 17, 1865, shot and 
killed John H. Weare, who lost his life while endeavoring to protect 
Aaron Greathouse. Bacon fled immediately after the shooting, and 
has never been apprehended. He was indicted by the grand jury for 



HISTORICAL SKETCHES. 



99 



the crime of murder, but no active measures for his arrest have ever 
been instituted. There was " a woman in the case." 

Abraham Quarrels, on August 18, t866, cut and killed Wm. Whal- 
ley with a knife; indicted for murder in the second degree by the grand 
jury at the October term of the Circuit Court, 1866; was tried, con- 
victed and sentenced, by Judge W. F. Parrett, to the penitentiary for 
a period of time covering his natural life. 

John Redman, at the March term of the Circuit Court, 1869, was 
indicted by the grand jury for the murder of Ezra Wooding, by shoot- 
ing and cutting him, on February 15, 1868 ; nollied September 20, 
1870. Redman was one of a posse of the Sheriff who went to the 
house of Wooding to arrest him for tarring and feathering a negro. 

Levi Coffin, on February 25, 1868, shot ank killed Patrick Gilles- 
pie, at West Franklin. By a verdict of the Coroner's jury, it is known 
that the event was the result of a quarrel, and as there is no further re- 
cord of the matter on the books of the Circuit Court, we presume the 
murderer was acquitted at the preliminary examination before the jus- 
tice. 

Robert F. Dunn, a riverman, November 3, 1868, at Mt. Vernon, 
shot and killed Samuel Miller, a laborer; indicted by the grand jury 
for murder in the first degree; nollied nunc pro tunc 

Reese Gentry was shot and murdered by being waylaid on the 
public highway, on the night of November 5, 1868. No action was 
ever taken that led to the identity of the murderer. It is said that a 
man who subsequently resided at Phillipstown, Illinois, while on his 
death-bed, confessed to being the murderer, giving as his reason that 
he was cognizant of the existence of a criminal intimacy between his 
wife and his victim, immediately prior to the commission of the deed. 

Richard Russel was shot and killed on the 24th of December, 
1868, by Gabriel Hathaway, three miles Northeast of Mt. Vernon, at 
a house on what is known as the "old Finnel farm," where a ball was 
in progress when the event occurred. Hathaway escaped and has 
eluded the authorities of the law to this time. 

Charles Leunig and John W. Jenkins were jointly indicted by the 
grand jury for murdering James C. Beard, at Mt. Vernon, February 
16, 1869. They were arraigned and while the trial was in progress in 
the Circuit Court, Judge James G. Jones saw fit to discharge the jury, 
his suspicions as to their fidelity "being the motive, and immediately 
thereafter ordered a new trial; whereupon a change of venue was taken 
to the Vanderburgh Circuit Court, where it was held that the life of 
the prisoners could not be placed in jeopardy twice for the same offence. 
An appeal to the Supreme Court of the State was taken by the prose- 
cution, where the decision of the court below was sustained, and they 
were discharged. 



TOO HISTORICAL SKETCHES. 

Peter Baker, a colored man, in February. 1869, shot and killed, at 
Mt. Vernon, Washington Balou, also colored ; no indictment in the 
case has ever been recorded, that can be found. Baker escaped and is 
still a fugitive from justice. 

Eugene Vandiver, at New Harmony, on September 15, 1870, shot 
Warren Pitts, who died on the 29th of the same month, same year; an 
indictment for murder was returned by the grand jury at the April term 
of the Circuit Court, 1872; case nollied March 26, 1877. 

George Ferguson, a farmer, was indicted for murder in the second 
degree for stabbing and killing Alfred Bell, a farmer, October 17, 
1870, at Mt. Vernon; was tried, convicted and sentenced at the May 
term of the Circuit Court, 187 1, by David T. Laird, Judge, to the 
penitentiary for a period of and during his natural life; served seven 
years and was reprieved on account of consumption, with which he 
was afflicted, it was said. 

Henry Roeder, on the 10th of December, 1870, clubbed William 
Downey to death at Wadesville; was indicted by the grand jury at 
the April term of the Circuit Court, 187 1; was tried, convicted and 
sentenced, by Judge David T. Laird, on May n, 1871, to the peni 
tentiary for five years. 

Scott Davis, August 21, 187 1, shot and killed George Graham, 
near Poseyville. Search of the records failed to disclose any action 
taken by the authorities in this case, though the murder was chronicled 
in the New Harmony Register at the time the crime was committed. 

Stephen Harris, February 14, 1874, in Harmony township, cut 
and killed Henry Cox; indicted by the grand jury in March, follow- 
ing; case nollied June 11, 1878. 

George Horton, a farmer, at Mt. Vernon, stabbed and killed a 
shoemaker by die name of Wm. Slack, December 21, 1874; he was 
indicted Dy the grand jury for murder in the first degree at the January 
term of the Circuit Court, 1875; case nollied at the March term of the 
same Court, 1877. Immediately after the commission of the crime Horton 
made his escape and succeeded in eluding the authorities of the law. 

George Johnson, February 18, 1877, was shot and killed by John 
or George Mott, two clerks, at New Harmony, while attempting to 
burglariously enter the store of Messrs. Ford and Owen, of that place; 
the evidence at the preliminary examination was considered sufficient 
to warrant the discharge of the Motts, who established the proof that 
the deed was committed while defending the property of their em- 
ployers. 

Charles Martel, a cooper, was stabbed in the back, at Fuhrer's 
grove, one mile West of Mt. Vernon, and killed by John W. Sullivan, 
a clerk, son of Hon. E. T. Sullivan, of Evansville, on May 21, 1877. 
At a preliminary examination held before Justice Joshua Cox, Sullivan 



HISTORICAL SKETCHES. IOI 

was placed under bond, which he forfeited, and is now a fugitive from 
justice. 

David Weaver, alias Patrick Mullen, was murdered near the L. & 
X. Railway bridge, on the Wabash river, October 28, 1877; Wm. 
Chambers, Hamilton Brown and Alfred Buckner, colored men, were 
indicted by the grand jury at the October term of the Circuit Court, 
same year, but a trial of the parties was never inaugurated because of 
a want of sufficient evidence. 

Frederick Vierling, a dyer by occupation, was shot and killed, in 
the Spring of 1878, at Mt. Vernon, by some unknown persons. No 
action has ever been taken that established the guilt of the suspected 
murderers. 

Dennis Leslie, a boy, shot and killed Commodore Curtis, his step- 
father, for abusing his mother and threatening his life, in the Summer 
of 1878, of which he was acquitted at the preliminary examination be- 
fore a justice in Point township. 

Annie McCool, a white prostitute, was murdered at Mt. Vernon, 
by some unknown person, in September, 1878. Her murderer was 
supposed to have been a negro paramour. 

Daniel Harris, a negro, on October 11, 1878, shot and killed Cyrus 
Oscar Thomas, a son of Geo. W. Thomas, Esq., of Mt. Vernon, while 
the latter was in the discharge of his duty as I )eputy Sheriff. Harris was 
indicted by the grand jury at the October term of the Circuit Court in 
1878, and at the August term of that court in 1881, the prosecutor, 
Wm. H. Cudgel, entered a nolle prosequi. It is supposed by some 
and denied by others that Harris was murdered by the friends of his 
victim who disposed of his body by means which will forever leave its 
whereabouts a mystery. 

James Good, Jeff Hopkins, Wm. Chambers and Edward Warner, 
all colored, were hanged October 12, 1878. by a body of unknown 
men, from trees in the Public Square, at Mt. Vernon, for murders and 
other heinous acts committed by them during that year. 

J. Willard Reed stabbed and killed James Baker, at Mt. Vernon, 
in the Winter of 1880; indicted for manslaughter; placed under bail 
of $1,000; forfeited; trial pending. 

James Pigg (colored), laborer, was shot and killed in Black Town- 
ship, February .5, 1880. Prince Jones (colored), laborer, was indicted 
for the crime, and was charged by the Grand Jury with murder in the 
first degree. Jones was tried, on a change of venue, in the Vander- 
burgh Circuit Court, at the January term, 1882, and sentenced to the 
penitentiary for 99 years. He had been tried in the Posey Circuit 
Court a year previous and was sentenced at that court for the same 
period of time. Immediately after his incarceration in the peniten- 
tiary, the case was appealed to the Supreme Court for a new hearing, 



102 HISTORICAL SKETCHES. 

which was granted. The cost to Posey County for the trial of Jones 
was about $3,000. 

Wm. Poenix, in a fit of jealousy, shot and murdered Miss Izitha 
Bundy, a daughter of Kirk Bundy, Esq., a farmer living in Lynn 
township, on the 20th of June, 1880, and at the same time destroyed 
himself by shooting in the head. Poenix was a laborer whom Mr. 
Bundy had employed, and it was while he was engaged at the farm 
that he became very much enamored with the young lady, to whom 
he had made proposals of marriage, and which were rejected. Know- 
ing that he could never gain her consent to marriage, he resolved upon 
committing the awful crimes of murder and suicide. A favorable 
opportunity was offered him on the afternoon of that beautiful June day, 
when the young lady went to visit a neighbor's in the immediate vicinity 
of her home, and he took advantage of it. He took a rifle, belonging 
to his employer, telling the mother of the girl, on leaving the house, 
that he was going to shoot a quail which he heard near by. He went 
in the direction the young lady had taken, and seated himself behind 
a stump, standing near the roadside, to await the return of his 
victim. A short time elapsed before he saw the object of his terrible 
design, light-hearted and in the bloom ot youth, coming towards him. 
When she was within twenty paces of him, the miscreant deliberately 
shot her dead, and then, after reloading the gun, walked to where the 
girl lay cold in death, placed the muzzle of the weapon to his head and 
discharged it with the ramrod, and thus he was made the instrument 
of two tragic deaths, to be added to the long list of murders commit- 
ted in the County. 

Wm. Bare, a saloon keeper, on the steamer Samuel Born, while on 
a Sunday excursion, near West Franklin, on May 22, 1881, shot and 
killed John Hendrix ; indicted for murder in the first degree; was tried, 
convicted and sentenced to the penitentiary for a term of three years, 
at the November term of the Circuit Court, 1881. 

Robert K. Vint, a blacksmith, in an affray at Cynthiana, on the 
20th of August, 1881, shot and killed Joseph Alvey, a wagon maker; 
was indicted by the grand jury at the term of the Circuit Court which 
was in session at the time, but he has not been brought to trial at this 
time (1882). 

VARIOUS INCIDENTS. 

In early times muster duty was imposed upon every able bodied 
man, a failure of its performance was punished by a fine. In 1820 the 
members of the Society of Rappites refused to obey the law, and the 
Sheriff, for that reason, was ordered by the Commissioners to collect 
forty cents from every member not exempt, of whom there were 85. 



HISTORICAL SKETCHES. IO3 

Their reason for not taking part in the musters was their opposition to 
bearing arms. Regimental musters were held annually at the home of 
Lewis Wilson, while battalion musters were held in various parts of 
the County. 

The early pioneers regarded physical force as an indication of the 
highest type of manhood, a virtue that few men possessed without 
finding it necessary very frequently to sustain their reputation for prowess 
in tests of strength. At log rollings, elections, courts, musters or 
wherever an event that attracted crowds occurred, athletic exercises 
were indulged in, and it was an invariable rule to enliven the occasion 
by numerous personal encounters. He who could jump farther, run 
swifter or throw his man in a wrestling bout was a hero, and he was 
looked upon with envious eyes. An election or a muster day never 
came off that did not witness more fighting than would occur in a year 
at this time; a fact that offers a contrast in the condition of morals of 
the two periods that is eulogistic of the progress and laws of to-day. It 
certainly is evident that the advantages of civilization have a refining 
tendency. There was at that age, as there are at this and will probably 
be at all eras in the future, conspicuous and peculiar characters. One 
of the "characters" of that day was a man by the name of Tom Miller, 
who was considered as being, and which he believed himself, very 
much of a man physically. Tom, in his sober moments, was inclined 
to be peaceable and would never engage in a brawl, if it were possible 
to avoid it without incurring the charge of cowardice. But when he 
quaffed bumpers of "the ardent," his latent strength appeared in giant 
form and he was never contented unless he could meet some one 
"worthy of his steel" upon "the green." Whenever Tom was seen pacing 
up and down some street, his coat off, sleeves rolled up, his shaggy 
breast exposed and his suspenders about his waist, the conclusion was 
soon reached that a storm was brewing and it must terminate with a 
squall. During this spectacle Tom's strong voice would be heard using 
the stereotyped but exasperating phrase: "I'm a mean man, a bad 
man and I orter to be whipped, I know, but whar's the man can do 
it?" This invitation was frequently accepted and led to bloody com- 
bats, but Tom, in almost every instance, vanquished his foe. This 
bold and daring yet good-natured man many years ago joined the in- 
numberable army of the dead, though there are several of his relatives 
living at this time, among whom, by marriage, is a brilliant lawyer of 
Mt. Vernon. 

It was understood among the early pioneers, that each one would 
assist the other in his work, if the exigency of his services became 
apparent. Corn huskings, quilt making, house raisings, log rollings, 
rounding up stock, and at all such tasks as required considerable labor, 
the neighbors, first being apprised, would assemble and assist the host, 



104 HISTORICAL SKETCHES. 

who invariably gave a ball and had gingerbread and cider. The mer- 
ry laughter of the rosy-cheeked, strong-lunged lasses, and the heavy 
steps of the brawny young beaus, as they kept time to the music of 
the cracked violin, evinced the fact that the event was a source of joy 
unalloyed to them. Although they had worked industriously all 
through the day, they would dance from dark until they were warned 
by the dawn of the following day, to leave. Very few of them proba- 
bly resided any nearer than ten miles from the scene of their mirth, 
yet they would mount and cheerily give spur to their animals and ride 
away, with their sweethearts behind them. A collection for the vio- 
linist was always made, and none of the assemblage was respected or 
loved more than he. Candy pullings, apple parings and spelling bees 
were prominent features in social government in those "good old 
days." How very different are the social scenes of this period from 
those of that time ! Then buxom beauties, clad in linsey or home- 
spun, fresh as a " lily kissed by the morning dew," in perfect health, 
would appear at the ball room and dance the quadrille, with a double 
shuffle, or the pigeon wing, with its more graceful movement, beside 
her stalwart male partner, until the morning sun showed his broad and 
luminous face above the Eastern horizon. Fatigue was unknown to 
them, to which their ignorance of new fangled ideas of fashion is at- 
tributable. Then they wore gloves of their own making, and the more 
aristocratic among the fair sex appeared in buckskin moccasins. Sin- 
gular as it may seem, the maidens of those days, notwithstanding all 
the obstacles they contended with, enjoyed better health than the 
average lassie of this time. Artificial means, alas, that are used nowa- 
days, to improve upon the handiwork of nature, have rendered Hy- 
giene powerless to perfect her work of physical structure. 

It will be seen by the following incident that outlawry, although 
crime was quite common in the early periods, was not tolerated when 
justice could be vindicated. In the year 1820, Humphrey Barnett, 
an old bachelor from Kentucky, where he served a term in the peni- 
tentiary, (which did not seem to have the effect of improving his moral 
condition, as he was known to be a very bad man after he came to 
this county,) stole a horse from one of the McFaddins. He was pur- 
sued very closely, and when on the eve of capture ran the horse into 
the river, at Mt. Vernon, cut its throat and pushed it into the current, 
with which it floated down the stream. He was taken by a posse of 
citizens, among whom were Jefferson Dunn and one of his brothers, 
and John McFaddin. Barnett was tied with a rope and plunged into 
the river until he was nearly drowned, but the confession that was ex- 
pected of him from this treatment would not be made. When he had 
sufficiently recovered from the ducking, anothor means was instituted 
to draw from him the verification of the suspicion as to his being the 



HISTORICAL SKETCHES. 105 

one who had stolen the horse. He was taken to a place just below the 
farm kown as the " Oatman place" and whipped with black-haw twigs 
until he made a full confession of the theft and the disposition he made 
of the horse. After this he complacently turned to his arbiters, and 
said : " Boys, cold water will never bring it, but black-haw limbs are 
an infallible truth extractor." Shortly after this occurrence, Barret left 
this region and never returned. 

In very early times, about the year 1820, John Weir, North 
McFaddin and James Culbertson, three young and vigorous men, went 
in search of wild fowls that used to sport in the waters of the pond 
which occupied the territory now bounded by Fourth, Fifth, Main and 
Store streets in Mt. Vernon. By some reason the two first named be- 
came separated from their companion, who lingered behind, it was 
thought, for the purpose of taking his "stand" at the South end of the 
pond. Only a short time intervened, however, before his companions 
heard him give utterance to screams which plainly indicated pain and 
danger. Rushing to the spot whence the sounds came they discovered 
their companion lying on the ground, bleeding from terrible gashes in 
his face, throat and body and stiff in death, while the retreating steps 
of a panther in the thicket were audible. It was at once understood 
that the unfortunate young man had met his death while under the 
large locust tree which a few years ago stood on the corner of Fourth 
and Main streets. The marks of the animal's claws could be seen in 
the bark of the tree, and it was evident to the young men that it sprang 
upon its victim from the branches. 

The first steamboat that ever passed down the Ohio river was con- 
structed at Pittsburgh, in the year t8ii. It left that city in October 
of the same year on its trial voyage, taking no freight or passengers, 
a Mr. Roosefelt, under whose direction the steamer was built, his wife 
and family, Mr. Baker, the engineer, Andrew Jack, the pilot, six hands 
and a few domestics forming the whole of her burden. The absence 
of wood yards along the banks of the rivers in those days made de- 
lays unavoidable, as the steamer was compelled to "lay to" until a 
supply of fuel could be obtained from the dense forests that skirted 
the streams. The steamer came down to Louisville, and owing to the 
small depth of water on the falls, the persons in charge found that 
they could pursue their course no farther. Having that spirit of enter- 
prise which characterizes the Yankee, Mr. Roosefelt determined upon 
plying between Cincinnati and Louisville until a sufficient depth of 
water would permit him to pass over the rapids. " The novel appear- 
ance of the steamer and the fearful rapidity with which it made its 
passage over the broad reaches of the river excited a mixture of terror 
and surprise among many of the settlers along the banks, whom the 
rumor of the invention had never reached." The unusual noise and 



106 HISTORICAL SKETCHES. 

sight of the vessel at Louisville, as she steamed to the dock at that 
place, produced considerable alarm, and many arose from their beds to 
ascertain the cause. After three weeks of confinement to the river 
above the falls, the steamer was favored by a rise in the Ohio, and she 
passed safely over. When the steamer (called the New Orleans) came 
into full view at the head of the bend six miles above McFaddins Bluff, 
the residents of that place were so frightened that they fled to the 
woods, supposing that the devil was out on a lark and would do them 
some injury should he come in reach of them. It was at night, and as 
they had retired, a great many were found shivering in their night 
clothes at a very late hour and sometime after the vessel had passed. 
Some of the more adventurous, however, when their fright had worn 
off, viewed the craft from the hill with considerable astonishment. 
The boat was one of 410 tons burden and travelled at the rate of five miles 
per hour. The boat encountered trouble at New Madrid during the 
severe shocks of earthquakes of that period, but finally reached New 
Orleans without sustaining any very great damage. 

Wm. Hunter, in 18 10, at the present site of the town of New Harmo- 
ny, built and launched the first flatboat that ever carried produce to a 
Southern market. It was built for John Gresham, but who, on account 
of his great fear of the earthquakes referred to above, sold it to Wm. 
McAdoo, his father-in-law, who went South with pork and corn in 
the winter of the year 181 1. 

KIDNAPING WAR. 

Among the early settlers along the borders of the Ohio river was 
found a class of men who were regarded by the honest backwoods- 
men of the time as thieves, counterfeiters and murderers. This very 
rough and desperate element was chiefly made up of fugitives from 
justice from the more thickly populated and civilized districts of 
the East and South, while some of them, by their adventurous natures, 
had been induced to locate on the frontier by the motive which was 
born of the belief that it offered a secure field in which to carry on 
their nefarious operations. The relations which these outlaws and 
desperadoes bore to each other created the supposition that they were 
bound together by a devout compact, sealed by an exacting oath and 
strengthened and systematized by secret signs. This opinion was 
strongly confirmed by the fact that these characters associated with no 
one but representatives of their class, and as they were constantly going 
and coming, it is safe to state that the organization composed all of 
that disreputable clan who committed heinous crimes all along the 
Mississippi, Ohio and Wabash rivers. There are, at this date, many 
highly esteemed and honorable families living in this community who 



HISTORICAL SKETCHES. I07 

are descendants of some of that gang, and it would be improper, for that 
reason, to mention the names of the individuals dishonorably associated 
with this narrative. This fact is established by strong circumstantial 
evidence which leaves no room for doubt that, at an early period, 
their remote ancestors were members of that part of the organization 
which existed in this County, and who resided above West Franklin 
and along the Ohio river from that point to and below Mt. Vernon. 
It is a matter of history that members of this same band were numerous 
at Shawneetown, Ills., Ford's Ferry, Ky., Cave-in-Rock, Ills., and at 
points on the Ohio river as far as Cairo, Ills. It is also well known 
that the rendevous of these lawless men was at Metropolis, Ills., where, 
in later years, they were divided and their respective factions were 
called the "Regulators" and w 'Flatheads," between whom a bitter feel- 
ing of jealousy and hate was, more lately, engendered. The most 
prominent of this gang of adventurous, desperate men was Acquilla 
Ford, who sojourned in this County, at different periods, sixty years ago. 
In the Northeastern part of the County, at that time, resided a man by 
the name of Goddard, whose wife, a white woman, who by an unnatural 
and disgraceful yet sad misstep, was the mother of a pair of twin boys, 
then six years of age, one a bright mulatto and the other of very dark com- 
plexion. Goddard was a very dissipated and intemperate man, who on a 
day in 1822 was absent from home, when Acguilla Ford rode up to his 
house in a hurry and, with an assumed look of excitement, informed Mrs. 
Goddard that her husband had sustained fatal injuries by being thrown 
from his horse six or eight miles distant, and who desired to see her 
before he died. There being no one at the house in whose custody 
she could leave the children, she asked Ford what she should do 
with them, when he told her to place one of them in front of and the 
other behind him on his horse, and he would take them to a neighbor's, 
where she could get them when her errand had been attended to. 
This arrangement was readily entered into by the unfortunate woman, 
and she immediately set out for the scene of the supposed accident, 
following the road that Ford had taken, hoping to overtake him. She 
hurried onward as rapidly as she could until she reached the house of 
the neighbor where Ford was to leave the children, where she learned 
that the miscreant had not been; and it was then that she entertained 
the terrible opinion that her boys had been kidnaped. Wild with 
misgivings, and already greatly fatigued from walking, she hurried 
forward with as much speed as possible, and had gone but a few miles 
when she met her husband, well and uninjured, returning home. 
What should she do? Her husband was a weak and dissolute charac- 
ter, while Ford was known to be a resolute desperado, whose friends 
were numerous and equally desperate, and who would defend him at 
the peril of their lives in all his villianies. The couple went to their 



Io8 HISTORICAL SKETCHES. 

home, he to wear off the effects of a debauche, and she to mourn over 
the loss of her ill-conceived progeny. The news of the high-handed 
outrage spread like wild fire, first in the immediate neighborhood, and 
then throughout the entire Northern portion of the County. 

A band of twenty-seven men was immediately organized, some of 
them armed with guns, some with clubs, who were led by Patrick Cal- 
vert, William Rogers and Joe Cater, down through the County, intent 
upon securing the stolen children. Ford and his friends about West 
Franklin were soon apprised of the move and made preparations to 
meet it ; first by dissimulation and dissuasion, and, this failing, to op- 
pose by force the rescuers The party of deliverance advanced and 
occupied a house near West Franklin, where Ford and a man named 
Inman (who lived in that place at the time) met the company. With 
honeyed words and fair excuses they represented that the children were 
gone beyond their power of recovery, and that it would be useless for 
the band to attempt a rescue. But Cater, Calvert and Rogers were 
not to be dissuaded from their object, and they boldly asserted that they 
believed the boys were secreted in the neighborhood, and insisted on a 
thorough search of the premises being permitted. This proposition 
highly incensed Ford, Inman and their sympathizers, as well as many 
of the more reputable residents in and about the village, and after a 
somewhat lengthy and heated discussion over the matter, a conflict en- 
sued between the parties. Jack Lynn and several other sympathizers 
joined the Ford- Inman gang, increasing their number to seven well 
armed, fearless men. The company of rescuers seeing this sudden 
change in affairs, and fearing that the entire neighborhood might rein- 
force them, gave way to their apprehensions and retreated, — Goddard 
being the first to do so — leaving Rogers, Calvert and Cater to resist 
the attack. This desertion was not only cowardly but untimely, and 
it was afterwards condemned in the strongest terms. Under the ex- 
citement of the moment one of the kidnapers got possession of Cater's 
gun and carried it off, leaving that gentleman nothing save a club as 
a weapon 'of defense. Some of the men who ran away got as far as 
an old cornfield, at a safe distance, where they mounted stumps, from 
which they witnessed the sanguinary and unequal contest between their 
three comrades and the seven ruffians. Guns and clubs were freely 
used by both parties, and two of the Ford-Inman gang received serious 
wounds, while Calvert only of the rescuers had been hurt. He had 
been very severely beaten and was supposed to be dead, but the affray 
continued furiously between the five of the kidnaping crew and the two 
rescuers, when Dann Lynn appeared upon the scene as a peacemaker. 
Dann Lynn — he always wrote it so — was one of the very earliest set- 
tlers of the County, had been a member of the Constitutional Conven- 
tion that framed our first Constitution, had been honored by having a 



HISTORICAL SKETCHES. IO9 

township named after him and was for two terms a member of the State 
Legislature. He was not above suspicion, even in his palmiest days as 
a politician and speculator, but he was a man of great prominence and 
influence, and by reason of his popularity with all parties concerned 
he was enabled to stop the fray and prevent further bloodshed. 

After hostilities had ceased, the company, now with only Rogers 
and Cater as their leaders, collected together and departed for their 
homes. Dann Lynn had Calvert removed to his house, administered 
to his wants and in a few days afterward restored him to his friends 
and family. But the affair did not end here. Joe Cater soon orga- 
nized another company, this time of forty well-armed, picked men, 
whose reputation for fearlessness was well known. With this picked 
band Cater revisited West Franklin, and upon this occasion he not 
only thoroughly searched that neighborhood, without opposition, but 
he actually crossed over into Kentucky and searched over a vast area 
of territory, but his efforts to find the boys were in vain- — they had 
been taken far beyond recapture. And so the second company re- 
traced their steps homeward, without even the excitement of an 
encounter with the enemy. For a time the matter was forgotten. In 
or about the year 1824, glowing accounts from parties who had gone 
to the Red river country, in Arkansas, came back, and the descriptions 
of the fertile soil had the effect of inducing a company of twelve or 
fifteen residents of Posey County to emigrate to that section, with the 
view of locating and entering lands. Patrick Calvert, who was a man 
of considerable means accompanied them, expecting, however, to 
return when he had seen that distant land The party, after looking 
at the country, concluded to return with Calvert, who had been there 
a fortnight. On their journey homeward they put up for the night 
at an inn in a small village in Arkansas, called Fulton. After supper, 
in conversation with the host, Calvert chanced to speak of his home 
in Indiana and spoke, among other things, of his experiences while 
engaged in the kidnaping war of Posey County. When he had 
finished, the landlord sat meditating for a short time and then said : 
"Stranger, about the time you mention two mulatto boys, answering 

your description exactly, were brought here and sold to , in the 

neighborhood." 

The next morning Calvert went to see the boys, and was so entire- 
tirely certain ot their identity that he at once set about to recover 
their persons in a regular and legal manner. This he did by testing 
their memories in reference to their abduction and other matters, and 
by these tests the authorities, before whom the case was taken, were 
so thoroughly convinced that these were the children abducted by 
Ford that they delivered them into the custody of Calvert, and he 
brought them back with him to their former home in this County. 



IIO HISTORICAL SKETCHES. 

Although the most degrading works of illegitimacy covered her 
offspring, like dark clouds of night obscuring the face of the moon 
behind them, it seems that Mrs. Goddard's motherly heart rejoiced as 
much over the return of her unbleached boys, in rags from a Southern 
plantation, as many a more fortunate mother would over the return of her 
boys, in broadcloth and fine linen, from a Northern College. 

In gratitude the boys were bound to Calvert, by the mother, who 
said they should serve the man who had been wounded in their de- 
fence, and who, by the hand of Providence, (probably somewhat as- 
sociated with a desire to see the Red River country !) had miraculous- 
ly delivered them from a life bondage of serfdom. The boys served 
Mr. Calvert faithfully until long after they attained their majority, and 
what became of them, or their mother, or their alcoholic, carousing 
step-father, after that, no one living seems to know. Old Dann 
Lynn and all the other Lynns of that family are dead. There is 
nothing certain kuown what became of Inman. Acquilla Ford proba- 
bly emigrated to the more congenial clime of Arkansas or Texas, and 
whiled away many of his leisure hours in concocting various plans of 
villainy before he passed away naturally or by the course of summary 
vengeance. Cater and Rogers died in this County, and there is prob- 
ably not one of the sixty or seventy persons living who actively par- 
ticipated in The Kidnaping War. 

While the "Flower House" (now occupied by Theodore Hudnut 
as a hominy mill) was in process of constsuction, in 1835, David Mills, 
in a fit of daring, rode his horse up an incline plane which led to the 
scaffold usedjjy the mechanics. The scaffold was above the floor of the 
second story, and when the horse and rider reached it the discovery 
was made that there was not sufficient room in which to turn, though 
an' attempt was made, which resulted in their precipitancy to the 
ground. Strange to relate, nothing more serious than the breaking of 
the horse's tail was sustained, although the distance was nearly fifteen 
feet. David Mills was the father of Mrs. Joseph Welborn, Felix and 
F. N. Mills, and a man of prominence in his time. 

On the 8th of January, 1862, in Mt. Vernon, while celebrating 
the event of General Jackson's victory over the British in the battle 
of New Orleans and which terminated the "war of 181 2," Mr. Charles 
Hovey, a brother of General Hovey's, was killed by the accidental 
discharge of a six-pound gun. The accident was attributed to the 
failure of the "thumber" to keep his thumb upon the touch-hole while 
Mr. Hovey was engaged in ramming the charge into the piece, but the 
act was excused when it was known that his thumb was severly burned. 
The ramrod in its passage from the gun entered the side of the un- 
fortunate man and wounded him most frightfully, from the effects of 
which he died on the following day. 



HISTORICAL SKETCHES. Ill 

On the 26th of January, 1881, Dr. E. V. Spencer, while going to 
his residence, at the corner of Mulberry and Fourth streets, in Mt. 
Vernon, was ruthlessly set upon by midnight assassins and robbed. 
He was struck from the rear upon the head and felled to the ground 
and left in an unconscious condition. Dr. Spencer recovered, and in 
November following prosecuted Francis Moore for the crime. The 
jury returned a verdict of guilty and assessed the punishment at four- 
teen years in the penitentiary. Benjamin Kemper, John Reed and 
William Morgan are held as accessories at this time. The trial is set 
for the April term of the Circuit Court, 1882. 

On Wednesday, the 25, of January, 1882, while Mrs. Alvis Gregory 
was sitting at a sewing machine, in the house of her brother, who 
resides two miles East of Springfield, some one fired upon her through 
a window from the outside, the contents of the weapon entering her 
neck and seriously wounding her. The wound was probed by a phy- 
sician, who discovered that a ball had penetrated the spinal column at 
the base of the brain, which must necessarily jeopardize her life. The 
husband of the woman was suspected of the crime, and he was arrested 
and taken before a justice, who fixed his bond at $1,500 to await 
the action of the grand jury. A few days after the attempted assassi- 
nation, the grand jury indicted Gregory, who, upon hearing the result 
of their deliberations, fled the country. The Sheriff, Alex. Crunk, 
immediately offered a reward of $400 for the arrest of the fugitive, but 
at this writing (February 24,) his whereabouts has not been ascertained. 

PRIMITIVE MILLS. 

It is claimed by some that George Rappe and his associates con- 
structed the first grist mill in the County, but this is denied, and it has 
been stated upon good authority that John Warrick, about the year 
181 2, built a mill on the "|cut-off " at New Harmony, and it had been 
in operation some time, manufacturing meal, when the Rappites bought 
and remodeled it. It was at this mill where the first "home-made" 
flour was manufactured, the honor falling to the peculiar society which 
located at Harmonie in 1814 and 181 5. The mill was run by water- 
power. 

Darius North, Virgil Soaper and Andrew McFaddin constructed the 
first steam saw mill, at Mt. Vernon, in 183 1, who afterwards added 
machinery for grinding corn, and it finally became a grist mill and dis- 
tillery. The building was destroyed by fire in 1838; was rebuilt by 
George Moore, Jesse Moore and Fonda, the same year, and de- 
stroyed again by fire about 1853; was rebuilt again by DeWit C. 
James and George Mugge about 1855. This mill and distillery was 
four stories high and had a capacity equal to 225 barrels of flour and 



j i 2 HISTORICAL SKETCHES. 

1,30° gallons of whisky per day. It passed into the hands of Her- 
man Munchhoff and George Wolflin in the year 1865, which, on Feb- 
ruary, 1873, was destroyed the third and last time by fire. The huge 
smoke stack which belched forth clouds of smoke of inky blackness, 
day and night, for many years, is still standing— a monument of indus- 
try and a silent spectator of the eventful spot. 

Before these mills were constructed the primitive inhabitants, when 
they did not "grind", their meal by the use of strong cloth and heavy 
stones, went to the Saline, in Illinois, for their "grinding." The salt 
they obtained in that section was the principal inducement for making 
the journey, though in those remote periods a ride on horseback of 
twenty-five or thirty miles "to mill" was regarded as a minor under- 
taking. In the year 1817, James Black erected a grist and saw mill 
on Big Creek, near the Upper New Harmony and Mt. Vernon stage 
road. Its motive power was water. Wm. Wear, father of James and 
John, in 1820, built a grist mill on the farm now owned by the widow 
of James, eight miles Northwest of Mt. Vernon. Abner Coates, m 
1825, constructed and operated a mill on Coates' Creek, in Lynn 
Township. G. W. Thomas, in 1836, erected a grist and saw mill, on 
Big Creek, near the present village of Grafton. It was burned and 
rebuilt in 1841 and which, in 1848, was destroyed again by fire. It 
was rebuilt again in that year. Innumerable horse mills have been 
constructed in the county and for years were the main source of de- 
pendence for "bread stuff'to the neighborhoods in which they were lo- 
cated. They have long since been " things of the past." 

In 1832 John Wear erected a water mill near the mter-section of 
Third street and Mill Creek, at Mt. Vernon, which he, a few years 
afterwards, removed to the present site of the city wharf in that 
town, when it was run by steam power. The first tannery in Posey 
County was erected by Adam Albright in 1 810. on the farm known as 
the "Old Jourdan Place," five miles Northwest of Mt. Vernon. He 
was the father of Adam, William and John, who was the father of 
Columbus, a teacher in the County schools 

We give below a complete list of the officers of the County in 
every department, the Judges of the Supreme Court and the Gov- 
ernors of the State, which ends the historical part of this volume. 

DELEGATES, SENATORS, REPRESENTATIVES AND OTHER COUNTY OFFICERS. 

We earnestly hoped that we might give . the list of the representa- 
tives of Posey County in the State Legislature in the order of their 
election, but we have been unable to do so because of the absence of 
all means by which that end could be attained. The gentleman who 
represented the County as a delegate to the Constitutional Convention 



HISTORICAL SKETCHES. 113 

which convened at Corydon, June 10, 1816, was Daniel Lynn, his 
election to that position having occurred on May 13th of that year. When 
the Convention had completed its labors, and adopted a Constitution 
for the State Government, he returned home, and when the first State 
and County election occurred, he was elected the first Representative, 
Daniel Grass, of Warrick, representing Posey in the Senate. 

"James Lockhart was Senatorial, and Robert Dale Owen and Al- 
vin P. Hovey were Representative delegates to the Convention in 
1850, that framed our present Constitution." 



Thomas Givens, William Casey, Charles I. Battel!, Joseph Lane, 
John Pitcher, William H. Stockwell, Enoch R. James, William Great- 
house, Cyrus K. Drew, Magnus T. Carnahan, Thomas C. Jaquess, 
Thomas J. Hargrave, Jasper Davidson, G. V. Menzies, incumbent. 

REPRESENTATIVES. 

Dann Lynn, William Casey, Jessie R. Craig, Jessie Y. Welborn, 
Richard Daniel, George S. Green, Robert D. Owen, Charles I. 
Battell, Azra Lee, Samuel Annable, W. B. Southard, Ebon D. Edson, 
James C. Endicott, John Hall, Magnus T. Carnahan, George W. 
Thomas, Adam Lichtenberger, Felix Mills, Horatio C. Cooper, Silas 
Cox, Hamilton S. Casselberry, Joel Hume, Urbin Harris, William P. 
Edson, William Carroll Pitts, Hazel Nelson, Joseph P. Edson, Edward 
T. Sullivan, Elijah M. Spencer, George Wolfln, Wolfgang Hynes, Jas. 
W. Whitworth, Jos. F. Welborn, Russel Blockley, John Walz, incumbent. 

Several of the above Legislators served a number of terms, among 
whom were Felix Mills, Robert Dale Owen and Magnus T. Carnahan. 

COUNTY CLERKS IN THE ORDER OF ELECTION. 

William E.Stewart, from January t6, 1815, to June 1817; David 
Love ; from June, 1817, to May, 1819; James P. Drake, from May, 
1819, to August, 1829; Wm. E. Stewart, from August, 1829, to May, 
1839; Turner Nelson, from May, 1839, to May, 1861; Wm. P. Ed- 
son, from May, 1861, to May, 1865 ; Turner Nelson, from May, 1865, 
to August 12, 1867; Wm. Nelson, from August, 1867, to November 
1, 1875; George W. Curtis, from November 1, 1875, incumbent. 

SHERIFFS OF THE COUNTY IN THE ORDER OF ELECTION. 

John Carson, from January 16, 1815, to 1817; Wm. Boyle, one 



114 HISTORICAL SKETCHES. 

year; James Robb, one year; Aaron Bacon, four years; John Carson, 
four years; Felix Mills, four years; Wm. James, four years; Felix 
Mills, four years; Thomas Duckworth, two years; John Cox, two 
years ; Felix Mills, four years ; Aaron C. Moore, two years ; John Pat- 
terson, two years; Joseph Showers, two years; Felix Mills, six years; 
Joseph Showers, two years ; Aaron Llchtenberger, six years ; John M. 
Duckworth, two years; Aaron Lichtenberger, two years; Alexander 
Crunk, four years; John L. Wheeler, four years; Alexander Crunk, 
incumbent. 

RECORDERS IN THE ORDER OF ELECTION. 

Thomas B. Holt, May i, 1851, to October 2, 1855; George R. 
Latham, October 3, 1855, to November 12, 1855; John D. Hinch, 
November 12, 1855, to November, 1863; George W. Thomas, Novem- 
ber, 1863, to November, 1867; Field A. Pentecost, November, 1867, 
to November 1, 1875; Philo A. Hutcheson, November, 1875, incumbent. 

AUDITORS IN THE ORDER OF ELECTION. 

Thomas F. Prosser, 1844 to 1863; John B. Gardiner, 1863 to 187 1; 
F. D. Bolton, November 18, 187 1, to November, 1875; Alfred Dale 
Owen, from November, 1875, incumbent. 

TREASURERS IN THE ORDER OF ELECTION. 

Samuel Jones, from 1817 to 1822; John Schnee, from 1822 to 1826; 
James W. Swift, from 1826 to 1829; William E. Stewart, from January, 
1819, to September, 1829; James Robb, from 1829 to 1830; Felix 
Mills, from 1830 to 1832; James Robb, from 1832 to 1833; George 
S. Green, from 1833 to 1837; Ebon D. Edson, from 1837 to 1839; 
John Pitcher, from 1839 to 1840; William J. Lowry, from 1840 to 
1844; John Cox, from 1844 to 1847; John M. Sanders, from 1847 to 
1853; Felix Mills, from 1853 to 1857; John M. Sanders, from 1857 
to 1859; John B Gardiner, from 1859 to 1861; Joseph F. Welborn, 
from 1861 to 1863; William B. Smith, from 1863 to 1867; Thomas 
Stevens, from 1867 to 1869; Joseph Showers, from 1869 to T873; 
John G. Young, from 1873 to l8 75; George Naas, from 1875 to 1879; 
Nicholas Joest, from 1879, incumbent. 

PRESENT BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS. 

William Williams, of Robb; James J. Bailey, of Lynn, and Eber- 
hard P. Schenk, of Black Townships. 



HISTORICAL SKETCHES. 
SURVEYORS OF THE COUNTY. 



Matthew Williams, Ebenezer Phillips, William F. Phillips, J. W. 
Whitworth, Aaron Baker, Moses Johnson and T. J. Johnson, incum- 
bent. 



SUPERINTENDENTS OF SCHOOLS. 



Robert McCann, from June, 1861, to June, 1865; M. W. Pearse, 
from June, 1865, to June, 1868; James B. Campbell, from June, 1868, 
to June, 1875; Harrison O'Bannon, from June, 1875, t0 November, 
1875 ; James B. Campbell, from November, 1875, to J une > 1877 ; 
James W. French, from June, 1877, to June, 1881 ; James Kilroy, 
from June, 1881, incumbent. 



Jacob Fisher, from August, 1851, to Aug. 1855; Joseph Spaulding, 
from August, 1859, to October 30, 1861 ; John Conyngton, from Oct. 
30, 1 86 1, to November 2, 1863; Adam Lichtenberger, from Nov. 2, 
1863, to November 2, 1865; Marcus S. BLunt, from November 2, 1865, 
to November 1, 1867; S. H. Pearse, from November 1, 1867, to Oct. 
25, 1870; Jesse Kuykendall, from October 25, 1870, to October 25, 
1872; Adolph Matzdorff, from November 12, 1872, to July 20, 1873; 
Cyrus O. Thomas, from August 22, 1873, t0 October 9, 187J ; Wm. 
Hendricks, from October 12, 18^3, incumbent. 

PROSECUTING ATTORNEYS (COMMON PLEAS COURT.) 

Henry Kaiger, from 1852, to 1854; Joseph P. Edson, from 1854 
to 1856; E. M. Spencer, from 1856 to 1858; Wm. P. Edson, from 
1858 to i860; E. M. Spencer, from i860 to 1862; Ellis Lewis, from 
1862 to 1864; Chas. G. Bennett, from 1864 to 1868; Wm. M. Hoggatt, 
from 1868 to 1870. After 1880 the State causes in the Common Pleas 
Court were transferred to the jurisdiction of the Circuit Court Prosecu- 
tor and the office ceased to exist. 

PROSECUTING ATTORNEYS, (CIRCUIT COURT.) 

Ebon D. Edson, James Blythe, Thomas B. Holt, Richard Clements, 
H. G. Barkwell, A. L. Robinson, Nat. Usher, James M. Shanklin, 
Blythe Hynes, Lewis C. Stinson, Wm. P Hargrave, Wm. Henning, 
John Brownlee, Wm. H. Gudgel, incumbent. 



Il6 HISTORICAL SKETCHES. 

JUDGES POSEY CIRCUIT COURT. 

Isaac Blackford, from 1815 to March 18, 1816; David Raymond, 
(appointed by Gov. Thomas Posey,) from March 18, 1816, to August 
16, 1816; Wm. Prince, from August 16, 1816, to March 17, 1817; 
.David Hart, from February 16, 4818, to March 8, 18 19; Richard 
Daniel, from March 8, 1819, to March 3, 1820; James R. E. Good- 
lett, from March 20, 1820, to February, 1832; Samuel Hall, from 
February, 1832, to September 13, 1835; Charles I. Battell, from 
September 13, 1835, to 1836; Elisha Embree, from 1836, to March, 
1846; James Lockhart, from March, 1846, to September 21, 1851; 
Alvin P. Hovey, (appointed by Gov. Joseph A. Wright,) from Septem- 
ber 21, 1 85 1, to April, 1854 — (appointed to fill a vacancy on the Su- 
preme Bench, May 8, 1854;) Wm. E. Niblack, from April, 1854, to 
March 29, 1858; Ballard Smith, (appointed to fill vacancy occasioned 
by the resignation of Wm. E. Niblack,) from March 29, 1858, to 
April, 1859; Michael F. Burke, from April, 1859, to September, 1859; 
Wm. F. Parrett, (appointed to fill vacancy caused by the death of M. 
F. Burke,) from September, 1859, to March, 1869; James G. Jones, 
from March, 1869, to November, 1870; David T. Laird, from Novem- 
ber, 1870, to March 7, 1873, (when a change in the Judicial District 
by an act of the Legislature deposed him ; ) Wm. F. Parrett, (ap- 
pointed by Gov. Thomas A. Hendricks, to fill the vacancy caused by 
an act of the Legislature deposing D. T. Laird,) from March 7, 1873, 
incumbent. 

JUDGES COMMON PLEAS COURT OF POSEY COUNTY. 

John Pitcher, from October, 1852, to November 5, 1866; Andrew 
L. Robinson, from November 5, 1866, to November 4, 1867; Morris 
S. Johnson, from November 4, 1867, to July n, 1871, Wm. P. Ed- 
son, from November 6, 1871, to July 13, 1872, J. B. Handy, from 
November 4, 1872, to March 12, 1873. 

Posey County has had the honor of sending a Representative to 
Congress, and has also been represented at a South American Court. 

In 1840 Robert Dale Owen was elected to fill the position of a 
Congressional Representative, while General Alvin P. Hovey was 
appointed Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary of the 
United States to the Government of Peru, South America, August 12, 
1865, which he resigned in 1870. 

JUDGES OF THE SUPREME COURT OF INDIANA. 

James Scott, from 181 6 to 1831 ; John Johnston, from 181 6 to 1817; 



HISTORICAL SKETCHES. 117 

Jesse L. Holman, from 1816 to 1831; Isaac Blackford, from 181 7 to 
1853; Stephen C.Stevens, from 1831 to 1836: John T. McKinney, 
from 1831 to 1837; Charles Dewey, from 1836 to 1847; Jeremiah 
Sullivan, from 1837 to 1846; Addison L. Ro.iche, from 1853 to 1854; 
Samuel E. Perkins, from 1846 to 1865; Thomas L. Smith, from 1847 
to 1853; Andrew Davison, from 1853 to 1865; William Z. Stuart, from 
1853 to 1858; Sam'l B. Gookins, from 1854 to 1857; Alvin P. Hovey 
(appointed to fill vacancy occasioned by resignation of A. L. Roache), 
from May, 1854, to November, 1854; James M. Hanna (appointed to 
fill vacancy of S. B. Gookins), from 1857 to 1865; James L. Worden, 
from 1858 to 1865; Charles A. Ray, from 1865 to 1871; John T. 
Elliott, 1865 to 1 871; James S. Frazer, 1865 to 1871; Robert C. 
Gregory, 1865 to 1871; John Petit, from 1871 to 1876; Alexander C. 
Downey, from 187 1 to 1876; James L. Worden, from 1871, incum- 
bent; Samuel H. Buskirk, from 1871 to 1877; Andrew L. Osborn, 
from 1873 to 1874; Horace P. Biddle, from 1874 to 1881; Samuel E. 
Perkins, from 1877 to 1879; William E. Niblack, from 1877, incum- 
bent; George V. Howk, from 1877, incumbent; John T. Scott (ap- 
pointed to fill vacancy occasioned by the death of Samuel E. Perkins), 
from 1879, incumbent; William A. Woods, from 1881, incumbent; 
Byron K. Elliott, from 1881, incumbent. Judges were elected by 
the people after October 12, 1852. 

GOVERNORS OF INDIANA TERRITORY. 

Arthur St. Clair, Governor Northwest Territory ; Wm. H. Harri- 
son, from 1800 to 1 81 2; Thos. Posey, from 18 12 to 18 16. 

GOVERNORS OF INDIANA. 

Jonathan Jennings, from 1816 to 1822; Wm. Hendricks, from 
1822 to 1825 ; James B. Ray, from 1825 to 1831; Noah Noble, from 
1831 to 1836; David Wallace, from 1837 to 1840; Samuel Bigger, from 
1840 to 1843 ; James Whitcomb, from 1843 to 1848; Paris C. Dun- 
ning, (acting) from T848 to 1849; Joseph A. Wright, from 1849 to 
1857; Ashbel P. Willard, from 1857 to i860; Abram A. Hammond, 
(acting,) from i860 to 1861 ; Henry S. Lane (a few days in i860;) 
Oliver P. Morton, from i860 to 1867 ; Conrad Baker, from 1867 to 
1873; Thomas A. Hendricks, from 1873 to 1877 ; James D. Williams, 
from 1877 to 1881; Albert G. Porter, from 1881, incumbent. 



Il8 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 



MRS. M. ALEXANDER 



Was born in Posey County, June 14, 1842. Her parents, George and 
Martha Greathouse, were of German descent, her father being a native 
of Kentucky, while her mother was a Virginian by birth. Her father 
died when Mrs. Alexander had but reached the tender age of seven 
months. After a few years her mother was again married, an event 
that was unfortunate for the children of the widow, as the step-father 
proved to be a man of an exacting and domineering disposition and 
bitterly opposed to the education of the children at the district school. 
Although the parents were in moderate circumstances and able to give 
the children the advantages of a common school education, they were 
denied them by the father and compelled to remain at home. For- 
tunately, the mother was a woman of culture and desired to instruct 
and prepare the children for positions in the affairs of the world by 
which they could attain distinction in social and business relations 
above the common level of mankind. It was while she was under the 
careful tutorage of her mother that Mrs. Alexander acquired a taste 
for study, and it was at that time when her ambition to excel in in- 
tellectual attainments received its first nourishment; and from that 
time onward she has assiduously cultivated her intellect, and has been 
frequently encouraged by seeing the fruits of her labors in the columns 
of papers of high reputation. Her advantages at school have been 
limited, one year at the Catholic academy of St. Vincent, near Mor- 
ganfield, Ky., comprising the whole of her school training. This was 
in i860. When she returned home she opened and taught a country 
school six months, assisting in the work of the household at the same 
time. When the Civil War began her brother, F. M. Greathouse, 
enlisted as a soldier in the First Cavalry, Indiana Volunteers, and his 
absence made it necessary for Mrs. Alexander to devote her whole 
time to the work of the farm for the support of the tamily. In 1863 
she was married to Andrew Lynne Alexander, a man of sterling worth 
and intellectual ability, by which union, in 1864, her only daughter, 
Rosemonde, was born. In 1866 her husband died, leaving her with 
the cares and responsibility of a mother and the manager of the estate. 
For six years after the demise of her husband she attended the farm 
and conducted the business with eminent success and ability, devoting 
all her leisure time to literary work, reading books of standard authors 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. II9 

and occasionally contributing to the local press. That she might give 
her daughter the advantages of the schools, she removed, in 1872, to 
Mt Vernon, where she pursued her literary work with renewed energy. 
During the period that has intervened Mrs. Alexander has published 
two books, Here and Hereafter and Going West; has contributed to 
several papers, and now has several books ready for the press, among 
which is Worth Wins, a novel possessing merit; also a number of 
poems unpublished, a drama in five acts, the scenes representing the 
life and assassination of President Lincoln, entitled From the Hovel to 
the Hall. Mrs. Alexander is special correspondent of the Indianapolis 
Times. She is a zealous advocate of temperance and Christianity, is 
opposed to woman's suffrage and is a self-made woman in all that the 
term implies. 

HENRY BRINKMAN, 

Manufacturer of Mt. Vernon, was born in the Duchy of Leppe-Det- 
mold, now a part of Prussia, June 16, 1825. Until the age of fourteen 
years he attended school, obtaininga fair education, and then worked for 
six years in a brickyard, learning the business. He then acquired the 
trade of wagon-making, at which he was employed for about five years. 
In 1850 he emigrated to America, and upon landing went directly to Ev- 
ansville, Indiana, where he remained two months, when he went Mt. 
Vernon, being obliged to walk the whole distance, as he had no money 
to pay his fare. He secured steady employment at wagon-making, 
and at the end of the year formed a partnership with his employer, 
Gotlieb Koerner, in the manufacture of wagons. This connection 
lasted two years, when the partnership was mutually dissolved, and 
for a period of seven or eight years afterwards he engaged in the manu- 
facture of agricultural implements and wagons alone. He then be- 
came associated with John H. Barter, in the same business, the firm em- 
ploying from fifteen to twenty men, the partnership continuing until 
1861. In this year he again embarked in business on his own respon- 
sibility in a small shop, when he began the manufacture of the "Brink- 
man Wagon," having but a single apprentice to assist him in the prose- 
cution of his labors. He found a ready sale for his products, and as 
they gave excellent satisfaction, his trade increased so that he was soon 
obliged to enlarge his facilities. Gradually his business improved, and 
he now employs from twelve to fifteen hands during the entire year in 
the manufacture of wagons and buggies, which have acquired a high 
reputation for their excellence and durability. He has recently begun 
the manufacture of a new style of plow, invented by himself, called 
the " Posey Clipper," and is also engaged in the manufacture of drain- 
tile, which gives employment to thirty-five men. In 1869 he estab- 



120 HISTORICAL SKETCHES. 

lished a brickyard and was largely engaged as a brick manufacturer 
until 1875. In 1877 he formed a copartnership with William Burtis, 
and opened a depot at Mt. Vernon for the sale of all kinds of agricul- 
tural implements. This copartnership existed until the Fall of 1881, 
when Mr. Burtis retired from the firm. Immediately after this occur- 
red Mr. Brinkman's sons, Henry A. and Charles F. W., were associ- 
ated with him, and the firm is now known as Henry Brinkman & 
Sons. The sales of the firm in this department alone aggregate the 
handsome sum of $40,000 per annum. They contemplate adding a 
stock of heavy hardware, a feature that must greatly augment their 
yearly sales. For five years Mr. Brinkman was President of the 
Manufacturers' Aid Society, of Mt. Vernon, of which he was also a 
director until its organization ceased. In 1869 he was elected a mem- 
ber of the City Council, holding the office two years, and was elected 
to the same office in 1878 and was re-elected in 1880 for the same 
length of time. 

He has been a Republican since the first election of Abraham Lin- 
coln. He was married in October, 1852, at Mt. Vernon, to Miss Margaret 
Hahn. They have had ten children, four sons and six daughters, all 
of whom are living. They also have five grand children. Mr. Brink- 
man is emphatically a self-made man. Having begun life with no 
capital but his hands and brains, he has built up by industry and energy 
a large and thriving manufacturing establishment, and has by his 
upright and honorable dealings won the respect and esteem of the 
community in which he resides. He is largely endowed with a spirit 
of public improvement and is untiring in his efforts to promote the 
interests of the city and County, whose welfare he has at heart. Mr. 
Brinkman was the nominee of the Republican County Convention for 
Commissioner of the First District in 1876, but was defeated at the 
regular election, because of the great difference in strength of the 
representative parties. 

EDWARD BROWN 

Was born at Litchfield, Lincoln County, Me., October 18, 1824. He 
was the second son of James and Lavina Brown, who were of English- 
French parentage, their grand parents emigrating to America as early 
as 1722 and who served in the war of the Revolution. Until he was 
20 years of age Mr. Brown worked on his father's farm, when he went 
to Boston, where he began life by peddling stamps for marking cloth- 
ing, a pursuit he soon tired of and then began work at the carpenter's 
trade, at $3.75 per month. He worked four months and then went to 
sea as a common sailor, aboard a whaling bark. During the voyage 
the vessel cruised along the coast of Africa, touched at the Azores 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 121 

Islands and went as far South as the 42d parallel of latitude. The 
master dying of consumption, he was buried at Pernambuco, Brazil, 
from whence the vessel was ordered home, having been gone nearly 
nine months. He then worked at the trade of carpenter at Roxbury, 
Mass., from April to December, 1846, when he again went to sea, 
shipping as carpenter. This voyage occupied ten months, during 
which he was at Mobile Bay, Liverpool, Eng., and Newport, Wales, 
from thence the vessel returned to Portland, Me., with a cargo of rail- 
road iron. He then went to Bath, Me., where he again engaged at 
the trade of carpenter, and where he remained two years. On Decem- 
ber 30th,' 1850, he started West via Baltimore & Ohio R. R., going 
as far as Cumberland, Md., thence he walked to Brownsville, Pa., 
where he boarded a steamer and went to Evansville, reaching 
that city January 15, 1851, which he left and went to New 
Harmony afoot the following day. He remained at New Harmony 
until April 26th, when he went to Mt. Vernon, where he worked 
at the trade of carpenter, under Messrs. Hancock and Hen- 
dricks, the leading contractors then. For many years Mr. Brown 
has been the most prominent contractor of Mt. Vernon, and he has 
done more actual work in improving the town than any other man 
who has lived in it. Among the many buildings constructed by him 
are the Presbyterian and M. E. Churches, the high school buildings, 
the residences of Dr. E. V. Spencer, Judge W. P. Edson, General A. 
P. Hovey and A. C. McCallister, and the business block fronting 
on Main, between Second and Third Streets. During the war Mr. 
Brown tendered his services as a private, but on account of disability 
he was rejected. He was Captain of the first Company organized foi 
the First Indiana Legion. He also served four months on a transport 
in the year 1864, when he aided Gen. Banks' army out of Red River. 
Mr. Brown married Miss E. C. Berg, of Bethlehem, Pa., in 1857, who 
died a few years afterward, by whom he has two children living, 
Thomas and Mary. In 1868 he married Miss Margaret Brown, a na- 
tive of Scotland, but a resident of America nearly all her life, 
by whom he has one child, Fannie. Mr. Brown's father died in 1862 
and his mother in 1870, the former being 69 and the latter 72 years of 
age. Several of his ancestors were centenarians. No one stands 
higher for integrity, for generosity and for general worth than Edward 
Brown. 

ALEXANDER CRUNK. 

In Marrs Township, near the site of the town ot Blackford, the 
first seat of justice of Posey County, on the 7th of October, 1836, the 
subject of this sketch first opened his eyes and beheld the light of day. 



122 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 

John Crunk, his grandfather, was a native of Tennessee, emigrating 
from that State and locating in Posey County, about the year 1808. 
He was the father of Timothy D. , who was born after his removal to 
the County and who was the father of Alex. Timothy D. Crunk 
married Miss Ruth Barton in 1832. and by this union four children 
were born, three boys and one girl. The parents of Alex, died when 
he was but thirteen years of age, when he was placed under the care 
of his uncle, Lewis Barton, for whom he labored on the farm three 
years, for his board and clothes. He then engaged himself to another 
uncle, for whom he worked one year, receiving $80 and his board as 
compensation. Being of an independent disposition and wishing to 
depend upon his own energies for a living, he began life as a wood- 
chopper, receiving fifty cents per day for his work, at which, together 
with farm work, he was employed three years. Reaching manhood's 
estate he made a proposal of marriage to Miss Louisa Dixon, who ac- 
cepted, and the wedding was consummated September 17, 1857, by 
which union nine children were born, five of whom are now living. 
From that time until 1 869 he followed the pursuit of farming with 
flattering success, and then removed to Mt. Vernon, where he held 
the position of jailor eighteen months. In the same year he was the 
nominee of the Democratic party for Sheriff and was elected by a full 
majority of the party, defeating Herman Munchhoff. In 1872 he was 
again elected to the office of Sheriff, defeating Jonathan H. Burlison, 
the most popular candidate on the Republican ticket. He served in 
this capacity until 1875, when he returned to his farm, which he man- 
aged with peculiar ability until 1878, when he again went before the 
convention as a candidate for Sheriff, receiving the nomination over 
sixteen aspirants. His opponent at the election was James N. Johnson, 
the regular nominee of the Republican convention. In 1880 he was 
again nominated by his party and defeated Braddock McGregor, an 
independent but very popular candidate. In all his years of public 
life he has observed the principles which emanate from a spirit of fair- 
ness, and by his straightforward, impartial conduct in the management 
of his office he has won a confidence of the people that is decidedly 
praiseworthy. No one, either in public or private life, stands higher 
in the esteem of the people than Alex. Crunk, and to this fact his 
offspring of generations far removed to the future can advert with feel- 
ings of pride. His career from early boyhood to man's estate and 
from that period to the present is without a blemish. Few men there 
are living or have lived who have fought the battle of life and en- 
countered as many obstacles as he have succeeded in maintaining such 
sterling traits of character. Alex, has always been a Democrat of 
the pronounced type and no one has labored more earnestly and sin- 
cerely to perpetuate the institutions of Democracy. If he has been re- 
warded he has deserved his pay. 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 1 23 

JUDGE WM. P. EDSON 

Is a native of Posey County, having been born in Mt. Vernon, May 
14, 1834. His father, Eben D. Edson, in 1828, emigrated from Otsego 
County, New York, locating at Mt. Vernon in the same year, where 
he began the practice of law, in which he soon distinguished himself 
and earned the reputation of being one of the most accomplished prac- 
titioners at the bar. In the year 1829 he was united in marriage to 
Miss Sarah L. Phelps, who came from Litchfield, Connecticut, where 
she was born. Eben D. Edson died March 4, 1846, and during a 
residence of eighteen years in Posey County he held the position of 
Prosecuting Attorney two terms, was elected Treasurer of the County 
one term, was a Representative in the Legislature and occupied the 
position of Judge of the Circuit Court by appointment on several occa- 
sions. The mother of Judge Edson survived her husband until Sept. 2, 
1868, when she died, having lived to see her son attain a high position 
amongst his fellow men, whose greatest confidence and esteem he had 
won by the uniform kindness and genial disposition which he inherited 
from her. Judge Edson entered the common schools of Mt. Vernon 
when quite young, and when he was but twelve years of age his father 
became his preceptor in the study of Latin, at which he showed a pro- 
ficiency rarely exhibited by children of that age. He finished his 
education under the tutorage of Joseph S. Barwick, who was considered 
a finished Greek and Latin scholar and who won the affection of his 
pupils by his courteous demeanor and kind treatment. Immediately 
after bidding adieu to the school room as a student Judge Edson sought 
and obtained a position as the teacher of a school in the country, a few 
miles distant from Mt. Vernon, where he remained one term, when he 
accepted a similar position in town, where he taught two terms. Upon 
the advice of his friends, Judge Edson, when entering upon man's 
estate, read every volume in the library of the township that was 
calculated to enrich his mind. He has always been a close and in- 
dustrious student, and in consequence of this fact he has obtained a 
fund of information, which at once marks him as a man of intelligence 
and thorough mental training, When he was nineteen years of age he 
entered the law office of Judge John Pitcher, with whom he studied 
law two years, when he was admitted to practice. That was in May, 
1855. In October, 1856, he was elected Representative in the Legis- 
lature, being the youngest member of that body. During his term of 
office as a Legislator he was placed upon several very important Com- 
mittees, and was made Chairman of the Committee on the State 
Library. He introduced a bill authorizing a geological survey of the 
State, making several speeches advocating its passage, on which he 
was highly complimented by the leading papers of the State. The bill 



124 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 

became a law at the session of the Legislature which convened the 
year following. In 1858 Judge Edson was elected Prosecuting Attor- 
ney for Posey and Gibson Counties, holding the position one term. In 
i860 he was elected Clerk of the Posey Circuit Court, succeeding 
Turner Nelson, an office he held four years. At the expiration of his 
term of office he resumed the practice of law, which he contin- 
ued until November 25, 1871, when he was appointed Judge of the 
Common Pleas for Posey, Gibson, Vanderburgh and Warrick Coun- 
ties, by Governor Conrad Baker. He presided over this Court one 
year, when he resigned, the salary being deemed insufficient. During 
his incumbency of the Judgeship, Judge Edson, by his impartial and 
able rulings, acquired the reputation as a lawyer of great merit. Since 
then he has followed his profession with a degree of success which 
must be complimentary to him indeed. Judge Edson was married to 
Miss Ruphene Lockwood, of Mt. Vernon, on January 1, 1862, 
by which union they have had five children, three of whom are living. 
Previous to the beginning of the late civil war, Judge Edson was 
a Democrat, but ever since that event he has labored zealously for the 
success of the Republicans. He was nominated Judge of the 
Supreme Court at the Republican State Convention held at Indianap- 
olis in 1876, but he, with the whole Republican ticket, was defeated. 
At that election Judge W. E. Niblack was the opponent of Judge Ed- 
son. In 1866 he was Chairman of the Republican County Central 
Committee, and it was largely owing to his ability in the management 
of affairs that the party was successful in Posey County that year, the 
first time in its history. He not only devoted all his energies and time 
to the end that the Republican party might be successful, but he was 
very liberal in the expenditure of his individual means as well. He 
has been identified very prominently with the growth of the County, 
never failing to respond to such demands as were calculated to promote 
its best interests. He was the chief participant in the movement 
which resulted in the organization of the Mt. Vernon & Grayville 
Railroad Co., of which he was a Director and the Secretary. Such 
men as Judge Edson are not numerous, possessing as he does the men- 
tal and personal attributes of a high and noble manhood. Such men 
as he should be placed in positions of honor and trust, and we know 
of none just at this time which he could fill with greater credit to his 
State than that of Supreme Judge. Posey County should and does 
feel proud of such men as he. 

EDWARD S. HAYES 

Was born April 21, 1836, in Lancaster County, Penn., of which State 
his father and mother, John and Catherine Hayes, were natives. His 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 1 25 

father taught school and worked also at the carpenter's trade for the 
support of the family. In April, 1844, the family emigrated to West 
Point, Iowa, where they remained until the latter part of May follow- 
ing, when they removed to Clark County, Ohio, where the parents 
died in a few months after their arrival. In August, 1844, Edward 
came to Posey County, to live with his uncle, Edward Sweeney, a 
cooper, under whom he learned that trade and with whom he remained 
until March 4, 1854. He then went to Dayton, Ohio, where he 
followed his chosen occupation until March, 1855, when he enlisted as 
a private in the regular army and was sent into rendezvous at Jefferson 
barracks, near St. Louis. He was soon assigned to Company "D," 
First Regiment, U. S. Cavalry. In June, 1855, the regiment went to 
Ft. Leavenworth, remaining there until September following, when it 
went in pursuit of the Sioux Indians, under Genl. Harney, returning in 
three months. In 1856 he was engaged with his regiment in the sup- 
pression of the border ruffians during the troubles in Kansas that year. 
In the Summer of 1857, he was sent on an expedition after the 
Cheyenne Indians,, with whom engagements were had which resulted 
in a loss of 17 killed and 25 wounded to the troops. After their return 
to Ft. Leavenworth, the regiment was ordered into quarters for the 
winter at Ft. Riley. In the Spring of 1858 they were ordered to Utah 
to suppress the Mormons, who were committing outrages upon emi- 
grants to the Pacific Slope, but were recalled before they reached their 
destination, owing to a compromise between those people and the 
peace Commissioners. They then went to the Indian Territory to 
quell the Comanches, with whom they had two engagenients, sustaining 
light losses. The regiment remained at Fort Arbuckle until the Sum- 
mer of 1859, when they were sent to the foot of the Wichita Mountains 
to build a post. Mr. Hayes was discharged from the service at Fort 
Smith, March 4, i860, when he returned to Posey County, remaining 
there until July, 1861, when he enlisted in the service of the Rebellion 
as First Lieutenant of Co. "H," First Ind. Cavalry. He remained in 
the service until January 4, 1862, when he resigned, at Pilot Knob, 
Mo. He then went to St. Louis and was engaged in the recruiting 
service, three months, and then went to Pittsburgh Landing and served 
in the quarter master's department of Genl. Denver's Brigade, remain- 
ing there until August, 1862, when he returned home. On May 28, 
1863, he was united in marriage to Miss Annie Musselman, of Clark 
County, Ohio, by which union nine children were born, six of whom 
are living. Mr. Hayes re-entered the service of the Rebellion in 
January, 1865, and was assigned to the 144th Ind. Infantry Volunteers, 
Hancock's corps. He served as second Lieutenant until August 5th, 
when he was mustered out of service at Winchester, Va., returning 
home in September following. On December 26, 1865, he was elected 



126 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 

Marshal of Mt. Vernon, a position he has held ever since, with the 
exception of two terms. Mr. Hayes has proved himself to be an 
efficient and vigilant officer and he is a man who is fearless in the dis- 
charge of his duty. As a soldier, as a citizen and as an officer he has 
always been worthy of the confidence reposed in him. 

PHILO A. HUTCHESON 

Was born October 25, 1835, on the farm adjoining that section on 
which the town of Blackford, the first seat of justice of Posey County, 
was situated. His father, Win. Hutcheson, was a native of Ireland, 
and was one of the earliest settlers in Marrs Township, at whose house 
the first session of the Commissioner's Court was held. His mother's 
maiden name was Martha Haycock, who was a native of Georgia. 
Their marriage occurred in Posey County, about the year 1815, by 
which union they were blessed with nine children, Philo being the 
youngest. Wm. Hutcheson was a weaver by trade, but depended more 
upon farming for his support after his arrival in this country. When 
Philo was quite young his father died, and at the age of fourteen years 
the care of his mother and sister fell largely upon him. He followed 
the pursuit of a farmer, attending the district school during the Winter 
seasons, where he acquired a knowledge of the ordinary branches of 
education taught in the schools at that time. On March 23, 1856, he was 
married to Miss Harriett Higgins,with whom he lived happily until 
January 28, 1879, w hen she died. By this union they had ten children, 
four daughters and six sons, nine of whom are now living. He was 
again married, on November 6, 1879, to Mrs. Martha Blount. In 
August, 1879, w hile oiling a threshing machine he met with an accident 
by which he was deprived of four fingers. In April, 1872, he removed 
to Mt. Vernon, where ifi June following he was appointed Constable by 
the Board of Commissioners, and at the October election following, 
was elected Constable of Black Township, defeating a popular oppo- 
nent. During his term of office he showed great efficiency, and by his 
courteous treatment and his faithful performance of duty he won many 
friends, who solicited him in the Summer of 1874, to become a candi- 
date before the Democratic County Convention for Recorder. He was 
nominated over four candidates, and at the election which ensued in 
October of the same year, he received a majority of 1,131, the largest 
majority ever received by any candidate in the County. He gave 
universal satisfaction in the management of his office, and as a tribute 
to his capacity and his integrity, he was renominated in 1878, when 
his election was unanimous, he having no opposition. Mr. Hutcheson 
has always been a consistent Democrat, yet this fact has never been 
considered when he offered himself to the suffrage of the people for 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. I 27 

office. Republican votes were cheerfully cast for him, even when he 
could least expect them; a compliment to his character which speaks 
in tones of greatest praise. Whatever may be his aspirations, whether 
of a political nature or what not, they will be treated with a regard 
that must redound to his high standing and his merited rewards. 

MAJOR SYLVANUS MILNER 

Was born at Minerva, Stark County, Ohio, August 24, 1833, 
where he remained until he was eight years of age, when he removed 
with his parents to Wayne County, 111., who resided there until 1844, 
when they located at Mt. Vernon. He acquired an education at the 
common schools and at the State University of Indiana, and when he 
was eighteen years of age, was appointed Deputy Postmaster under 
John Wilson, holding the position two years. He worked at and 
learned the wagon-making trade, but never followed it as an occupa- 
tion after serving an apprenticeship. He followed the occupation of 
merchant's clerk from 1854 to 1862, when he was appointed Surveyor 
of the port of Mt. Vernon. This position he held until 1863, when 
he became fired with the spirit of patriotism, and his desire to serve 
his country led to his enlistment in the service of the Rebellion. He 
organized Companies "A" and "K" of the Tenth Cavalry, Indiana 
Volunteers, and was mustered as Captain of the former Company. 
He served with the Company one year, when he was promoted Major 
of the regiment, remaining in that position until the close of the war. 
Previous to his enlistment in the regular service, he commanded 
a Company of Artillery in the First Indiana Legion. On his return 
from the service he engaged in mercantile pursuits a short time, when 
he began the extensive manufacture of brick. This enterprise led to 
the erection of the Masonic Temple at Mt. Vernon, with which he was 
prominently identified. He was appointed Postmaster by President 
Grant in 1869, and held the position with honor to himself and credit 
to the community, showing great efficiency in the management of the 
office. He resigned in February, 1882. For sixteen years he has 
been a prominent Mason, is a staunch Republican, has considerable 
knowledge of astronomy, and has views of religion peculiar to him- 
self. He is a bachelor, is a man of genial nature and is emphatically 
a man of public spirit. 

GEORGE D. ROWE. 

Few men in the Southern part of the County are better known 
than the subject of this sketch. By his affability, his generosity and 
his other excellent traits of character he has won to himself a host of 



I2 8 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 

fast friends. George Duckworth Rowe was born of poor but respect- 
able parents in Black Township, August 16, 1828. His father, Samuel 
Rowe, a carpenter and farmer, emigrated from North Carolina to 
Posey County in 1809. His mother, also from North Carolina, was 
the daughter of Absalom Duckworth, who came to Posey County in 
1805, and at whose house the first term of the Circuit Court was held. 
George was the third son by the marriage of Samuel Rowe and Mary 
Duckworth, who removed, with their family, to Harrison County, 
Indiana, in' 1830. Here George remained until 1845, when he returned 
to his native home, where he taught school and engaged in farming 
until October, 1872, when he was elected Trustee of Black Township, 
defeating a very popular opponent. He was re-elected in 1874, and 
again in 1876, and when he had served nineteen months on the last 
term he was compelled to vacate the office in favor of his opponent, 
who contested the election on the ground of ineligibility caused by the 
occupancy of the office more than two successive terms, the result of 
an appeal taken to the Supreme Court of the State. The decision of 
the Supreme Court qualified him for the candidacy at the election held in 
October, 1 878, when he again availed himself of the opportunity to repre- 
sent the Township as its Trustee. He was elected in that year by a hand- 
some majority and re-elected in 1880, and is now the incumbent of 
that responsible position. No better index to a man's qualifications 
for office, morally or intellectually, can be found than that which is 
shown in a hearty and continued indorsement of his constituency. 
He is Republican in everything that the word implies. 

He was married to Martha A. Hamilton, of this County, on March 
3, 1852, by which union he has become the father of eleven children, 
which fact implies the opinion that he has faithfully complied with the 
Biblical injunction which teaches all to " multiply and replenish the 
earth." His children are all living, five of whom are married. He is 
public spirited in every sense, and has been a liberal supporter of all 
enterprises calculated to promote the interests of the County. 

HENRY SCHNURR 

Was born December 6, 1825, at Dudenhofen, Hesse Darmstadt, 
where his father for a number of years engaged in the business of 
brewing and distilling. In the year 1838 the family emigrated 
to America, settling in Marrs Township, Posey County, where 
Mr. Schnurr's father entered 160 and purchased 200 acres of land, and 
followed the pursuit of farming. When Henry was 23 years of age 
he was married to Miss Louise Bodamer, the ceremony having been 
performed on the 17th of June, 1848. By this union sixteen children have 
been born, eight of whom are now living. Mr. Schnurr continued the 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 



129 



occupation of a farmer, and succeeded at it until the month of June 
'K 01 he removed to Mt. Vernon, where he purchased the Belle- 
Sre e o1 Ann R S K Ver » nM ** *»* been engaged in the manufac 
ture of flour. He has secured to himself the reputation of an excel- 
lent business man, and his success-the result of indomitable energy 
and executive ability-warrants it most fully. His flour, manufactured 
under a new process, has become famous for its superiority, and in 
consequence of this fact he finds it hard to meet the demands for it 
Mr. Schnurr is a man in whom the utmost confidence can be reposed 
and a man of whom it can be said will meet his obligations with that 
promptness which characterizes sterling integrity. He is a consistent 
Christian, having been a member of the Methodist Church for a num- 
ber of years, and his influence upon his family has been productive of 
much good. Nothing can be said which would reflect upon the honor 
of his children. His son Henry is the manager of the mills at Mt. 
Vernon, and in conducting the business entrusted to him he shows 
marked capacity as a man of business. Mr. Schnurr's sons are all intel- 
ligent young men, and bid fare to "make their mark" in the world 
while his daughters, under the careful training of their devoted and af- 
fectionate mother, show an aptitude in household matters which speaks 
highly of their tutor. Truly, the children are « worthy of their sire. " 
Mrs. Schnurr was born in Germany, but came to America with her par- 
ents at an early day Since her marriage to Mr. Schnurr she has labor- 
ed hard to the end that success might be the terminating point of their 
lives, not only financially but in every other respect, of which she 

Z S M Q ? me fed ^^ In hiS S0dal aS wel1 as business ^!a- 
tons Mr. Schnurr is regarded as an exceptional man. Besides being 

he owner of farming land in Posey County, he owns valuable proper* 
ty m the city of Evansville. l l 

JOSEPH F. WELBORN 

Among the representative men of Posey County not one has identified 
himself with its material growth more creditably than Joseph F Wel- 
,w n U D< V ne 1S th f e who has labored with greater zeal to the end 
tha the County might reach a position second to none in the great 
??l of Ind,ana . ; "J one is there who can lay claim to a more 
emulative spirit of public improvement than he. Indeed, we feel that 
he is entitled to a position that has been reached by few, when we 
consider the extent of his sacrifices of time and contributions of money 
to promote the best interests of his fellow citizens. He has always 
kept in view the prosperity of the County and has been a public bene- 
factor in every sense. Mr. Welborn was born in Guilford County, 
North Carolina, August 6, iSi.X, and in 1833 emigrated with his 



I30 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 

father's family to Mt. Vernon, where his father for five years worked 
at the trade of wagon-making, while his son Joseph cultivated a small 
farm in the vicinity until he was twenty one years of age, when he 
removed to Robinson Township and engaged in stock-raising and 
farming with eminent success, He paid particular attention to fine 
stock and acquired the reputation of being an excellent judge of horses 
and hogs. In 1844 he married Miss Nancy Mills, whose father, David 
Mills, was one of the early settlers of the County and who was a man 
of considerable prominence in his day. Her brother, Felix Mills, was 
elected Sheriff several times and also filled the position of County 
Treasurer, discharging the duties of those offices with great efficiency 
and rare ability. In 1856 Mr. Welborn leased his farm and removed 
to Mt. Vernon, where he associated himself with the late Wm. J. 
Lowry, with whom he engaged very extensively in the grain and pork- 
packing business until 1872, when the firm wos dissolved by mutual 
consent. In that year, in company with Charles A. Parke, E. T. 
Sullivan, and S. M. Leavenworth, he organized the Mt. Vernon Bank- 
ing Company, of which he was chosen President, from which he retired 
in 1877, leaving the institution on the highway of prosperity. In 1858 
he was elected County Treasurer for two years, during which time he 
showed much executive ability and great business capacity. He was 
prominently identified with the organization of the Mt. Vernon and Gray- 
ville Railroad Company, of which he was President until its consolidation 
with the Chicago and Illinois Southern Railway Company. In 1876 
he was the nominee of the Democratic County Convention for Repre- 
sentative in the Legislature and was elected by a handsome majority 
at the regular election of that year. He served in the capacity of 
Legislator two years with honor to himself and credit to the County. 
He was for fifteen years Chairman of the Democratic Central Com- 
mittee, and was also a Delegate to the National Convention held at 
Chicago, in 1864, when George B. McClellan was nominated as the 
Democratic candidate for the Presidency of the United States. In 
1881 he actively participated in securing an appropriation of money 
and the right of way to aid the E. & T. H. R. R. in the construction 
of its line through the County to Mt. Vernon, contributing not only 
time but money for the success of the movement. A half century hence 
the name of Joseph F. Welborn will be mentioned with a feeling of 
greater, veneration than it is now perhaps. It will be written in 
connection with emulative deeds and acts which perpetuate memory 
through the ages. 



Directory 



POSEY COUNTY DIRECTORY 

FOR 1882. 



Note. — Post-office addresses we in Small Capitals. 

The places of Residence are indicated by the name of Townships 
or Towns. 



A 



Abbott Thomas, clergyman, Mt. Vernon 

Abro I, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Acuff Samuel (col), Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Acuff Wm, blacksmith, Mt. Vernon 

Adams Barbara, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Adams B F, farmer, Robb twp, Stewartsville 

Adams John, farmer, Bethel twp, New Harmony 

Adams Joseph B, teacher, Center twp, Wadesville 

Adamson Charles, farmer, Marrs twp, West Franklin 

Adamson David, farmer. Marrs twp, West Franklin 

Adamson Indiana, Marrs twp, West Franklin 

Adamson John, Marrs twp, West Franklin 

Ades David M, Bethel twp. New Harmony 

Adkins W R, Bethel twp, New Harmony 

Ailsworth Abro," farmer, Marrs twp, West Franklin 

Akers James, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Albright Columbus A, teacher, Mt. Vernon 

Albright Joseph H, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Albright Luke, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Albright Mary, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Albright Peter, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Albrits Catherine, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Aldrich David, farmer, Lynn twp, Grafton 



132 



POSEY COUNTY DIRECTORY 



Aldrich Emily, Lynn twp, Grafton 

Aldrich Esbon, farmer, Lynn twp, Grafton 

Aldrich John, farmer, Lynn twp, Ck vfton 

Aldrich John T, farmer, Lynn twp. Grafton 

Aldrich Luke, farmer, Lynn twp, Grafton 

ALl>RItH MARION, farmer, Lynn twp, Grafton 

Aldrich Marion S, farmer, Lynn twp, Grafton 

Aldrich Noah Mc, farmer, Lynn twp, Grafton 

Aldrich Thomas L, farmer, Lynn twp, Grafton 

Aldrich Wm S, farmer, Lynn twp, Grafton 

ALEXANDER CHAI1L.ES, Justice, Black twp, Mr. Vernon 

Alexander Eleanor, Lynn twp, Grafton 

Alexander George R, farmer, Lynn twp, Grafton 

Alexander James E, farmer, Lynn twp, Grafton 

Alexander Leander, farmer, Black twp, Mr. Vernon 

ALEXANDER MARSHALL, assessor Lynn twp, Grafton 

ALEXANDER JIATILttA Mrs, literateur, Mt. Vernon 

Alexander Thomas B, farmer, Robb twp, Stewartsville 

Alexander Wm (col), farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Alexander Wm D, farmer, Lynn twp, Mt. Vernon 

Alexander Wm E, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Alldredge Abijah, farmer, Black twp. Mt. Vernon 

Alexander A J Sr, farmer, Black twp, Mr. Vernon 

Alldredge Alonzo T, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Alldredge Anderson, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Alldredge Barney, farmer, Lynn twp, Grafton 

Alldredge Benjamin, fanner, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Alldredge Clinton, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Alldredge Cornelius, farmer, Foint twp, Mt. Vernon 

Alldredge Edward, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Alldredge Eli, farmer, Mt. Vernon 

Alldredge Elijah, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Alldredge Enoch, farmer; Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Alldredge Henry, farmer, Plack twp, Mt. Vernon 

Alldredge Jefferson, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Alldredge Joharen, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Alldredge John B H, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Alldredge John S, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Alldredge Joseph, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Alldredge Josiah, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Alldredge Lavega, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Alldredge Semonin, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Alldredge Lemoin, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Alldredge Leroy, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 



POSEY COUNTY DIRECTORY. 1 33 

Alldredge Marion F, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Alldredge Napoleon, farmer, Black twp, Grafton 

ALLHREHG l<: NELSON, farmer, Black twp, Grafton 

Alldredge O H, painter, Mt. Vernon 

ALLDREDGE PARISH, farmer, Black twp, Grafton 

Alldredge Parson, farmer, Black twp, Grafton 

Alldredge Samuel, farmer, Black twp, Grafton 

Alldredge Sarah J, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Alldredge Sarah M, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Alldredge Robert, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Alldredge Thomas D, farmer, Black twp, Mt, Vernon 

Alldredge T J, Bethel twp, New Harmony 

Alldredge Wm, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Alldredge Wm S, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Alldridge A J jun, laborer Mr Vernon 

Alldridge Rufus, Center twp. Wadesville 

Alldridge Thomas, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Allen Avery, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Allen Charles, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Allen George F, farmer, Lynn twp, Grafton 

Allen |, harnessmaker, Cynthiana 

ALLEN J THOMAS, brickmason, Mt. Vernon 

Allen Wm. brickmason, Mt. Vernon 

Allison B F, laborer, Mt. Vernon 

Allison & Son, Gen Store, Wadesville 

Allison Christopher, laborer Mt. Vernon 

Allison Finley sr, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

Allison Finley jr, farmer, Cehter twp, Wadesville 

Allison Gabriel. Constable, Lynn twp, Solitude 

Allison George W, farmer, Lynn twp, Grafton 

Allison J M, farmer, Lynn twp, Grafton 

Allison Thomas, farmer, Black twp, Grafton 

Allyn A H, farmer, Black twp, Farmersville 

Allyn Alanson, merchant, Caborn 

Allyn Alonzo, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Allyn Elisha, farmer, Black twp, Farmersville 

Allyn Daniel, Lynn twp, Solitude 

Allyn Francis, farmer, Black twp, Farmersville 

Allyn James L, farmer, Black twp, Farmersville 

Allyn John L, farmer, Lynn twp, Farmersville 

Allyn Joseph, farmer, Black twp, Farmersville . 

Allyn M F, farmer, Black twp, Farmersville 

Allyn Perry, farmer, Black twp, Farmersville 

Allyn Sidney, Justice of the Peace, Mt. Vernon 



134 



POSEY COUNTY DIRECTORY. 



Allyn Walter, farmer, Black twp, Farmersville 

Allyn W C, farmer, Lynn twp, Grafton 

Alman Bennett, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Alman E B, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Alman John J. farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Alman John L, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Alman Joseph H, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Alman Thomas B, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Alman Wra, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Alsop David, miller, New Harmony 

Alsop Henry, laborer, New Harmony 

Alsop James, laborer, New Harmony 

Alsop John, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Alsop Jonathan, carpenter, New Harmony 

Alsop Wra, laborer, New Harmony 

Alsop Wilson, undertaker, New Harmony 

Alstad Henry, farmer, Marrs twp, Carbon 

Althouse Dalton, millwright, New Harmony 

Althouse John, millwright, New Harmony 

Alvy Anthony, farmer, Lynn twp, Solitude 

Aman Benjamin, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Aman John, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Aman Joseph, merchant, St. Wendel 

Ambruster Barnabas Jun, farmer, Mr. Vernon 

Anderson Benjamin, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Anderson Eli T, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Anderson George, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Anderson Isaac, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Anderson James, farmer, Black twp. Mt. Vernon 

Anderson James, laborer, Mt. Vernon 

Anderson Jefferson, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Anderson Levi S, Center twp, Blairsville 

Anderson L W Robb twp, Stewartsville 

Anderson Richard, laborer, New Harmony 

Anderson W J, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Anderson Wm. Robb twp, Stewartsville 

Anderson Wm, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Anslin^er John, farmer, Marrs twp, West Franklin 

Ante Frank, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Anton Robert, Center twp, Wadesville. 

Apman Henry, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Appel B, carpenter St. Phillip 

Appel George, farmer, Marrs twp, St. Phillip 

Appel Henry, Marrs twp, St. Phillip 



POSEY COUNTY DIRECTORY. 

Appel Jacob, Robinson twp, Blairsville 
Appel John, Marrs twp, St. Phillip 
Appel Macy, Marrs twp, St. Phillip 
Appel Phillip, Robinson twp, Blairsville 
Applegate Wm, laborer New Harmony 
Armstrong Frank, laborer, New Harmony 
Armstrong Jacob, Robb twp, Stewartsville 
Armstrong T J, farmer, Lynn twp, Solitude 
Armstrong Wm, Lynn twp, Solitude 
Arnick Wm, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 
Arnoldy Frank, cooper, New Harmony 
Asel Martin, Smith twp, Cynthiana 
Ashworth A J sr, farmer, Mr. Vernon 
Ashworth A J jr, clerk, Mt. Vernon 
Ashworth B F, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 
Ashworth George W, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 
Ashworth John A, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 
Ashworth John W, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 
Ashworth Moses, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 
Ashworth Thomas G, teamster, Mt. Vernon 
Ashworth Thomas J, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 
Ashworth Vey, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 
Auch Frederick, laborer, New Harmony 
Aufierhart John, Robinson twp, Blairsville 
Ausley Samuel, Center twp, Wadesville 
Ausley Thomas, Lynn twp, Solitude 
Axton Charles, Harmony twp, New Harmony 
Axton Enoch, Harmony twp. New Harmony 
Axton Isham, Harmony twp, New Harmony 
Axton James M, Harmony twp, New Harmony 
Axton John S, Robb twp, Poseyville 
Axton Levi, Harmony twp, New Harmony 
Axton Thomas J, Harmony twp, New Harmony 
Axton Wm B, Harmony twp, New Harmony 
Ayers Joseph, laborer, Mt. Vernon 



35 



B 



Bacon & Bloomer, livery stable, Mt. Vernon 
Bacon Elizabeth, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 
Bacon Wm. S, (Bacon & Bloomer,) Mt. Vernon 
Bachman Linius, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Yernon 
Bachman Michael, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 



I36 POSEY COUNTY DIRECTORY. 

Bailey Benjamin, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Bailey C W, Bethel twp, New Harmony 

Bailey Elijah, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Bailey Elisha, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Bailey James J, County Commissioner, Lynn twp, New Harmony. 

Bailey Matilda. Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Bailey Wm, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Baine, Mary E, (widow,) Mi Vernon 

Baker Charles, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Baker Chas C, clerk, Mt. Vernon 

Baker George W, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Baker Herrman, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Baker Jacob, shoemaker. Wadesville 

Baker John M, Robb twp, Stewatsyii.i.e 

Baker Peter, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Baker Samuel (col), Black twp, Mr. Vernon 

Baker Samuel M, Robb twp, Stewartsville 

Baker Thomas L, Constable, Mt. Vernon 

Baker T J, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Baker Wm, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Baker Wm H, laborer Mt. Vernon 

Baker Herman, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Baldwin Abram, (Baldwin & Ruchti), New Harmony 

Baldwin & Ruchti, blacksmiths & wagonmakeis New Harmony 

Baldwin Bedford B, Lynn twp, New Harmony 

Baldwin Edward, blacksmith (Baldwin & Bishop) New Harmoxv 

Baldwin Eliza, Bethel twp, New Harmony 

Baldwin Henry, laborer, Mt. Vernon 

Baldwin Jessie, Bethel twp, New Harmony 

Baldwin John W, tinner, New Harmony 

Baldwin Wifford, Bethel twp, New Harmony 

Baldwin Wm, Justice of the Peace, New Harmony 

Baldwin Wm, tinner, New Harmony 

Bambie George, Harmony twp. New Harmony 

Bandy S P, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Bane Henry, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Bane Herman, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Bane Theodore, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Banks H B, Robb twp, Poseyyille 

Barbara August, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Barbry Isaac, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Barden Joseph, Robinson twp, Blairsyiij.k 

Barker Gabe (col), laborer, Mt. Vernon 

Barlow John, Marrs twp, Caborn 



POSEY COUNTY DIRECTORY. 1 37 

Barnberg Herman, Marrs twp, Caeorn 

Barnett J S, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Barnett Lycurgus, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Barnett M B, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Barnett M W, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Barnett S M, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Barnett Sylvanus, farmer, Mt. Vernon 

Barnett Wm, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Baronet Sylvanus, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Barow George, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Barow John, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Barrett A W, farmer, Bobb twp, Stewartsville 

Barrett George M, farmer, Bobb twp, Stewartsville 

Barrett George N, farmer, Robb twp, Stewartsville 

Barrett Harrison, farmer, Robb twp, Stewartsville 

Barrett H T, farmer, Robb Twp, Stewartsville 

Barrett John N, farmer, Robb twp, Stewartsville 

Barrett Joseph A, Justice of the Peace, New Harmony 

Barrett Lewis N, farmer, Harmonv twp, New Harmony 

Barrett Minerva, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Barrett Wm A, farmer, Robb twp, Stewartsville 

Barry Thomas, farmer, New Harmony 

BARTER & C'O, hardware and agricultural impts, Mt. Vernon 

Barter Charles H, blacksmith, Mt. Vernon 

Barter Edward F, carriage maker Mt. Vernon 

Barter Elizabeth, Marrs twp, West Franklin 

Barter Henry C, (Barter & Co,) Mt. Vernon 

Barter James M, editor " Sun," Mt. Vernon 

BARTER JOHN H, blacksmith and wagonmaker, Mt. Vernon 

Barter John M, (Barter & Co,) Mt. Vernon 

Barter Julius, farmer, Black twp, Mt, Vernon 

Barter Richard F, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

BARTER RICHARD F COL, farmer, Mt. Vernon 

Barter Vina, widow, Black twp, Farmersville 

Barton Alfred, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Barton Charles N, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Barton James M, Constable, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Barton Job, farmer, Lynn twp, Solitude 

BARTON JOHN, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Barton Major, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Barton Robert, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Barton Samuel, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Barton Samuel, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

Barton Thomas, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 



I38 POSEY COUNTY DIRECTORY. 

Barton Wm B, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Barton Wm P, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Barton Wilson J, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Barthel Adam, Marrs twp, Caborn 

BARTHELEMY I SI DO It. 2d hand store & junk store, New 

Harmony 
Bartlett George, laborer, New Harmony 
Baseler Frederick, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 
Bastnagel B H, carpenter, St. Phillip 
Batchelor George, cooper, Mt. Vernon 
Bates Daniel, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 
Bates Hannah, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 
Bates Robert, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Yernon 
Bauer Jacob, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 
Baumann George sr, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 
Beal Charles, marble worker New Harmony 
Beal Eugene, Robb twp, Poseyville 
Beal George L, carpenter, New Harmony 
Beal Henry B, miller, New Harmony 
Beard Maria F (widow), Mt. Vernon 
Beazley John, Marrs twp, Caborn 
Becker Henry, Center twp, Wadesville 
Becker Jacob, Center twp, Wadesville 
Becker John, Center twp, W'adesville 
Beckley Henry, Bethel twp, New Harmony 
Beckley Louis, farmer, Point twp, Hovey 
Becktold Lewis, Robb twp, Stewartsville 
Bedell G T, saloon New Harmony 
Behrick Ferdinand, carpenter, Mt. Vervon 
Bermiller George W, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 
Bermiller Jacob, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 
Bermiller John jr, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 
Bermiller John sr, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 
Beiger John, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 
Belks Christian, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 
Bell Enoch D, former, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 
Bell Isaac J, Assessor, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 
Bell James W, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 
Bell John A, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 
Bell J R, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 
Bell Warren S, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 
Bening Adam, farmer, Robinson twp. Blairsville 
Benner Charles, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 
Benner Felix, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 



POSEY COUNTY DIRECTORY. 1 39 

Benner James A, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Benner John, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Benner John L, Justice of the Peace, Caborn 

Benner Mary, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Benner Romelia, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Bennett J M, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Bennett James S, clerk, New Harmony 

Bennett Levi, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Bennett Percy P, clerk, New Harmony 

Bennett W D, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Benshal Samuel, farmer, Black twp, Mt Vernon 

Bensley Wm, farmer, Black twp. Mr. Vernon 

Bentley Wm J, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Bente Rheinhardt, Marrs twp, West Franklin 

Benthall Jacob, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

Benton A W, laborer, Mt. Vernon 

Benton Benjamin, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Benton Charles, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Benton George W, Harmony twp, New Harmonx 

Benton Mrs G H, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Benton John, farmer, Lynn twp, New Harmony 

Benton J W, laborer, Mt. Vernon 

Berends Wm, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Bergan E S, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Berger Casper, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn, 

Berridge J W, general store, Cynthiana 

Berry George W, cook, Mt. Vernon 

Berry Gibson, (col,) laborer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Berry Henry, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Berry Wm H, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Beste Frederick, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Beste Wm, Mt. Vernon 

Bertram Caroline, (widow,) Mt. Vernon 

Bertram Henry, laborer, Mt. Vernon 

Bistie C, saloon, Cynthiana 

Bitz L B, physician, Blairsville 

Bitz Stephen, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Biegler Peter, farmer. Smith twp, Cynthiana 

RIJTCKI'Jt FRAIK, Guns & amunition Mt. Vernon 

Biggs Wm (col), laborer, Mt. Vernon 

Bingemar Catherina, Robinson twp. Blairsville 

Bischoff Jacob. (Jacob Bischoff & Co), Mt. Vernon 

RISC HOFF JACOB «fc C 1 0. grocers, Mt. Vernon 

BISHOP FRED, blacksmith (Baldwin & Bishop), New Harmony 



140 POSEY COUNTY DIRECTORY. 

Bishop John T, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Bishop Lawrence, fanner, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Bishop Patience (col widow), Mt. Vernon 

Bishop Perne (col), drayman, Mt. Vernon 

Bishop Vigil, farmer, Black twp, Farmersville 

Bishop W W, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Bittinger Andrew, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Bittinger Anton, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Bitzer Wm, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Black Charles, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Black George H, farmer, Lynn twp, Solitude 

Black George VV jr, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Black George W sr, farmer. Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Black Hugh, farmer, Lynn twp, Solitude 

Black James W, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Black Mary A, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

BLACK HILTOtf, capitalist, Mt. Vernon 

Black Newton, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

BLACK THOJIAS T, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Black Wilke, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Black Wm, boarding house, Mt. Vernon 

Black Wm N, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Black Wm S, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Blackburn B A, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Blackburn James M, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Blackburn Wm J, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Blackburn Wilson, farmer. Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Blake James, Center twp, Wadesville 

Bland David, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Bland Joseph, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Blankenship W S, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Blensinger Frederick, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Blensinger Hannah, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Blesch Thomas J, drayman, Mt. Vernon 

Bliss Isaac N, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Blockley Charles, laborer, Mt. Vernon 

Blockley Frank T, farmer, Point twp, Hovey 

Blockley Russell, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Bloomer Smith (Bacon & Bloomer), Mt. Vernon 

Blount David, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Blount Samuel, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Boatsum Adam, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Boberg August, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Boberg Ernest, farmer, Lynn twp, Wadesville 



POSEY COUNTY DIRECTORY. 14I 

Bogem Albert, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Boggs W P, farmer, Lynn twp, Solitude 

Bolaver John, Marrs twp, West Franklin 

Bolen Louis (col), farmer, Black twp, Mr, Vernon 

Bolen Millard, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

Bolton Frank D, Attorney at Law, New Harmony 

Bond Wm, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Boner Adam, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Boner Henry, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Bonnell Alonzo, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Bonnell Charles V, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Bonenberger Phillip, laborer, Mt. Vernon 

Booth W D, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Booth Turner, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Booth S T, farmer, Point twp, Mr. Vernon 

Booten Alvin, laborer, Mt. Vernon 

Booten John, laborer, Mt. Vernon 

Bordmer Wm, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Boren Absalom, traveling agent, New Harmony 

Boren James, saddler, New Harmony 

Boren John D, Bethel twp, New Harmony 

Boren Wm S, Deputy County Treasurer, Mt. Vernon 

Bortil , blacksmith, Cynthiana 

Bosnagel Henry, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 
Bosnagle John M, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 
Bottomley James, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 
Bouts Wm, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 
Bowers C F, laborer, New Harmony 
Bowers C W, steamboatman, New Harmony 
Bowers Joseph, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 
Bowers Susan, (widow) Black twp, Mt. Vernon 
Bowles T J, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana. 
Bowman, Joseph, carpenter, St. Phillip 
Boyce Edward, town Marshal, New Harmony 
Boyce G W, farmer, Mt. Vernon 
BOYCE WM L. (Fuhrer & Boyce), Mt. Vernon 
Boyd Wm (col), laborer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 
Boyle Hiram, Farmer, Robb twp, Stewartsville 
Boyle James F, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 
Boyle James M, farmer, Robb twp, Stewartsville 
Boyle John H, farmer, Robb twp, Stewartsville 
Boyle Seionel H, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 
Boyle Wm T, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 
Boyls James H, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 



CHAS, F, ARTES, 



S^=DEALER IN: 



Diamonds, (fe^Klfe|ksg) Clocks, &c. 



Watches, 




Silver Ware, : / W V ' 

£To. ISO 2wT^_IiT STREET, 
Personal Attention given to Repairing Fine Watches and Clocks. 



J. F. SCHIELA. 



C. SCHIELA. 



J. F. SCHIELA &. BR0„ 



DEALERS IN 



FURNITURE 

COFFINS & SHROUDING, 

Corner Main «& Water Streets, 

MT. VERXON, OTD. 

J9» Mattress and Cabinet Work of all kinds done on short notice 
at reasonable rates. Give us a call. 



POSEY COUNTY DIRECTORY. T43 

Bozeman Virgil P, banker, Poseyville 

Bradley Benjamin F, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Bradley Clay, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Bradley Samuel, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Bradley Thomas J, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Brand David, farmer, Bethel twp, New Harmony 

Brandenstein Charles, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Brandenstein Peter, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Brandt Henry, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Brandt Simon, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Brandt Wm, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Brasstl James A, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Brash Caspar, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Bratz Henry, blacksmith, Mt. Vernon 

Braun Jacob, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Braunt August, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Brawser Christian, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Brawser Henry L, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Bray Wm, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Breece David, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Breece David, jr, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Breece J C, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Breece Silas, teacher, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Breeden M B, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Breeze Covington, carpenter, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Breeze James, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Breeze John, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Breeze Joseph, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Veanon 

Breeze Sarah, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Breeze Wm, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Breiner Anton, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Breith Jacob, merchant, New Harmony 

Bremer Francis, farmer, Marrs, twp, Caborn 

Brennan James, farmer, Lynn twp, Solitude 

UKETTXEK I.OUIS, Hotel de Brettner, Mt. Vernon 

Brewer Ed P, carpenter, New HArmony 

Brewer F M, farmer, Lynn twp, New Harmony 

Brewer H E, New Harmony 

Bridon J F, farmer, Bethel twp, New Harmony 

Brill Adam, Mt. Vernon 

Brinkman Chas W, (H Brinkman & Sons,) Mt. Vernon 

BKIXKJIAX H «& SOtfS, blacksmiths, wagon and tile makers 

and agricultural implements, Mt. Vernon 
KKIX K>l V\ HMRY, (H Brinkman & Sons,) Mt. Vernon 



ESTABLISHED 1847. 



WILLIAM HEILMAN, 



Manufacturer of 



Engines,Boilers,SawMills,Tlireshers,Copper&SlieetIronWork&c. 




HEILMAN PLOW CO., 

Manufacturers of 

STEEL PLOWS, DOUBLE SHOVELS, ETC. 

First Street, between Ingle & Pine, 



POSEY COUNTY DIRECTORY. 



M5 



Brinkman Henry A, (Brinkman & Sons,) Mt. Vernon 

Brinkmeyer Louis, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

Britton Britton S, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Britton Joseph, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Britton Wm C, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Broadhead Sarah, (widow,) Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Brookins F E, farmer Lynn twp, Grafton 

Brookins Milton, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Brookins Oscar, farmer, Lynn twp, Solitude 

Brookins Sylvester, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Brooks G A, farmer, Bethel twp, New Harmony 

Brooks John, farmer, Bethel twp, New Harmony 

Brooks L D, physician, New Harmony 

Brooks R J, Bethel twp, New Harmony 

Brooks Richard, meat market, New Harmony 

Brothers Louis, farmer, Robb twp, -Stewartsville 

BROWxY EDWARD, carpenter and postmaster, Mt. Vernon 

Brown George, laborer L & N Ry, Mt. Vernon 

Brown George (col), laborer, Mt. Vernon 

Brown Harry (col), farmer, Lynn twp, Solitude 

Brown Henry, clothier, New Harmony . 

Brown Jacob, Center twp, Wadesville 

Brown John, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Brown R J, farmer, Smith twp, CyNthiana 

Brown Wm, farmer, Lynn twp, Grafton 

Broyles James, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Broyles J H, jr, Smith twp, Cynthiana" 

Brice George W, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Bruce George, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Bruce James R, farmer, Lynn twp, Solitude 

Bruger August, farmer, Robinson fwp, Blairsville ' 

Bruger Frank, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Brugerman Geo J, Mr. Vernon 

Bruit Edwin, farmer. Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Bruit J. M, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

BRIMEEHAIS, WM H, clerk, Mt. Vernon 

Brune Frederick, farmer, Lynn twp, Solitude 

Bryan Eugene, Barkeeper, Mt. Vernon 

Bryant Henry, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

Bryant M W, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Bryant Richard, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Bryant Wm, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Buckhannan Henry, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Buckhannan Joseph, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 



GEORGE MILLER. PETER MARKER. 



COZCIC 1 ' i kaX%q/c §1 £So 



DEALERS IN 



RELIABLE BOOTS &. SHOES. 

NO. 208 MAIN STREET, 

EVAHSVILLE, IUD. 



We assure our patrons that we will sell them good and solid goods 
at the very lowest prices. 

fcirWE WARRANT ALL OUR GOODS. °m 

1866 1882 

CONRAD MAIER, 

MERCHANT TAILOR, 

Has Removed to his HEW STAND, 

COB. ^CIXjL <SS THIIRID STREETS, 
MT. VE^UOIT, IlTD- 

Where he keeps constantly on hand a NEW, FULL, LARGE 
and WELL SELECTED STOCK of CASSIMERES and 
CLOTHS. He GUARANTEES BETTER FITS and will 
make suits of the same material for less than can be made anywhere 
else in the city. 



POSEY COUNTY DIRECTORY. I4 y 



Buckhannan Marion, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Buckhannan Phillip, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Buckhannan Samuel, blacksmith, Mt Vernon 

Buckhannon Wm, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Bucklin G W, Physician, New Harmony 

Buckner Henry, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Buckner Louis, (col,) laborer, Mt. Vernon 

Buckwinkle Anton, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Buedel Balshazzar, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Bullet James, Lynn twp, Solitude 

Bundy Benoni S, farmer, New Harmony 

Bundy C C, farmer, Lynn twp, New Harmony 

Bundy Charles T, farmer, Lynn twp, New Harmony 

Bundy W F, farmer, Lynn twp, New Harmony 

Burch Allen, farmer, Marrs twp, West Franklin 

Burchfield John, Livery stable, Cynthiana 

Burchfield Larkin, Livery stable, Cynthiana 

Burgard Joseph, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Burlison Adam H, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Burlison Isaac N, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Burlison Jerome, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Burlison Mary A (widow), Mt. Vernon 

Burlison Thomas B, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Burnett George, laborer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Burns Theodore, farmer, Robb twp, Poscyville 

Burrows Benjamin, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Burrows James, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Burrows John, farmer, Harmony twp", New Harmony 

Burtis Wm F, city treasurer, Mt. Vernon 

Bush George, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Busk ill Peter, farmer, Marrs twp, West Franklin 

Butler Clark A, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Butler Enoch, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Butler C W, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Butler F L, farmer, Bethel twp, New Harmony 

Butler George P (col), laborer, Mt. Vernon 

Butler John M, laborer, Mt. Vernon 

Butler J T, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Butler Larkin, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Butler Wm, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Butts Mary (widow), Mt. Vernon 

Byrd Elizabeth (widow), Lynn twp, Solitude 

Byrd Jonathan, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

BYRtfE TII4MI AS. grocer, Mt. Vernon 



C. f. Wot, 



DEALER IN 



Drugs, Medicines, Chemicals, 

Jfine toilet Soaps, Brusbes, Combs, dc 

Perfumery and Fancy Toilet Articles in Great Variety. 

Pure Brandy, Wines and Liquors for Medical Purposes. 

I£To- <l Second Street, 

IT. YEMO\, Itf D. 

Physicians' Prescriptions Accurately Compounded. 



GEORGE HENRICH, 

FASHIONABLE HAIRDRESSING 

AND 

SXXiiVZlTG SAZ.002T. 

Also dealer in 

Cigars and Tobacco, Gent's Furnishing Goods, 

CANES, UMBRELLAS and TOILET ARTICLES of every 

Description of the Best Quality and PRICES 

TO SUIT THE TIMES. 

WEST SIDE of MAIN STREET, bet. Second & Third Sts, 
HIT. VERNON, INDIANA. 



POSEY COUNTY DIRECTORY, 



49 



Cershaw Thomas, farmer, Bethel twp, Griffin 

Cable Henry (col), laborer, Mt. Vernon 

Caborn James L, Constable Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Caborn John L, Constable Marrs twp, Caborn 

Caborn Kate M (widow), Marrs twp, Caborn 

Caborn Walter S, merchant, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Caldwell Alex (col), laborer, Mt. Vernon 

Caldwell E R, Bethel twp, New Harmony 

Caldwell Frank A, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Caldwell George (col), laborer, Mt. Vernon 

Caldwell Thomas (col), farmer, Point twp, Mr. Vernon- . 

Cale James, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Cale John, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Cale Joseph, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Calvert J C, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Calvert Martha, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Calvin J E, saloon, Stewartsville • 

Calvin Job, Bethel twp, New Harmony 

Calvin Margaret, Bethel twp, New Harmony 

Calvin Mark, farmer, Robb twp, Stewartsville 

CalviN Wm J, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Cambrow Henry, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Camie Alfred, farmer, New Harmony .. 

Camie John, laborer, New Harmony ' ; ^ 

Campbell, Daniel, farmer, Black twp-, Mt. Vernon ''■' .',' .'"■ 

Campbell Grach, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

Campbell James B, teacher, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Campbell J D, farmer, Bethel twp, New Harmony 

Campbell John, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon *' 

Campbell Lafayette, laborer, Mt. Vernon 

Cantrell W F, farmer, Bethel twp, New Harmony ; ' 

Carey Wm P, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Cargal J L, farmer, Bethel twp, Griffin 

Carnahan George, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Carnahan James H, farmer, Lynn twp, Wadesville 

Carney Wm, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

CARPENTER 4 II A Bt ILS J, bank clerk, Mt. Vernon 

Carr Charles, (col, ) laborer, Mt. Vernon 

CAK It EOWOT, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Carr James C, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Carr Stafford, laborer, Mt. Vernon 



i'i>y 



■':•>;; - 



fir* ' t 



150 POSEY COUNTY DIRECTORY. 

Carrier John D, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Carrier, L D, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Carroll Samuel, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Carroll Thomas, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Carroll Wesley T, farmer, Lynn twp, Solitude 

Carson Henry C, Marrs twp, West Franklin 

Carson Taylor, Marrs twp, West Franklin 

Carson W A, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Carter Abraham, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Carter I N, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Carter James P, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Carter Peter, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Carter S N, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Carvener Frank, farmer, Black. twp, Mt. Vernon 

Cartwright Freelove, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Cartwright G W, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Cartwright John W, Trustee Center twp, Wadesville 

Cartwright Lafayette, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Cartwright Prestley, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Cartwright Robert F, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

Cartwright Sarah, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Cartwright Thomas, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

Cartwright Vincent M, Trustee Lynn twp, New Harmony 

Cartwright W D, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Cartwright W G, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Case John R, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Casta! Isaac, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

CASTILLER JAMES, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

CASTILL.ER JOHN, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Castiller Wm, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Cater John F, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Cater Nancy, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Causey David B, farmer, Lynn twp, Mt. Vernon 

Causey G B, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

Causey James H, farmer. Center twp. Wadesville 

Causey Joel H, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

Causey Louisa C, Center twp, Wadesville 

Causey Samuel, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

Causey Wm. Bradford, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

Cavett John P, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

Cavett Mary (widow), Center twp, Wadesville 

Cavett Wm., farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

Cawthorne John, laborer, New Harmony 

Chadwick Charles, ferryman, New Harmony 



POSEY COUNTY DIRECTORY. I5I 

Chaffin James H, New Harmony 

Chaffin Lycurgus, New Harmony 

Chamberlain F M, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Chamberlain F N, longshoreman, Mt. Vernon 

Chamberlain Henry, carpenter, Mt. Vernon 

Chamberlain Joseph, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Chappelsmith John C, literateur, New Harmony 

CHARLES W II, MS. books & stationery, Mt. Vernon 

Chastien Wm, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Cherry Leonard, farmer, Lynn twp, Solitude 

Christy Charles, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Christy John, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Christy Wm H, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Churchill Joseph (col), laborer, Mt. Vernon 

Clanbenspies John, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Clara John C, laborer, New Harmony* 

CLARK A J, watches & jewelry, Mt. Vernon 

Clark James, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Clark John, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Clark Joseph L, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Clark Louis, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Clark Robert, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Clark Thomas, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Clarke John, drayman, Mt. Vernon 

Clarke Tall, laborer, Mt. Vernon 

Clayton Peter, farmer, Lynn twp, New Harmony 

Clayton Wm, saloon, Bethel twp, Griffin 

Cleaveland A J, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Cleaveland Jessie, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Cleavland Wm, farmer, Robb itwp, Poseyville 

Clemens Willis (col), laborer, Mt. Vernon 

Clements Albert, brickmaker, Cynthiana 

Clergy, Thomas, cooper, Mt. Vernon 

Cleveland A J, grocer, Cynthiana 

Cline F N, New Harmony 

Clunger Elkana, Marrs twp, West Franklin 

Clutter Jesse H, cooper, Mt. Vernon 

Cobert George W, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Cochran H S, Bethel twp, New Harmony 

Cole W J, physician, Blairsville 

Coleman Elizabeth, Lynn twp, New Harmony 

Coleman Leroy, farmer, Lynn twp, New Harmony 

Coleman Margaret, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Coleman Robert E, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmon* 



152 . POSEY COUNTY DIREDTORY. 

Coleman Scott, farmer, Lynn twp, New Harmony 

Collier Z, carpenter, Mi. Vernon 

Collins E, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

COLLIN FRAtfK, fisherman, New Harmony 

Collins Martin V, farmer. Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Collins Thomas, Editor & Prop. "Posey Banner," Mt. Vernon 

Collins Thomas E, farmer Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Combs .\Ym, Mt. Vernon 

Conners B W, laborer, New Harmony 

Conner F W, farmer, Bethel twp, New Harmony 

Conner James W, farmer,. Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Conlin Charles, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Conlin Charles F, farmer,. Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Conlin Frank, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Conlin Thomas, farmer,. Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Conlin Wm T, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Conover David, farmer, Black twp, Farmersville 

Cook Charles E, Robb.twp, Stewartsville 

Cook Jacob, tailor, Beairsville 

Cook John, farmer, Point twp, Mr. Vernon 

Coon Frank M, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Coonrod John, farmer, Center . twp, Wadesville 

Coonrod John T, fanner, Lynn twp, New Harmony 

Coonrod Perry, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Coonrod Reuben, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

Coonrod William, farmej, .Lynn twp, Solitude 

Cooper James A, attorney at law, New Harmony 

Cooper David C, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Cooper George, Harmony .twp, New Harmony 

Cooper Henry J, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Cooper Robert J, farmer,, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Cooper Thomas E, (col) farmer, Point twp Mt. Vernon 

Copeiand Amos, Poseyville 

Copeland Joseph A,. Robb twp, Poseyville 

Copperman John, tailor, Mt. Vernon 

Corbin John, miller, (Ford & Corbin) New Harmony 

Cornelias Julius, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

(OMETT J W, clerk, Mt. Vernon 

Cornick George W, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Cornick Wm, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Corrasal Henry, farmer, Marrs twp, West Franklin 

Cosby L B, physician, Cynthiana 

Cotterell Robert, Lynn twp, Grafton 

Coukin G W, Bethel twp,. New Harmony 



l'<>SE\ COUNTY DIRECTORY. 153 

Coulter E M, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Court Henry, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Cowen Aaron, farmer, Lynn twp, Wadesville 

Cowen Wm, farmer, Lynn twp, New Harmony 

Cowgill Isaac, farmer, New Harmony 

Cowpen George E, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Cox Absalom, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

Cox Asbury, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Cox Benjamin, Justice of the Peace, Wadesville 

Cox Cynthia J, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Cox David C, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

Cox David G, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

Cox Elihu, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

Cox Elijah, jr, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

Cox Elijah, sr, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

Cox Eliza J (widow), Center twp, Wadesville 

Cox George W, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

Cox Harris, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Cox Howard, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

Cox James B, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Cox James H, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Cox John, farmer, Robb twp, Stewarisville 

Cox John C, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Cox John H, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Cox John Milton, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

Cox John P, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

Cox John Riley, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

Cox John T, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

Cox Jonathan, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Cox Joseph, farmer, Black twp, Wadesville 

Cox Joseph A, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

Cox Joseph L, farmor, Center twp, Wadesville 

Cox Joseph W sr, farmer. Center twp. Wadesville 

Cox Joshua, boarding & justice, Mr. Vernon 

Cox Lewis W. farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

Cox Mary L, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

Cox Nancy H (widow), Center twp, Wadesville 

Cox Robert W, farmer, Center twp, W t adesville 

Cox Romelia D, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

Cox Stinson, Assessor, Center twp, Wadesville 

Cox W I, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Cox Wm I jr, farmer, Center twp, Cynthiana 

Cox Wm Oscar, farmer, Wadesville 

Cozart Robert, farmer, Lynn twp, Solitude 



154 POSEY COUNTY DIRECTORY. 

Crabill N A, traveling agent, Mt. Vernon 

Crabtree James, farmer, Point tvvp, Mt. Vernon 

Craig D E, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

CRAI^ ELIZABETH MRS. (wife of Noble), Mt. Vernon 

Craig Noble, capitalist, Mt. Vernon 

Cralley A B, carpenter, Mt. Vernon 

(VALLEY JOSEPH K, blksmith & vvagonmaker Mt. Vernon 

CRALLEY O R, Assistant Postmaster Mt Vernon 

Cralley V K, carpenter, Mt. Vernon 

Crandall E J, grocer, Cynthiana 

Cravens Wm, laborer, Mt. Vernon 

Crawford Chas H, bank clerk, Mt. Vernon ' 

Creek Andrew J, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Creek Henry C. farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Creek Wm, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Creek Wm B. farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Creekmur John, farmer, Point twp. Mt. Vernon 

Creekmur Wm, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Crisswell Carson, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborns 

Critser N L, undertaker, New Harmony 

Cromwell Zachariah, Mt. Vernon 

CRONRACH MASTITJEL, Druggist, Mt. Vernon 

Cross Elijah, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Cross James, 'Joest & Cross) Wadesville 

Cross Thomas W, teacher, Poseyville 

Cross Wm, physician, New Harmony 

Grosser J E, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Crosser James R, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Crowley James, farmer. Bethel twp, New Harmony 

Crunk Abner, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vfrnon 

CRITXK ALEXANDER, sheriff Posey Co, Mt. Vernon 

Crunk Charles, farmer, Marrs twp, Mt. Vernon 

Crunk John B, farmer, Mt. Vernon 

Crunk John M, farmer, Marrs twp, Mt. Vernon 

Crunk Joseph L, farmer, Marrs twp, Mt. Vernon 

Crunk Richard, farmer, Marrs twp, Mt. Vernon 

Crunk Robert J, farmer, Marrs twp, Mt. Vernon 

Crunk Timothy B, farmer, Marrs twp, Mt. Vernon 

Crunk Wm D, farmer, Marrs twp, Mt. Vernon 

Crunk Wm S, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Cruse Frank, farmer Lynn twp, Solitude 

Crutchfield Richard, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Culiver Franklin, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Culiver Wm, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 



POSEY COUNTY DIRECTORY. 1 55 

Culiver Wm T, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Culley Alonzo, brickmason, Mi, Veknon 

Culley I) T, farmer, Black twp, Mr. Vernon 

Culley Felix, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Culley Joseph, harness & saddles, Cynthiana 

Culley Samuel B, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Culley Thomas F, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Gulp Conrad, blacksmith, Wadesville 

Culpepper Wm, blacksmith. New Harmony 

Culvert Nicholas (col), farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Cummings Thomas, Bethel twp, New Harmony 

Curnell H T, farmer, Lynn twp, Solitude 

Curnell James P, farmer, Lynn twp, Solitude 

Curnell Wm G, farmer, Lynn twp, Solitude 

Curtis Amos, farmer, Black twp, Mt. A^ernon 

Curtis F M, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

CURTIS 4 JKOKC; E<: W, Clerk Posey County, Mt. Vernon 

Curtis James B, farmer, Black twp, Mr. Vernon 

Curtis J E, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Curtis James K P, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Curtis M B, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Curtis Melvina, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Curtis Nancy L, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Curtis Noble, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Curtis Thomas C sr, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Curtis Thomas W. farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

CURTIS WJ?I B, JR, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Curtis Wm B sr, farmer, Black twp, Mr. Vernon 

Curtis Wm L, farmer. Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Cuyler James B, clerk, New Harmony 

D 

Dalzell James, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Daley D W, farmer, Bethel twp, New Harmony 

Daley John H, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Daley Thomas H, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Damm Christian, flour mill, Blairsville 

Damm E, saw mill, Blairsville 

Damm Henry, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Damm Jacob, farmer, Robinson twp, Blarsville 

DAMROtf I! CJ, hotel, Mt. Vernon 

Danberry George H, constable Lynn twp, New Harmony 



" EVANSVILLE ROUTE, " 




THE 



Louisville & Nashville 

RAILROAD, 

—IS THE— 

Shortest and Most Direct Route 



Beti 



St. Louis, Evansville, Nashville, 

And all cities of the 

North- West and South-Bast. 



Quick Time, 

Perfect Comfort 



Absolute Safety. 



For Time Tables, etc., address 
B. F. BLUE, C. P. ATMORE, 

§wt ^ioUt act, u,,,'{ 9mo,. cv iwUt ewt. 

St. Louis, Mo. Louisville, Ky. 



POSEY COUNTY DIRECTORY. 157 

Dandistel Charlotte, widow, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Daniels Wm H, farmer, Mt. Vernon 

Daniels Wm P, Justice of peace, Mt. Vernon 

Danolds Wm, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Darnell Alfred N, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Darnell Andrew J, farmer, Marrs twp. Caborn 

Darnell James J jr, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Darnell James J, sr, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborns 

Darnell Wm H, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborns 

Daub Henry, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Daub John H, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Daum Adam, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Dausman Henry, farmer, Marrs twp, West Franklin 

Dausman Phillip, farmer, Marrs twp, West Franklin 

Davenport Ivory, (col) farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

David Thomas R, farmer, Marrs twp, West Franklin 

Davis Chas M, blacksmith, Mt. Vernon 

Davis E F, Carpenter, New Harmony 

Davis Elijah, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Davis G P, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Davis Henry, (col) laborer, Mt. Vernon 

Davis Jerry, laborer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Davis John B, clerk, Mt. Vernon 

Davis John B, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Davis John M, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Davis John S, carpenter, Mt. Vernon 

Davis Joseph, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Davis J W, contractor, New Harmony 

Davis Thomas F, farmer, Robb twp, Stewartsville 

Davis T M, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Davis Wm H, farmer, Robb twp, Stewartsville 

DAVIS WM I, Superintendent City Schools, Mt. Vernon 

Davis Z S, carpenter, Mt. Vernon 

Dawes Elias, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Dawes Wm, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Daymond Erastus, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Dayton Chas F, laborer, Mt. Vernon 

Dean James, farmer, Robb twp, Stewartsville 

Debes George, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Debes Mathias, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Decker Emily (widow), Mt. Vernon 

Defur Elizabeth, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Defur James H, farmer, Robb twp, Stewartsville 

Defur Job, Constable Robb Township, Poseyville 



158 POSEY COUNTY DIRECTORY. 

Defur Leander, jr, farmer, Robb twp, Stewartsville 

Defur Leander sr, farmer, Robb twp, Stewartsville 

Defur Lewis, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Defur Salathiel, farmer, Robb twp, Stewartsville 

Defur Theophalus, undertaker, Wadesville 

Defur Wm L, farmer, Robb twp, Stewartsville 

Deig Elizabeth, postmistress, Marrs twp, St. Phillip 

Deig Frank, farmer, Marrs twp, West Franklin 

Deig John B Sr, farmer, Marrs twp, West Franklin 

Deig John S, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Deig John W, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Deig Joseph A, miller, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Deig Joseph jr, miller, Marrs twp, West Franklin 

Deig Joseph Sr, flouring mills, Marrs twp, West Franklin 

Deig Stephen A, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Deigstel August, Marrs twp, St. Phillip 

Deits John, farmer, Lynn twp, Solitude 

Deitz John, laborer, Mt. Vernon 

Deitz John, farmer, Marrs twp, West Franklin 

Delashmit David, farmer, Bethel twp, New Harmony 

Demaree Andrew (col), laborer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Demaree James H, laborer, Mt. Vernon 

Demaree James T, farmer, Robb twp, Stewartsville 

Demberger H, Postmaster, Stewartsville 

Denberger Martin, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Dennis Wm, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Denny Thomas, farmer, Bethel twp, New Harmony 

Denstorff Herman, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Denzer John, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Depoll John, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Depple Jacob, wagonmaker, Mt. Vernon 

Derrington Martha (widow), Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Derrington James T, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Devine Daniel, farmer, Lynn twp, Solitude 

Devine John L, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Dexheimer Henry, bakery and toys, Mt. Vernon 

Dichtel George, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Dickham Henry, jr, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Dickham Louis, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Dickhardt George, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Dickhardt Henry, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Dickhardt Peter, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Dierlam Caspar, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

DIETERLE JOIOf D, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 



POSEY COUNTY DIRECTORY. 1 59 

Dietrick Matthew, cooper, Mt. Vernon 

Diets George, farmer, Robb twp, Stewartsville 

Diets Henry, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Dietsel J H Rev, Catholic clergyman, St. Phillip 

Dill W H, hotel runner, Mt. Vernon 

Dillard Robert, laborer, Point twp, Mr. Vernon 

Dillinger Louis T, Mt. Vernon 

Dinger Frank, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Dippel Frank, farmer, Marrs twp, West Franklin 

Dippel Frank jr, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Dippel George, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Dippel John jr, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Dippel Peter, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Dirlam Henry, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Dismer E Mrs, millinery and dressmaking, Mt. Vernon 

Dixon Alvin H, farmer, Marrs twp, Mt. Vernon 

Dixon D W, farmer, Bethel twp, New Harmony 

Dixon John, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

DixoN John D, farmer, Bethel twp, New Harmony 

Dixon John L, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Dixon R F, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Dixon Richard, Mr. Vernon 

Dixon Roger S, farmer. Marrs twp, Mt. Vernon 

Dixon Samuel C, trustee Marrs twp, Mt. Vernon 

Dixon Wm, farmer, Marrs twp, West Franklin 

Dixon Wm F, farmer, Marrs twp, Mt. Vernon 

Doane Tunis C, clerk, Mt. Vernon 

Doll Adam, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Doll Jacob Jr, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Doll Jacob Sr, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Doll John, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Donaldson Charles E, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Donaldson David, farmer, Lynn twp, Grafton 

Donaldson Green, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Donaldson Henry, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Donaldson John, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Donaldson Susan, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Donner Frederick, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Donner Henry sr, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Dormer George, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Dormer Henry jr, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Dormer John, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Dorssey Pat, Section Boss L & L Ry Mt. Vernon 

Doss B H, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 



160 POSEY COUNTY DIREDTORY. 

Doss Ezra, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 
Doss Hannah, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 
Dougherty Henry C, fanner, Smith twp, Cynthiana 
Dougherty S P, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 
Dougherty Thomas, Apiarist, Marrs twp, Mt. Vernon 
Dougherty Wm E, farmer, Marrs twp, Mt. Vernon 
Dougherty W L, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 
Douglas Charles, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 
Dowell James M, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 
Downen Annie, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 
Downen D R, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 
Downen Ceorge M, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 
Downen George T Justice of the Peace Blairsville 
Downen George T Jr, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 
Downen John, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 
Downen Joseph, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 
Downen Josiah, farmer, Lynn twp, Wadesville 
Downen Robert, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 
Downen Thomas, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 
Downen Timothy, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 
Downen Wm, farmer, Mt. Vernon 
Downen Wm, Jr., farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 
Downey Geo M, hotel clerk, Mt. Vernon 
Downs Redding, constable Center twp, Wadesville 
Doyle John, Janitor Court House, Mt. Vernon 
Drake J H, farmer, Robb twp, Stewartsville 
Drake Tolbert C, farmer, Robb twp, Stewartsville 
Drake Wm A, farmer, Robb twp, Stewartsville 
Dransfield & Son, brick makers, New Harmonv 
Dransfield Arthur, miller, New Harmony 
Dransfield Charles, (Dransfield & son), New Harmony 
Dransfield Lemoin, (Dransfield & son), New Harmony 
Driggers E F, clerk, New Harmony 
Drinkwater Benjamin, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 
Drinkwater John, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 
Drinkwater Taylor, boarding house, New Harmony 
Droege August, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 
Droege Henry, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 
Droege Simon, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 
Duckworth Abijah, laborer, Mt. Vernon 
Duckworth David, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 
Duckworth Elisha, farmer, Black twp, Farmersville 
Duckworth Frank, farmer, Black twp, Farmersville 
Duckworth John, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 



POSEY COUNTY DIRECTORY. l6l 

Duckworth John W, farmer, Black twp, Mt, Vernon 

Duckworth Julia, boarding house, Mt. Vernon 

Duckworth Mary A, Lynn twp, Solitude 

Duckworth Wm, farmer, Black twp, Farmersville 

Duckworth Wm D, farmer, Center twp Wadesville 

Duckworth Wm G, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Duclos & Sons, lumber and staves, New Harmony 

Duclos Collin (Duclos & Sons), New Harmony 

Duclos George (Duclos & Sons), New Harmony 

Duclos J C, blacksmith, Stewartsville 

Duclos Victor C (Duclos & Sons), New Harmony 

Duclos Wm (Duclos & Sons). New Harmony 

Dudenhoefer Jacob, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Duley David S, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Duley John R, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Duley Wm H, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Dunbar Minerva, Lynn twp, Solitude 

Dunbar R C, farmer, Lynn twp, Solitude 

Duncan Campble, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Duncan Joseph S, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Duncan Marion, drayman, Mt. Vernon 

Dunkir James, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Dunlap James W, farmer, Robb twp, Stewartsville 

Dunn Gillison, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Dunn James W, hotel clerk, Mt. Vernon 

Dunn John W, engineer, Mt. Vernon 

Dunn John W sr, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Dunn Maggie, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Dunn Mary, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Dunn Robert K, farmer, Black twp, Farmersville 

Dunn Wesley, miller, Mt. Vernon 

Dunn Wm H, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Dunnigan Francis, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Dupee Wm B, farmer, Lynn twp, Grafton 

Durell Alva, farmer, Black twp, Mt Vernon 

Durley Wm, (col) laborer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Durlin Charles F, farmer, Robb twp, Stewartsville 

Durlin Frank, farmer, Lynn twp, Solitude 

Durlin George W, justice of the peace, Solitude 

E 

Eagle J T, tailor,, New Harmony 

Ease James, farmer, Bethel twp, New Harmony 

Easley Robert G, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 



I 62 POSEY COUNTY DIRECTORY. 

Eaton G W, farmer. Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Eaton James, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Eaton J M, physician, Cynthiana 

Eaton Robert, farmer, Robb twp, Stewartsville 

Eaton Wm T, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Echard E S, blacksmith, New Harmony 

Eckles John, farmer, Lynn twp, Solitude 

Eckles Joseph, farmer, Lynn twp, Solitude 

Eckles Wm, farmer, Lynn twp, Solitude 

Eckles Wm H, farmer, Lynn twp, Solitude 

Edmonds J F, farmer, Bethel twp, New Harmony 

Edmonds J W, farmer, Lynn twp, Solitude 

Edmonds Miles, farmer, Lynn twp, Solitude 

Edmonds Samuel, farmer, Lynn twp, Solitude 

EDSOJF WM P, attorney at law, Mt. Vernon 

Edwards Ephriam, farmer, Robb twp, Stewartsville 

Egler John, laborer. New Harmony 

Eglis Henry, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Eglis Peter, shoemaker, Caborn 

Eglis Phillip, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Ehrhardt Jacob, blacksmith, St. Phillip 

Eispenscheidt Peter, groceries and liquors, Mt. Vernon 

Eistenholdt Francis, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Eistenholdt Francis Jr, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Eells Edward M, farmer. Robb twp, Poseyville 

Elder Benjamin, farmer, Bethel twp, New Harmony 

Elder Susan, Bethel twp, New Harmony 

Elder Thomas B, farmer, Bethel twp, New Harmony 

Elleser Dorothea, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Elliott Charles D, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Elliott Cyrenus. jr, physician, Wadesville 

Elliott Cyrenus, sr, physician, Wadesville 

Elliott John B, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Elliott Mrs M A, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Ellis Elisha, farmer, Black twp, Farmersville 

Ellis James, laborer, New Harmony 

Ellis J D, farmer, Black twp, Farmersville 

Ellis Levy, miller, New Harmony 

Ellis Oliver, farmer, Robb twp, Stewartsville 

Ellis Wm, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Elsfelder Leonard, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Emge Emael, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Emmerson Jonathan, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Emrick Elizabeth, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 



POSEY COUNTY DIRECTORY. 1 63 

Emrich Wm, cooper, Blairsville 

Endicott A C, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Ehdicott Alexander, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Endicott George W, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Endicott G R, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Endicott James N, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Endicott J C, farmer, Smith twp, Cyntaiana 

Endicott John A, farmer, Lynn twp, Wadesville 

Endicott J R, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Endicott Martin, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Endicott M M, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Endicott Moses, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Endicott Orris S, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Endicott Patrick, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Endicott Polly A, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Endicott Raymond, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Endicott Samuel, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Endicott Thomas, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Endicott Wm, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Endicott Wm B, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Engbers Lambert, cooper, St. Wendel 

Engle David, farmer, Bethel twp, New Harmony 

Englehart John, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Engler George W, (Woody & Co.), Solitude 

Englers Lampert, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Erhardt Louisa, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Ernest Joseph, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Ernest Rachael (widow), Mt. Vernon 

Esche August, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Esche Frederick, farmer, Lynn twp, Solitude 

Esche Henry, Mrs, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Esche Louis, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Espenlaub John, jr, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Espenlaub John, sr, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Estes James, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Estes Jasper, farmer, Bethel twp. New Harmony 

Estes Thomas, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Erwin Alonzo, carpenter, Mt. Vernon 

Erwin Caleb, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

ERWIBf J>AVII>, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Erwin Hannah, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Erwin James M, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Erwin Samuel, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Erwin Wm, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 



V. C. FINCH & CO., 



DEALERS IN 



i^iFe^tote^t^lrieiliuFillipteieitp 

MT. VERNON, IND. 
JAS. & ROBT. MAGILL, 

MT. VERNON, IND., 

Blacksmiths & Machinists, 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

WAGOZTS, BIGGIES <& ROLLERS, 

HORSE SHOEING A SPECIALTY. 



Elwood Smith, 

Shi e<5^ fc^T^ <aTa> S^^S &]& ' -& 

OVER PARKE'S BANK, 

CMIain Street, H^T. -VEZROSrOilSr, lOSTD. 



Special attention given to Filling and Preserving Teeth ; also Crooked and Irregular 
Teeth permanently adjusted to their proper positions. 

HENRY WEISINGER, 

Dealer in 

©o||ii4^ Sltetci/foo S^ivziol (£>&$&$ 

AND CASKETS, 

Sout'n Sid.e ^o-artl^ Street, 

Between Store and Mill Sts., 



POSEY COUNTY DIRECTORY. 165 

Evans John, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Evertson Edgar S, miller, Mt. Vernon 

EVERTSOX EDGAR S, et al, flouring mills, Mt. Vernon 

Evertson John R, (Edgar S Evertson, et al), Mr. Vernon 

Evertson Louisa (widow), Mt. Vernon 

Evison Mary Ann (widow), Mt. Vernon 

Ewing P B, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

F 

Fairchild Edward, farmer, Robb twp, Stewartsville 
Fairchild Elam W, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 
Fairchild Frederick, farmer, Robb twp, Stewartsville 
Fairchild H L, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 
Fairchild John, farmer, Robb twp, Stewartsville 
Fairchild Wm, farmer, Robb twp, Stewartsville 
Fallen Mary (widow), Mt. Vernon 
Falter Edward, carpenter, Blairsville 
Farris Isaac, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 
Farris Wm C, Black twp, Mr. Vernon 
Faul Frederick, harnessmaker, Stewartsville 
Faul George W, trustee Robb twp, Stewartsville 
Faul Jacob, merchant, Robb twp, Stewartsville 
Faulkner Harry, trader, Mt. Vernon 
Fay August, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 
Felch Louis, farmer, New Harmony 
FEEDMiOftf GEORGE, barber, Mt. Vernon 
Feldspausch Antone, Mt. Vernon 
Fellemente Casper, tailor, Mt. Vernon 
Fellemente George, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 
Ferguson Asbury, farmer, New Harmony 
Ferguson, James F, teacher, Mt. Vernon 
Ferree George A, farmer, Lynn twp, Solitude 
Fessinger John, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 
Fetbush, Conrad, farmer, Marrs twp, West Franklin 
Ficks Jacob, deliveryman, Mt. Vernon 
Fifer Wm J, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 
Fillingim Enoch, restaurant, New Harmony 
Fillingim Graehus, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 
Fillingim John, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 
Fillingim Sophia, Harmony twp, New Harmony 
Finch John, confectionery, Mt. Vernon 
Finch J M, farmer, Black twp, Farmersville 



1 66 POSEY COUNTY DIRECTORY. 

FOTCM V€& CO, hardware and agricultural implements, Mt. 

Vernon 
Finch Wm H, farmer, Black twp, Farmersville 
Fink Charles, Bethel twp, New Harmony 
Finley Chas D, laborer, New Harmony 
Finnell Ben W, Constable Black Township, Mt. Vernon 
Finnell James R, farmer, Lynn twp, Solitude 
Finnell John A, farmer, Lynn twp, Solitude 
Finnell Wm A, farmer, Lynn twp, Solitude 
Finney Daniel, (col) hotel porter, Mt. Vernon 
Fisher Andrew, blacksmith, Wadesville 
Fisher Andrew Jr, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 
Fisher Frederick, farmer, Marrs twp, West Franklin 
Fisher Frederick Jr, farmer, Marrs twp, West Franklin 
FISHER GEORGE W, postmaster, Cynthiana 
Fisher Jacob, Bethel twp, New Harmony 
Fisher J E, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 
Fisher John, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 
Fisher John, farmer, Marrs twp, West Franklin 
Fisher John C, farmer, Marrs twp, West Franklin 
Fisher John F, farmer, Robb twp, Stewartsville 
Fisher L A, farmer, Robb twp, Stewartsville 
Fisher Oliver, New Harmony 
Fisher Valentine, jr, farmer, Mt. Vernon 
Fisher Valentine, sr, farmer, Marrs twp, St. Phillip 
Fisher Wm, Bethel twp, New Harmony 

Fitton Frank O, real estate (Owen & Fitton), New Harmony 
Fitzgerald Daniel, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 
Fitzgerald John S, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 
Fitzgerald Bouis, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 
Fitzgerald Morrison, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 
Fitzsimmons David, laborer, New Harmony 
Fleck James, farmer. Harmony twp. New Harmony 
Fleharty Joel, farmer, Bethel twp, New Harmony 
Fletchall Amariah, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 
Fletchall Cynthia, Robb twp, Poseyville 
Fletchall Isaiah, farmer, Robb twp, Stewartsville 
Florida George, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 
Floyd Perry, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 
FLOYD WJI E, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 
Flucks Charles, physician, St. Wendel 
Flucks Emil, Robinson twp, St. Wendel 
FOCjJAS A C, mfr. cigars and tobacco, Mt. Vernon 
Folan James, Bethel twp, New HARMONy 



POSEY COUNTY DIRECTORY'. 1 67 

Folz George, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Folz Henry, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Folz John, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Folz John, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Folz John Jr, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Folz Peter, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Folz Stephen, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Forcum Henry M, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

Forcum Jonathan, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Forcum Win, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

Forcum W T, laborer, New Harmony 

Ford Chas H, farmer, New Harmony 

Ford George, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Ford J W, laborer, New Harmony 

Ford Morris, (Ford, Owen & Co), New Harmony 

Ford, Owen & Co, General store, New Harmony 

Ford Richard, speculator, New Harmony 

Ford Thomas, Assessor Harmony Township, New Harmony 

Ford Thomas S, billiards and cigars, New Harmony 

Ford William (Ford, Owen & Co), New Harmony 

Ford Wm J, machine agent, New Harmony 

Ford Wm P, dentist, New Harmony 

Forest W A, engineer, New Harmony 

Forthman George, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

FOSHEE CHARLES, contractor and brickmaker, Mt. Vernon 

Foshee Wm R, brickmason, Mt. Vernon 

Foster Alfred, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Foster Thomas, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Fowler George W, farmer, Lynn twp, Solitude 

Fox Frank, saloon, Blairsville 

Fox G L, saloon, Wadesville 

Fox John F, blacksmith, Caborn 

Fox John J, farmer, Marrs twp, West Franklin 

Fox Joseph blacksmith Blairsville 

Fox Joseph H, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

Fox Joseph Sr, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Franck George H, bakery, Mt. Vernon 

Frank Noah, hotel, New Harmony 

Franzmann Wm, bootmaker New Harmony 

Freeman Flizabeth, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

FREEIIM HOLHM, (Wolf, Freeman & Pfeffer), Mt. Vernon 

Freeman James, farmer. Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Freeman Jessie, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Frehlinghison Benjamin, farmer, Marrs twp, West Franklin 



l68 POSEY COUNTY DIREDTORY. 

Freind Adam, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

French Clark C, farmer, Lynn twp, Solitude 

French George S, farmer. Lynn twp, Graft* >n 

French Gustave, farmer, Lynn twp, Solitude 

French James T, farmer, Lynn twp, Grafton 

French James W, farmer, Lynn twp, Solitude 

French John, farmer, Lynn twp, Grafton 

FRENCH L. C. farmer. Lynn twp. Solitude 

French Ralph, farmer, Lynn twp, Grafton 

French Sarah (widow), Lynn twp, Grafton 

French Thomas, farmer, Lynn twp, Grafton 

French Thomas J, farmer, Lynn twp, Mr. Vernon 

French Wm H, farmer, Lynn twp, Grafton 

Fretageot A H, (A H Fretageot & Bro), New Haramw 

Fretageot A H & Bro, general store, New Harmony 

Fretageot Oliver, (A H Fretageot & Bro), 

Freund Sebastian, farmer, Black twp. Mt. Vernon 

Frey Ludwig, clerk, Mr. Vernon 

Frick Frederick, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsvtlle 

Frick George, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsvii.i.e 

Frick John, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Frick Louis, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

Frick Wm, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Friedley George E, Black twp, Mr. Vernon 

FRIEULtfOHAIJSEtf AtfTOJFE, saloon, Mr. Vernon 

Frielinghausen Frank, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Frielinghausen Henry, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Frielinghausen Joseph, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Frink Louis, carpenter, Wadesville 

Fritz Jacob, Mr. Vernon 

FFEULI^Cr V E, merchant tailor, Mt. Vernon 

Fuelling J L, tinner, Mt. Vernon 

FVHRER & BOYCE, grain, Mt. Vernon 

Fuhrer Charles, laborer, Mt. Vernon 

Fuhrer Charles W, dairyman, Mt. Vernon 

Fuhrer Columbus, farmer, Black twp, Mr. Vernon 

Fuhrer Frank, laborer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Fuhrer Gregory, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Fuhrer John, farmer, Black twp, Mr. Vernon 

Fuhrer Leon, musician, Mt. Vernon 

Fuhrer W C, ( Fuhrer & Boyce, Mt. Vernon 

Fulton Edward, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Funston Henry, farmer, Robb twp, Posey ville 



-OSEY COUNTY DIRF.CTORY. 1 69 



G 



Gabel Andrew, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Gabel Franzicka, Robinson twp. Blairsville 

Galbert Thomas J, farmer, Bethel twp, New Harmony 

Gale John, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Gale Zimariah, farmer, Black twp, Mr. Vernon 

Galligar Aaron B, farmer, Lynn twp, Solitude 

Galligar Wra F, farmer, Lynn twp, Wadesville 

Ganoe George W, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Gardiner J G Mrs, (widow), Mt. Vernon 

Gardiner John B, cash ist National Bank, Mt. Vernon 

Gardiner Samuel, farmer, Lynn twp, Poseyville 

Gardiner Wra, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Garrett Andrew, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Garrett Henry P, laborer, New Harmony 

Garrett Jordan, farmer, Bethel twp, Griffin 

Garris Clark, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

Garris F S, farmer, Bethel twp, New Harmony 

Garris John, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

Garris Joseph, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

Garris Wm, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Garrison C E, farmer, Smith twp, CynthiAna 

Garrison S W P, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Garten- Alfred H, farmer, Robb twp, New Harmony 

Gaston O C, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Gastenfelt Henrika, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Gastenfelt Henry, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Gates Allen, carpenter, Mt. Vernon 

Gatewood Stephen, farmer, Robb twp, Stewartsville 

Gebauer Charles, Mt. Vernon 

Geiss Christian, shoemaker, Blairsville 

Geiss John, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

OEISS W C, confectionery Mt. Vernon 

Gempler Amand, wagonmaker. Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Gempler Frederick, wagonmaker, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Gempler John, wagonmaker, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Center Peter, farmer, Marrs twp, WaST Franklin 

CJEKTRY BROS, Livery stable New Harmony 

Gentry Edward, (Gentry Bros), New Harmony 

Gentry Pleasant, stock dealer, New Harmony 

Gentry Reese, (Gentry Bros) New Harmony 

George Jesse, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 



170 POSEY COUNTY DIRECTORY. 

Gerding August, farmer, Point tvvp, Mt. Vernon 

Gerding Charles, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Gerth Win, carpenter, Mt. Vernon 

Gerton Louis, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Gerwig Joseph, drayman. Mt. Vernon 

Gettings Charles C, farmer, Lynn twp, Grafton 

Gibson Charles, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Gibson J H, farmer, Smith tvvp, Cynthiana 

Gibson J N, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Giesken Herman, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Gilbert Wm, farmer, Bethel twp, New Harmony 

Giles Washington, farmer, Lynn twp, New Harmony 

Giles Wm M, fanner, Harmony twp. New Harmony 

trlLL CLAY, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Gill Filmore, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Gill H A, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Gill Isaac N, plasterer, Mt. Vernon 

Gill John, plasterer, Mt. Vernon 

Gill John S, sr, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Gill John T, farmer, Lynn twp, Grafton 

Gill Nancy, Lynn twp, Grafton 

GILL. QLIYC Y A, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Gill Samuel, jr, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

<J 11,1, SAMUEL, SR, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Gilleon John, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Gilleon Victor, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon , 

Gillespie, Patrick farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Gillman S J, meatmarket, Mt. Vernon 

Gilly James, farmer, Lynn twp, Solitude 

Gimlich Henry, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Girard Joseph, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Givens Charles, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Givens E, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Givens George W, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Givens Gilbert, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Givens W B, farmer, Lynn twp, Grafton 

Glaser George, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Glasier Nicholas, butcher, Cynthiana 

Glass Charles A, baker, Mt. Vernon 

Goad Gabriel, farmer, Bethel twp, Griffin 

Goad Thomas, farmer, Lynn twp, Grafton 

Goad W D, farmer, Lynn twp, Grafton 

Goad Wm, farmer, Lynn twp, Grafton 

Goebel Henry, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 



POSEY COUNTY DIRECTORY. 171 

Goedde Anton, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Goedde Frank, farmer, Robinson twp. Blairsville 

Goedde Henry, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Goerlich Simon, saloon, New Harmony 

Goetz Andrew, farmer, Marrs twp, West Franklin 

Goins John F, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Goldsmith W N, policeman, Mt. Vernon 

Goodman John L, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Goods Jacob, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

Goodwin E J, farmer, Lynn twp, New Harmony 

Gordon Theodore farmer, Bethel twp, New Harmony 

Goslee James S, Postmaster Poseyville 

Goss Andrew, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Goss Henry D, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

OOSS ROBERT B, Trustee Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Goss Theodore, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Gosmann Victor jr, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Gossman Victor sr, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Gotwald G A, Dhysician, New Harmony 

GOUDY ROBERT L,, carpenter, Mt. Vernon 

Grabert Christian, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Grabert Frederick, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Grabert Michael, (Hoehn & Grabert), Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Grable Joseph, farmer, Lynn twp, Solitude 

Graff Christian, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Graff Frederick, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Graham Benjamin, farmer, Bethel twp, New Harmony 

Graham George, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Graham John, laborer, New Harmony 

Graham John E, farmer, Bethel twp, Griffin 

Grant Andrew J, farmer, Robb twp, Stewartsville 

Graul Charlotte, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Graul Frederick, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Graul J, carpenter, Blairsville 

Graul John M, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Graulich Caspar, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Graulich Henry, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Graulich John, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Greathouse Aaron, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

GREATHOUSE DAVID H, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Greathouse Frank M, farmer, Lynn twp, Grafton 

Greathonse George S, farmer, Point twp, Mt.. Vernon 

Greathouse James M, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Greathouse L D, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 



Wm. M. McArthur & Co., 



DEALERS IN 



DRUGS, MEDICINES, CHEMICALS, 

Oils, Varnishes, Glass, Paints, Putty, 

-AND- 

PATENT MEDICINES. 

MT. VERNON, IND. 

PRESCRIPTIONS CAREFULLY COMPOUNDED. 



1845 1882 

A. C. McCallister & Son, 



DEALERS IN 



Staple and Fancy Dry Goods, 
GROCERIES, 

Hardware, Queensware, Boots, Shoes, Hats, Caps, Country Produce &c, 
2>T©. 22 IIvTa-in Street, 

MT. VERNON, INP, 



POSEY COUNTY DIRECTORY. 1 73 

GREATHOUSE LEWIS C, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

GREATHOISE SAMPSON, farmer, Mt. Vernon 

Greathouse Wm, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Grebe Ferdinand, farmer, Marrs twp, West Franklin 

Green Amanda, Point twp, Mt! Vernon 

GKEEJf & HlTCHESOtf, (George S Green and Philo A 

Hutcheson) Abstractors and conveyancers, Mt. Vernon. 
GREEtf CHARLES R, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 
Green Edwin T, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 
GREEX GEORGE S, deputy Co Auditor, Mt. Vernon 
Green Henry (col), farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 
Green James, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 
Green Thomas M, farmer Marrs twp, Caborn 
Green Thomas S, Justice of the Peace Caborn, 
Green Wm R, barkeeper, New Harmony 
Greenwald Louis, barkeeper, New Harmony 
Gregory Alvis, farmer, Lynn twp, Solitude 
Gregory & Son, Livery stable, Mt. Vernon 
Gregory Henry T, Postmaster, Farmersville 
Gregory James, physician, Black twp, Farmersville 
Gregory John, (Gregory & Son) Mt. Vernon 
Gregory Joseo, (Gregory & Son), Mt. Vernon 
Gregory Milton, farmer, Black twp, Farmersville 
Gregory Nathaniel, farmer, Black twp, Farmersville 
Gregory Wm, farmer, Black twp, Farmersville 
Gregory Young (col), laborer, Mt. Vernon 
Gren John, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 
Gries Adam, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 
Gries Charles, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 
Gries Conrad, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 
Gries Jacob, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 
Griffin Joseph S, restaurant, Mt. Vernon 
Griffin Samuel, postmaster, Bethel twp, Griffin 
Grigsby Arthur, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 
Grigsby G W, farmer, Bethel twp, Griffin 
Grigsby James, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 
Grigsby John, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 
Grigsby John H, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 
Grigsby Thomas J, farmer, Bethel twp, New Harmony 
Grim John, boots and shoes, Poseyville 
Gronemeier August, blacksmith, Mt. Vernon 
GRONEMEIER CHARLES, bootmaker, Mt. Vernon 
Gronemeier Henry, cooper, Mt. Vernon 
GRONEMEIER SOION, stoves and tinware, Mt. Vernon 



174 POSEY COUNTY DIRECTORY. 

Gross Martin B, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Grotius Charles, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Grossman Andrew, farmer, Marrs twp, West Franklin 

Grossman Barbara, farmer, Marrs twp, West Franklin 

Grossman John J, farmer, Marrs twp, West Franklin 

Grossman Louis, farmer, Marrs twp, West Franklin 

Grossman Phillip, farmer, Marrs twp, West Franklin 

Groves G W, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Groves Henry, laborer, Mt. Vernon 

Groves Isaac, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Grubbs John A, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Grubbs John C, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Guilliams Charles, farmer, Lynn twp, Grafton 

Gumberts A R, physician, St. Wendel 

Gurtin John, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Gwaltney Andrew, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Gualtney Benjamin Jr, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

Gwaltney Elizabeth, Center twp, Wadesville 

Gwaltney James H, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Gwaltney J M, farmer, Robb twp, Stewartsville 

Gwaltney Matilda, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Gwaltney Sarah, Smith twp, Cynthiana 



H 



Haag Martin, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 
Haas Caroline, (widow) Mt. Vernon 
Haas Charles, farmer, Mt. Vernon 
Haas Florian, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 
Haas John, farmer, Mt. Vernon 

Hackett Ephraim, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 
Hagemann Wm, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 
Hagerman F H, farmer, Kentucky, Mt. Vernon 
Hahn Adam, farmer, Marrs twp, West Franklin 
Hahn Adam C, farmer, Marrs twp, West Franklin 
Hahn Conrad, farmer, Marrs twp, West Franklin 
Hahn George, farmer, Marrs twp, West Franklin 
Hahn Henry, farmer, Marrs twp, West Franklin 
Hahn Henry C, farmer, Marrs twp, West Franklin 
Hahn John A, farmer, Marrs twp, West Franklin 
Hahn John C, farmer, Marrs twp, West Franklin 
Hahn Magdalena, Marrs twp, West Franklin 
Hahn Nicholas, farmer, Marrs twp, West Franklin 



POSEY COUNTY DIRECTORY. 1 75 

Hahn Wm, farmer, Robinson twp, Parker's 

Hain Henry, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Haines James D, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

Haines John W, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

Haines W M, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Hainley Peter, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Hainley George, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Hale Wm, farmer, Bethel twp, New Harmony 

Haley Robert H, blacksmith, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Hall Joseph, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Hall Marshall, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Hall Wm J, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Hall Wm L, farmer, Lynn twp, Solitude 

Hamil John, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Hamilton Joshua, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Hamilton Louis, wagonmaker, New Harmony 

Hamlin George, farmer, Lynn twp, Grafton 

Hancock Benjamin, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Hancock Dicy J, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

Hancock Enoch, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Hancock Frank, speculator, Mt. Vernon 

Hancock John F, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Hancock J D, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Hancock Jordon, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Hancock Samuel, farmer. Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Hancock Wm, farmer, Black twp, Farmersville 

Hancock W R, farmer, Mt. Vernon 

II AMil\N C E, grocer, Mt. Vernon 

Hanks James, New Harmony 

Hanshaw John H, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Hanshaw Mary, (widow) Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Hanson James, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Happy Henry E, farmer, Bethel twp, New Harmony 

Harbersan Hugh, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Hardy Alfred, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Hardy Elial, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Hardy Henry, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Hardy Richard, farmer, Harmonv twp, New Harmony 

HARLAII A ED, grocer, Mt. Vernon 

Harlam & Son, clothiers, Mt. Vernon 

Harlam Jacob (Harlam & Son), Mt. Vernon 

Harlam Michael (Harlam & Son), Mt. Vernon 

Hargraves James, laborer, New Harmony 

Harp Eli, farmer, Marrs twp, West Franklin 



176 POSEY COUNTY DIREDTORY. 

Harp John T, farmer, Marrs twp, West Franklin 

Harp S E, clerk, Mt. Vernon 

Harp Thomas, (Marion & Harp), Mt. Vernon 

Harp W W, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Harper Ida Miss, teacher, Mt. Vernon 

Harper John, physician, Mt. Vernon 

Harris George T, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Harris James, farmer, Lynn twp, Solitude 

Harris John L, farmer, Bethel twp. Griffin 

Harris Thomas P, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Harrison Asa C, farmer, Marrs twp, West Franklin 

Harrison David, farmer, Marrs twp, West Franklin 

Harrison Melvina, Marrs twp, West Franklin 

Harshburger Kate (widow), Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Harth Caspar, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Hartman John A, farmer, Marrs twp, West Franklin 

Hartman Joseph Sr, farmer, Marrs twp, West Franklin 

Hartman Nicholas, farmer, Marrs twp, West Franklin 

Hartman Wm, boot and shoemaker, New Harmony 

HARTUXG EEVI «& XATHAff, grocers, Mt. Vernon 

Hary Jacob, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Haste John, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

HASTINGS TMOJIAS, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Hastings Wm, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Hattich Adam, marble works, Mt. Vernon 

Hattich Lucas, Mt. Vernon 

Hauck Lana, (widow). Robinson twp, Wadesville 

Hauer John, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Hausman Henry, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Haustenberg Charles, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Haustenberg Wm, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Hawkins R G, teamster, New Harmony 

Hayden Henry, (Hayden &: Johnson), New Harmony 

Hayden & Johnson, Agricultural Implts, New Harmony 

Hayes Anna (widow,), Center twp, Wadesville 

Hayes Charles F, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

HAYES ED S, City Marshal, Mt. Vernon 

Haynes, saw mill, Wadesville 

Haynes George, farmer, Marrs twp, West Franklin 
Haynes James M, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 
Haynes James T, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 
Haynes James W, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 
Haynes J B, physician, Mt. Vernon 
Haynes John T, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 



POSEY COUNTY DIRECTORY. 1 77 

Haynes Robert A, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Hays Wm, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Haywood Wm T, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Heck Joseph H, farmer, Harmony twp, Mt. Vernon 

Heck M, Rev, clergyman (Catholic), St. Wendel 

Heckman Jacob, sr, farmer, Robb twp, PoseyvillE 

Hedge James, farmer, Bethel twp, New Harmony 

Heil George, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Heil John, farmer, Black twp, Caborn 

Heil Michael, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Heinmueller John, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Heiser Christian, Mt. Vernon 

Heitzman Jacob, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Helfry Peter, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Hellenberg Henry, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Helmer Herman, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Helment Lawrence, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Helmick Allen C, carpenter, New Harmony 

Helzard Samuel, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Hembes Caroline, (widow), Mt. Vernon 

Hemmer E W, Mt. Vernon 

HEHPFLDVG LAWRENCE, meat market, Mt. Vernon 

Hempke Andrew, farmer, Marrs twp, West Franklin 

Henderson J B, physician, St. Phillip 

Henderson Joseph M, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Henderson S C, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Hendricks Alonzo, carpenter. Mt. Vernon 

Hendricks Frederick A, farmer, Marrs twp, West Franklin 

Hendricks Wm, County Coroner, Mt. Vernon 

Hendrickson Wm, farmer, Lynn twp, Solitude 

Heninger Wm, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

HEiRICM GEORGE, barber furnishing goods, cigars and 

tobacco, Mt. Vernon 
Hensley Edward, farmer, Bethel twp, New Harmony 
Henson J E, blacksmith, Smith twp, Cynthiana 
Henson Robert, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 
Herald R J, New Harmony 
Herbert Albert, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 
Herbert Catherine, farmer, Robinson twp, BlarsvillE ' 
Herbert Daniel, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 
Herbert John, farmer, Robinson twp, Parker 
Herbert Valentine, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 
Hermann John, Justice of the Peace, Wadesville 
Herring Alexander, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 



178 POSEY COUNTY DIRECTORY. 

Herring Elisha, farmer, Bethel twp, New Harmony 

Herring Wilson, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Herrenbrunk Henry, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Herrenbrunk Henry, jr, farmer, Robinson twp, Parker's 

Herrman John, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

Hershman Matilda (widow), Black twp, Mi. Vernon 

Hessenheour George, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Heuring Charles A, farmer, Robb twp, Stewartsville 

Heuring Jacob F, New Harmony 

Heuring John W, miller, New Harmony 

Heuring Wm, clerk, Mt. Vernon 

Heyns Wm, saloon, St. Wendel 

Hiatt & Owen, lumber dealers, New Harmony 

Hiatt Joel (Hiatt & Owen), New Harmony 

Hickman Jacob Jr, farmer, Robb twp, Stewartsville 

Hicks C, physician, Caborn 

Hicks Cadawalader, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Hiersten Adam, laborer, Mt. Vernon 

Higginbotham Aaron, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Highlander Henry, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

II 14. mi i > EDWARD E, farmer, Lynn twp, Solitude 

Highman George W, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Highman Jane, (widow) Lynn twp, Solltude 

HIOIOIA1T ROBERT W, farmer, Lynn twp, Solitude 

Hildinger Casper, Justice, Blairsville 

Hildinger Catherine, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Hill Albert, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Hill L H, Justice of the Peace, Poseyville 

Hill Stephen, farmer, Marrs twp, West Franklin 

Hindman John, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Hines A J, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Hines Elizabeth, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Hinch Frank, farmer, Point twp, Hovey 

Hinch John D, boots & shoes, Mt. Vernon 

Hinch Wm S, barber, Mt. Vernon 

Hinken Girard, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Hinkley S E, New Harmony 

Hinnenkemp John H, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Hironimus John, blacksmith, Mt. Vernon 

Hironimous Phillip jr, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Hironimous Phillip sr, farmer, Black tw, Mt. Vernon 

Hirschelmann Andrew, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Hirschelmann Henry, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Hisch Anton, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 



POSEY COUNTY DIRECTORY. 1 79 

Hisch Catherine, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Hisch John, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Hobby Hartwell, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Hobeter Wm, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Hobson Jessie T, New Harmony 

Hockman Thomas, farmer, Bethel twp, New Harmony 

Hodkins Tohn, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

HOEM & GRABERT, groceries, Mt. Vernon 

Hoehn Andrew, farmer, Lynn twp, Solitude 

Hoehn George L, Mt. Vernon 

Hoehn Louis (Hoehn & Grabert), Mt. Vernon 

HOEHX THEODORE, Mt. Vernon 

Hoell George, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Hoenert Frederick, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Hoerer Gottlieb, farmer, Robinson twp, Parkers 

Hoffman John, Cooper, Mt. Vernon 

Hoffman Nicholas, Cooper, Mt. Vernon 

Hofmann Catherine, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Hoftrieten Adam, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Hoftrieten John, Jr., farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Hofrieten John, Sr., farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Hofreiter Andrew, wagon maker, New Harmony 

Hofreiter Joseph, New Harmony 

Hogan Michael, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Hoge Ernest, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Hogue Wm. laborer, Mt. Vernon 

Holden Sidney, farmer, Lynn twp, Solitude 

Holland Anthony, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Holland George, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Holland Hiram, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Holland Margaret, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Holland Markham, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Holland Nathan, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Holleman A J, farmer. Black twp, Farmersville 

HOLLEHAX JOSIAH, farmer, Black twp, Farmersville 

Holleman R W, farmer, Black twp, Farmersville 

Holleman V, farmer, Bethel New Harmony 

Holler Andrew J, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Hollingsworth Thomas, carpenter, Black twp, Farmersville 

Holmes George, farmer, Bethel twp, New Harmony 

Holt Cortney, Mt. Vernon 

Holt James, Mt. Vernon 

Holton Wm H, physician, New Harmony 

Holtzgrebe Henry, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 



JOEC1T T^T-A-X-Z, 

Manufacturer of and Dealer in 
:L/E_A.i:LT STREET, Second door South, of Post Office, 



Keeps on hand and constantly receives, the best assorted stock of Boots and Shoes in 
Posey County, or will make to order any kind desired on short notice. CHEAP FOR CASH. 
Everybody can be satisfied in the Boot and Shoe line. 



E. E. Thomas, Wm. Topper. 

THOMAS <& TOPPER, 

Dealers in 

EQUALITY, CANNEL, ANTHRACITE AND 

Office : 35T. "W. Oor. 2*dill and Second Streets, 

3UET- "VEIRlSrOIST, I3STID. 



JOHN" WARDELMAITIT, 

STOVES AND TINWARE, 

Prompt attention given to all orders for 

TIN ROOFING AND GUTTERING, 

Main Street, Bet. Tavern and Mill Sts., 

"SCHNEIDER & CO, 

—DEALERS IN— 

8TAPU& AND FANCY GROCERIES, 

MT. VERITOIT, ZND. 



POSEY COUNTY DIRECTORY. ii 

HOI/TZH II1R J PETER, shoemaker, Mr. Vernon 

HOMER EDWARD, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Hoofman Martin sr, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Hook Phillip, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

Hook Henry, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

Hook John, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

Hoover Frederick, farmer, Bethel twp, New Harmony 

Hopkins Daniel, farmer, Marrs twp, West Franklin 

Hordcopf Bernhardt, farmer, Center twb. Wadesville 

Horstmann Henry, farmer, Robinson twp, St. Wendel 

Horton Charles, laborer, New Harmony 

Horton George, laborer, New Harmony 

Hosea George J, brickmason, Mt. Vernon 

Hottel Henry, farmer. Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Houser Mrs John, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Housman Adam, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Housman Peter, farmer, Marrs twp, West Franklin 

Housman Phillip, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Housman Charles, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Houston } C, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

HOVE1 AEVItf P, attorney at law, Mt. Vernon 

HOVEY CHARLES J, lumber dealer, Mt. Vernon 

Howard Frank, farmer, Point twp, Hovey 

Howard James W, Mt. Vernon 

Howard Paul, printer, Mt. Vernon 

Howard Silas, teacher, Mt. Vernon 

Huber C F, farmer, Black twp, Caborn 

Huber George, jr, farmer, Robinson twp, St. Phillip 

Huber Jacob, farmer, Robinson twp, St. Phillip 

Huber John, farmer, Black twp, Caborn 

Huber John L, farmer, Black twp, Caborn 

Huber Wm, farmer, Robinson twp, St. Phillip 

Hubner Elizabeth, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Hubner George, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Hubner L M, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Hubner Wm W, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

HITDJTITT THEODORE, hominy mills, Mt. Vernon 

Hudson James, Mt. Vernon 

Hudson James M, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Hudson J W, Mt. Vernon 

Hudson Robert, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Hudson W W, farmer, Robb twp, Stewartsville 

Hudspeth J W, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Huff George, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 



1 82 POSEY COUNTY DIRECTORY. 

Huff John, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Huff John A, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Hume Elizabeth, farmer, Robb twp. Stewartsville 

Hume W W, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Hume Wm, jr, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Hummel Jacob, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Hungate Win, farmer, Bethel twp, New Harmony 

Hungate Zachariah, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Hunsdon Henry, merchant, New Harmony 

Huff Wm, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Hughes Adam, (col) laborer, Mr. Vernon 

Hugo Jenkin T, jr, laborer, New Harmony 

Hugo Jenkin T sr, undertaker Mew Harmony 

Hugo John K, laborer, New Harmony 

Hugo John R, carpenter, New Harmony 

Hults E A, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Hunter Alvin, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

Hunter Charles W, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Hunter F P, farmer, Black twp, New Harmony 

Hunter James, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Hunter James R jr, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Hunter Robt K, capitalist Mt. Vernon 

Hunter Wm W, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Hurd J M, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Hurst John, farmer, Lynn twp, Solitude 

Hurst Leonard E, farmer, Lynn twp, Solitude 

Hury Wm, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Husband George, speculator, New Harmony 

Husband H C, saddler, New Harmony 

Husband Henry, laborer, New Harmony 

Husband James, harness and saddles, New Harmony 

Husband Julia, (widow) Mt. Vernon 

Husker John, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Huston F M, farmer, Lynn twp, Solitude 

HITTCfiUSSOJf PmrXO A, County Recorder, Mt. Vernon 

HUTCHINSON ALEX, gen'l insurance agt, Mt. Vernon 

Hyne George, farmer, Robb twp, Stewartsville 

Hyne George R, farmer, Robb twp, Stewartsville 

Hyne Henry C. farmer, Robb twp, Stewartsville 

Hyne James M, farmer, Robb twp, Stewartsville 

Hyne Jasper, farmer, Robb twp, Stewartsville 

Hyne J B, stock dealer, Stewartsville 

Hyne John, farmer, Robb twp, Stewartsville 

Hyne Lewis farmer, Robb twp, Stewartsville 



POSEY COUNTY DIRECTORY. 1 83 



Hyne Silas, farmer, Robb tvvp, Stewartsville 
Hyne Thomas J, farmer, Robb twp, Stewartsville 



Imboden Peter, shoemaker, Mt. Vernon 
Imhof Daniel, Mt. Vernon 
Ingles A J, farmer, Lynn twp, Solitude 
Ingles Charles, farmer, Black twp, Farmersville 
Ingles David, farmer, Black twp, Farmersville 
Ireland Miltiades, laborer, New Harmony 
Irwin Wm F, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 
Isaacs Samuel, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 
Isham David, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 
Isham Russel, steamboatman, Mt. Vernon 



Jacobi Frank, Robinson twp, St. Wendel 
Jacobs George, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 
Jackson Byron, Harmony twp, New Harmony 
Jackson David, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 
Jackson Isham, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 
Jackson Jonathan P, carpenter, New Harmony 
Jackson Walter, carpenter, New Harmony 
Jackson Walter, butcher, New Harmony 
Jackson Walter S, Attorney at law, Mt. Vernon 
Jackson Wm, Black twp, Caborn 
James C F, painter, New Harmony 
James Douglas, laborer, New Harmony 
James Jones, farmer, Robb twp, Stewarstville 
James Robert R, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 
James Thomas R, farmer, Lynn twp, Grafton 
Jaquess Horace, grain, Poseyville 
Jaquess S C, merchant, Poseyville 
Jaquess Harry E, Robb twp, Poseyville 
Jaquess H G, Robb twp, Poseyville 
Jaquess J G, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 
Jaquess Joshua, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 
Jaquess S S, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 
Jaquess Thomas C, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 
Jaquess T J, Robb twp, Poseyville 



I 84 POSEY COUNTY DIREDTORY. 

J i SSOI>NK I EOFIS, clothing and gen'l mdse Mt. Vernon 

Jarodski Max, clerk, Mt. Vernon 

Jarred John, farmer, Point twp, Mr. Vernon 

Jeffries James C, teacher, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

JEFFRIES .IONIUM, farmer, Black twp, Mr. Vkrnon 

Jeffries Robert F, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Jeffries Wm S, farmer. Point twp, Mr. Vernon 

Jehl Joseph, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Jenkins George H, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vf.rxon 

Jenkins John W, Collector, Mt. Vernon 

Jenkins Wm D, painter, Mt. Vernon 

Jenkins W S, farmer, Mt. Vernon 

Jenner Adam, Mt. Vernon 

Joest & Cross, gen'l store, Wadesville 

Joest Elizabeth, Center twp, Wadesville 

Joest Joseph, Center twp, Wadesville 

JOEST JJICHOEAS, County Treasurer, Mt. Vernon 

Johans Herman, Mt. Vernon 

Johnson Albert, laborer, Mt. Vernon 

Johnson Camma R. farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Johnson Charles, laborer, New Harmony 

Johnson Catherine, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Johnson D F, farmer, Black twp, Mr. Vernon 

Johnson D M, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Johnson Elias, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Johnson Eliza, Lynn twp, New Harmony 

Johnson Elizabeth, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Johnson Eugene (Hayden & Johnson), New Harmony 

Johnson George, laborer, Mt. VERnON 

Johnson George W, farmer, Bethel twp, New Harmony 

Johnson Haywood, farmer, Lynn twp, New Harmony 

Johnson Henry, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Johnson Hyram, farmer, Lynn twp, Solitude 

Johnson James H, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Johnson James N, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Johnson John, farmer, Bethel twp, New Harmony 

Johnson John E, farmer, Bethel twp, New Harmony 

Johnson John L, farmer Robb twp, Poseyville 

Johnson John S, farmer, Lynn twp, Solitude 

Johnson Jasper, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Johnson Phillip E, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Johnson Pitts, farmer, Black twp, Farmersville 

Johnson Pieman, farmer, Black twp, Farmersville 

Johnson Prince (col), laborer, Mt. Vernon 



POSEY COUNTY DIRECTORY. 1 85 

Johnson Richard, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Johnson Rigdon, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Johnson Riley, Baptist clergyman, Griffin 

Johnson Stephen. Mt. Vernon 

Johnson Sidney, farmer • Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Johnson Solomon, Mt. Vernon 

Johhson Stephen A ; farmer, Robb twp, Posey villi: 

Johnson Thomas J, county surveyor, New Harmony 

Johnson Truman, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Johnson Virgil, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Johnson W L, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Johnson Wm M, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Johnson Wm R, farmer, Bethel twp, New Harmony 

Joinder A J. farmer, Black twp, Mr. Vernon 

Jones A D, clerk, New Harmony 

Jones Elizabeth, ; widow), Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Jones Fulton, Mt. Vernon 

Jones Henry L, farmer, Black twp, Mr. Vernon 

Jones James H, farmer, Bethel twp, New Harmony 

Jones Jessie, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Jones John D, painter, New Harmony 

Jones John T, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Jones Leroy W, photographer, Mt. Vernon 

Jones Malinda, (Widow) Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Jones Martha L, (widow) Mt. Vernon 

Jones Mary, Bethel twp, New Harmony 

Jones Peter, farmer, Robb twp, Stewarstville 

Jones S H, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

JOXES SIL.AS P, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Jones Thomas, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Jones Wm, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Jolly Ann (widow), Robb twp, Poseyville 

Jolley Van B, City Clerk, Mt. Vernon 

Jordan Eleba jr, farmer Bethel twp, New Harmony 

Jordan Eleba sr, farmer, Bethel twp, New Harmony 

Jordan Levi, farmer, Bethel twp, New Harmony 

Jordan W R, farmer, Bethel twp, New Harmony 

Jourdan Godfried, farmer, Marrs twp, W'est Franklin 

Jourdan Jacob sr, farmer, Marrs twp, West Franklin 

Jordan Jacob jr, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Jourdan John, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Jourdan Phillip, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Juda Mary W, (col), widow Mt. Vernon 

Jung Peter, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 



l86 POSEY COUNTY DIRECTORV. 

Junker John, jr, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 
Junker John, sr, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 
Junker Phillip, farmer, Black twp, Caborn 
Jurgens Joseph, farmer. Marrs twp, Caborn 
Jurgens Wm, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn * 



K 



Kaffenberger Henry, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Kaffenberger John, farmer, Point twp, Mr. Vernon 

Kahler Henry, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Kahn Isaac, saloon, Mt. Vernon 

Kahn Joe L, restaurant and saloon, Mt. Vernon 

Kaiser Joseph, Mt. Vern« >n 

Kalafant Andrew, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Kampf Andrew J, laborer, Mt. Vernon 

Kansler Charles, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Kapperman Frank, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Kaufman John, jr, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Keck John (Woody &: Keck), Mt. Vernon 

Keck Peter, farmer, Marrs twp, West Franklin 

Keibler Wm, farmer, Marrs twp, West Franklin 

Keissler Charles, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Keisler Josiah, farmer, Lynn twp, Grafton 

Keling James, farmer, Lynn twp, Solitude 

Keling Wm, farmer, Black twp, Farmersville 

Keller C W, jeweler, New Harmony 

Keller James, Mt. Vernon 

Keller John, farmer, Robb twp, Stewartsville 

Kelley F H, farmer, Robb twp, Stewartsville 

Kelley George M, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Kelly Jerry, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Kelton Adam, farmer, Lynn twp, Wadesville 

Kelton Jonathan T, constable, Center twp, Wadesville 

Kemper Wm, farmer, Mt. Vernon 

Kenada Robert F, Mr. Vernon 

Kenner Isaac W, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Kennedy G W, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Kepler Alfred, carpenter, Mt. Vernon 

Keppel Thomas, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Kern Wm, farmer, Bethel twp, New Harmony 

Kester Joseph, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Kidney W F, painter, Mt. Vernon 



POSEY COUNTY DIRECTORY. 1 87 

Kiefer Abraham, farmer, Harmony tvvp, New Harmony 

Kiehl Wm, farmer. Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Kight Artamacy, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Right E R, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Right Jesse F, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Right John F, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Right Robert F, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Right S E, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Right Silas C, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Right W A, watches & jewelry, New Harmony 

Rightly Charles, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

KILBI^GER JOH\, blacksmith, New Harmony 

KIL-ROY JAJIES, Supt Co Schools, Mt. Vernon 

Riltz Jacob, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Rimball John, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Rimball Susan, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Rimball Sylvester, farmer, Lynn twp, Wadesville 

Rimmerlin Charles, jr, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Rimmerlin Charles, sr, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Rimmerlin Henry, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Rimmerlin Jacob, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Rincaid James, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Rincart Milton, farmer, Lynn twp, Wadesville 

Rincheloe Elias, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Rincheloe Emily L, Lynn twp, Solitude 

Rincheloe John, farmer, Robb twp, Stewartsville 

Rincheloe Wm, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

Rincheloe Zachariah, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Riner Henry, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Ring Albert, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Ring George, Assessor Marrs Township, Caborn 

Ring Jeremiah, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Ring John A, farmer, Robb twp, Stewartsville 

Rinney John, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Rirby J T, farmer, Robb twp, Stewartsville 

Rirk Sylvester, house painter, Mt. Vernon 

Rirsch Mathias, shoemaker, St. Wendel 

KISWER WM, deliveryman Adam Express Co, Mt. Vernon 

Rissel Henry, farmer, Marrs twp, West Franklin 

Rissick James, farmer, Lynn twp, Solitude 

Rissner John, laborer, Mt. Vernon 

Ritchill John, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Rittle Peter, farmer, Black twp, Farmersville 

Rivett Henry E, farmer, Lynn twp, Solitude 



SHERWOOD HOUSE, 

Corner of FIRST & LOCUST STREETS, 

WILLIAM A. SHEEWOOD, Proprietor. THEO. RUSSELL, 1 _. . 

E. B. FB03T, Manager. JOHN DEZTES, / Clem - 

EVAHSVILLE, IUD. 

CHOICE SAMPLE ROOMS FOR COMMERCIAL TRAVELERS. 

Rate, $2.00 per Day. 

5obn Zimmerman, 

FashionableBootfe Shoe Maker 

East side of Main, bet. Water and Second Streets, 

MT. VERNON, INP, 

Repairing done with neatness and on short notice- Call and examine his work- 

C. L. FUELLING, 

^fashionable /IfoeixbantTTailor 

37 Main Street, MT. YEMOX, ETO. 

Special attention given to making suits and satisfaction guaranteed 
both in prices and fits. The best material always on hand. 

GEORGE A. FELDMANN, 

-lfBAJlBBR,ir 

WEST SIDE OF MAIN, three doors South of Third Street, 
MT. VERXOX, OTIK 

Shampooing, Hairdressing and Shaving done in the most 
satisfactory manner. 

§gg°; Cigars & Tobacco always on hand ~1gg 



POSEY COUNTY DIRECTORY. 189 

Kivett Noah, farmer, Lynn twp, Solitude 

Klausmeier August, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Kleiner Hermann, barkeeper, Mt. Vernon 

Kleinschmidt Charles, farmer, Marrs twp, West Franklin 

Kleinschmidt Conrad, farmer, Marrs twp, West Franklin 

Klenck Jacob, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Klotz Henry J, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Klotz Anna (widow), Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Kluger Henry, tailor, Mt. Vernon 

Knapp Jacob, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Knapp Maria, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Knapp Peter, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Knepper Amos, carpenter, Black twp, Farmersville 

Knepper Edward (col), laborer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

KXEPPER TMOJIAS, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Knight E D, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Knight Richard, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Knight S E, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Knollman Christopher, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

Knoop Christian, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Knoop John, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Knopfmeier Henry, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

Knowles, T- F. Mt. Vernon 

Knowles John O, farmer, Robb twp, Stewartsville 

Knowles Rhesa, farmer, Mt. Vernon 

Knowles Sarah J, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Knowles Thomas, farmer, Black twp, Mi Vernon 

Knowles Winfield S, farmer, Robb twp, Stewartsville 

Koch Jacob, jr, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Koch Jacob, sr, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Koch John, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Koch Martin, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Koch Nicola, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Koehner Peter, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Koeni Henry farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Koerner Gotlieb, wagonmaker, Mt. Vernon 

Koerner John F, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Koester Fredericka, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Kohl Barbara, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Kohl Bomann, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Kolb Conrad, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

Kolb Frederick, brickmason, Blairsville 

Kolle Henry, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Komenzink Hartxel, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 



I90 POSEY COUNTY DIRECTORY. 

Koppen Engelbert, gardener, Mt. Vernon 

Korf Henry, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Kost Andrew farmer, Marrs twp, West Franklin 

Kostring Henry, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Kramer August, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Kramer Caroline, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Kramer George W, Mt. Vernon 

Kramer Jacob, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Kramer John, farmer, Robinson twp, St. Wendel 

Kramer Robert, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Krasser Wm, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Kratt Louis, laborer, Mt. Vernon 

Krausgrill David, physician, Wadesville 

Krei Charles, harness and saddles, Mt. Vernon 

Krei Louisa, (widow) Mt. Vernon 

Kreipke Theodore, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Kreipke T W, postmaster, Blairsville 

Kreipke Wm, barber New Harmony 

Kreistenstein August, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Kreitsinger Henry, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Kreitsinger James K, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Kron Henry, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Krumie Caroline, Marrs twp, West Franklin 

Krusa Charles, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Kubler Henry, Mt. Vernon 

Kueber Andrew, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Kueber George, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Kueber Henry, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Kueber John, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Kuehn Louis, clerk, Mt. Vernon 

Kuhn John, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Kukert Daniel, laborer, Mt. Vernon 

Kuntz Peter A, harness and saddles, Cynthiana 

Kunze Otto, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Kuykendall Noah, farmer, Robb twp, Stewartsville 



Lackridge E R, farmer, Lynn twp, Grafton 

Laine Joseph, shoemaker, Cynthiana 

Lakeman E W, shoemaker, Poseyville 

Lambert Daniel A, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

Lambath George W, farmer, Lynn twp, Grafton 



POSEY COUNTY DIRECTORY. 191 

Lance James, laborer, New Harmony 

Lance Wm H, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Lane Hiram, farmer, Lynn twp, Grafton 

Lane Jack, Mt. Vernon 

Lane John, farmer, Lynn twp, Grafton 

Lane Thomas, farmer, Lynn twp, Grafton 

Laney Joseph, shoemaker, Cynthiana 

Lang Charles, jr, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Lang Jacob, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Lang John, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Lang Peter, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Lang Wm, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Langelson Albert, farmer Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Langelson Wm, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Langford S, blacksmith, Cynthiana 

Langner Charles, plasterer, Wadesville 

Langsdon August, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Langsdon Edward, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Langsdon Frederick, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Lancz Joseph, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Lappe Isabella, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Lappe John, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

I^ARCjJE WII J, stonemason, Mt. Vernon 

1,A ItBilX Ii J, clerk, Mt. Vernon 

Larkin Nancy (widow), Mt. Vernon 

Larkin R F, book-keeper, Mt. Vernon 

Lauch Nicholas, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Lauer Frederick L, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Lautz James, undertaker, St. Wendel 

Lawrence Andrew, farmer, Marrs twp, Mt. Vernon 

Lawrence David C, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Lawrence Isaac, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Lawrence Jas W, Justice of the Peace, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Lawrence John D, farmer, Marrs twp, Mt. Vernon 

Lawrence Peter S, farmer, Marrs twp, Mt. Vernon 

Layor John G, Justice of the Peace, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Leaf Absalom (col), laborer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Leaman Nicholas, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Leavenworth Sarah, (widow), Mt. Vernon 

Lee Amherst farmer, Lynn twp, Solitude 

Lee John L, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Lee Joseph, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Lee Thomas, farmer, Lynn twp, Solitude 

Leffel & Williams, printers & booksellers, Mt. Vernon 



192 POSEY COUNTY DIREDTORY 

Leffel Barbara, (widow), Mt. Vernon 

Leffel John C, (Leffel & Williams), Mt. Vernon 

Lefler Phillip, farmer, Marrs twp, West Franklin 

Lehr Louis, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Leipold Annie, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

Leopold Phillip & Rheinhardt, wagonmakers, Wadesville 

Leitsen Frederick, farmer, Marrs twp, West Franklin 

LEONARD CHARLES F, merchant, Mt. Vernon 

L£O^ASD FREDERICK P, attorney at law, Mt. Vernon 

Leonard Joseph A, painter, Robb twp, Poseyville 

LEONARD MARK T, insurance agent, Mt. Vernon 

Leonard Wm, laborer, Mt. Vernon 

LEONARD WH P, Editor and Publisher History and Directory 

of Posey County, Mt. Vernon 
Lender John, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 
Leukroth Christiana F (widow), Mt. Vernon 
LEIKROTH REI1HOLD, shoemaker, Mt. Vernon 
Leuthoefer Fred, shoemaker, St. Wendel, 
Leversey Wm C, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 
Lewis Alonzo, farmer, Marrs twp, Mt. Vernon 
Lewis David, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 
Lewis Ferney, teacher, Robb twp, Stewartsville 
Lewis Henry, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 
Lewis James, Constable, Robb twp, Stewartsville 
Lewis J T, grocer, Poseyville 

Lewis Luther, farmer, Harmony twp. New Harmony 
Lewis Patsey, farmer, Marrs twp, Mr. Vernon 
Lewis Robert, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 
Lewis Robert (col), laborer, Mt. Vernon 
Lewis Thompson P, farmer, Marrs twp, Mt. Vernon 
Lichtenberger C S, (F W Lichtenberger & Sons), New Harmony 
Lichtenberger F W, (F W Lichtenberger & Sons), New Harmony 
Lichtenberger F W & Sons, general store, New Harmony 
Lichtenberger G K, farmer, New Harmony 
Lichtenberger G W, laborer, New Harmony 

Lichtenberger H L, (F W Lichtenberger & Sons), New Harmony 
Lichtenberger Lawrence J, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 
Lichtenberger Lawrence L, farmer, Lynn twp, New Harmony 
Lichtenberger M G, carriage trimmer, Mt. Vernon 
Lichtenberger P W, carpenter, New Harmony 
Lichtenberger Richard, carpenter, New Harmony 
Lichtenberger W F, (F W Lichtenberger & Sons), New Harmony 
Lichtenberger W H, saddler, Mt. Vernon 
Lichtenberger Winfield. blacksmith, New Harmony 



POSEY COUNTY DIRECTORY. 1 93 

Linn J B, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Linsey Paul, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

Lintz Frank, Sexton German Cemetery, Mt. Vernon 

Litterton John, farmer, Marrs twp, West Franklin 

Lockwood Charles, New Harmony 

LOCKWOOD J3F© M, Pres't ist Nat. Bank, Mt. Vernon 

Loegil Joseph, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Loehr John, farmer, Lynn twp, Grafton 

Loerch C & G, marble works, Mt. Vernon 

Loerch Charles (C & G Loerch), Mt. Vernon 

Loerch Gotlieb (C & G Loerch), Mt. Vernon 

Logan Byron, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Long James C, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Loudon A Jackson, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

l«OUI>©i¥ WJI, attorney at law, Mt. Vernon 

Loveland T C, carpenter, Mt. Vernon 

Lowe A A, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Lowe A H, merchant, Cynthiana 

Lowe G W, lawyer. Cynthiana 

Lowe G W, jr, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Lowe J N, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Lowe Silas H, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Lowe Wm F, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Lowe Wm H, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Lowenhaupt Benj (Rosenbaum & Bro), Mt. Vernon 

Lowenthal S, clerk, Mt. Vernon 

Lucas Volney, farmer, Bethel twp, New Harmony 

Lucke Caroline (widow), Mt. Vernon 

Lucke J B, laborer, Mt. Vernon 

Ludlow Sarah (widow George), Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Lueur Henry (col), laborer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Luigz Anton, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Lukemyer J H, Methodist clergyman, St. Wendel 

Lupton Wm, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Lurke Lawrence, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Lurke Leopold, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Luttermann Ernest, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Luttermann Frank, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Luttermann Wm, farmer, Robinson twp, Blaisville 

Lutz George D, postmaster, West Franklin 

Lymer Thomas, Mt. Vernon 

Lynn Patrick H, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Lyon James, liquors, New Harmony 

Lyon Wm H, laborer, New Harmony 

Lytle Rachel, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 



194 POSEY COUNTY DIRECTORY. 



M 



MAAS JACOB, clothing, hats, caps, boots and shoes, Mt. Vernon 

Maas S, clerk, Mt. Vernon 

Mackey Abraham, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Mackey Absolom, steam ferry, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Mackey Henry Clay, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Mackey James, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Maddox Isaac N, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Maden Henry, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Magill G T, blacksmith, Mt. Vernon 

Magill Margaret, (widow) Mt. Vernon 

Magill James T, ;R & J T Magill) Mt. Vernon 

HACirlLdi K A r J T. blacksmiths & wagon makers, Mt. Vernon 

Magill Robert, (R&JT Magill, Mt. Vernon 

Magin John, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Mahlenbine August, farmer, Marrs twp, West Franklin 

Mahlenbine Wm Mrs, Marrs twp, West Franklin 

Mahler Bernhardt, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

Maier — (see Meyer, Meier, Myer, Myers) 

UIAIER CONRAD, merchant tailor, Mt. Vernon 

Malone Alonzo, farmer, Lynn twp, New Harmony 

Malone Charles, New Harmony 

Malone H, blacksmith, Cynthiana 

Malone Richard, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

Maltins Conrad, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Maltins George, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Mann Adam, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Mann Christian, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Mann Frederick, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Mann Henry, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Mann Jacob, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Mann Jacob, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Mann Martin, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsvillle 

MMK PHILXIP, merchant tailor, Mt. Vernon 

Mansfield Walter, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

Mansion Robert, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Marian & Harp, saloon, Mt. Vernon 

Marian George, (Marian & Harp), Mt. Vernon 

Marquis Ezekiel, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Marquis Wm. farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Marrs Urbin S, teacher, Marrs twp, Carborn 



POSEY COUNTY DIRECTORY. 1 95 

Marsh Francis M, New Harmony 

Marsh Jesse A, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Marsh John C, farmer, Robb twp, Stewartsville 

Marsh Jonathan, blacksmith, Poseyville 

Marshall John, Mt. Vernon 

Marshall Marion, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Marshall Wm, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Marshau J J, Mt. Vernon 

Martell Thomas, solicitor, Mt. VERnoN 

Martin Alfred, farmer, Black twp, Mr. Vernon 

Martin Alfred, (col) laborer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Martin Andrew, farmer, Marrs twp, West Franklin 

Martin Charles, farmer, Marrs, twp, West Franklin 

Martin E L, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Martin George W, farmer, Marrs twp, West Franklin 

Martin George W, (col), farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Martin Henry, (col), laborer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Martin H W, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Martin James, farmer, Bethel twp, Griffin 

Martin Lewis F, farmer, Marrs twp, West Franklin 

Martin Mariah C, Marrs twp, West Fraklin 

Martin Marshall, farmer, Lynn twp. Mt. Vernon 

Martin Phillip, farmer, Marrs, twp, West Franklin 

Martin Peter, jr, farmer Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Martin Peter M, Mt. Vernon 

Martin Sophronia, Bethel twp, New Harmon 

Martin Thomas J, farmer, Lynn twp,. New Harmony 

Martin Wm, farmer, Marrs twp, West Franklin 

Martin Wm F, farmer, Lynn twp, Solitude 

Martin Wm H, farmer, Lynn twp, Solitude 

Marvel Mary, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

Marx Henry, farmer, Marrs twp, West Franklin 

Marx Joseph, farmer, Marrs twp, West Franklin 

Mashberger Miles, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Mason H H, New Harmony 

Mason Idelaid, New Harmony 

Masten Charles R, farmer, Lynn twp, Solitude 

Matherly Dennis, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Matherly John, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Mathias Gus, clerk, Mt. Vernon 

Matthews John, farmer, Lynn twp, Solitude 

Matthews John T, farmer, Lynn twp, Solitude 

Matthews Lytle, farmer, Lynn twp, Solitude 

Matthews Wm, laborer, New Harmony 



W. P.EDSON, 




-AND- 



COUNSEUOR AT UAW, 

MT. VERNON, INB. 

Office on Fourth Street, near Main, 

Opposite North side of Court House. 

Has always on hand an excellent assortment of 

Xibraii>, Dining IRoom, Iball anfc 

OFFICE FURNITURE, 

ALSO ^ 

Common & Medium Furniture & Chairs 

OF EVERY DESCRIPTION. 

Special Attention given to the manufacture and repairing of Fur- 
niture. PROMPTNESS IN ALL THINGS is his motto. 

MAIN STREET, next door South of Rosenbaum & Bro.'s, 



POSEY COUNTY DIRECTORY. 1 97 

Mattingly Robert, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Mauer George, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Maus Anton, laborer, Mt. Vernon 

May E, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Mayer B, butcher, Blairsville 

Mayer Casper, farmer, Marrs twp, West Franklin 

Mayer Jacob, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Mays John, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

McAdams John, farmer, Marrs twp, West Franklin 

McARTHUR WM JI & ۩, (Wm M McArthur and G R 

Peckinpaugh) druggists, Mt. Vernon 
McCallister A C, (McCallister & Son), Mt. Vernon 
JIcCAELTSTER & SOJT, general store, Mt Vernon 
McCallister Alonzo, (col), farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 
McCallister Edward (col), farmer, Black twp, Mr. Vernon 
McCallister George, (col), blacksmith, Mt. Vernon 
McCallister O L, (McCallister & Son), Mt. Vernon 
McCallister Peter (col), farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 
McCarty Thomas (col), laborer, Mt. Vernon 
McClannahan J W, drayman, Mt. Vernon 
McClannahan W A, laborer, Mt. Vernon 
McClary Isaac, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 
McClure Alfred (col), laborer, Mt. Vernon 
McClure Peter (col), Mt. Vernon 
McConnell A R, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 
McConnell Joseph, farmer, Robb twp, Stewartsville 
McConnell R G, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 
McConnell W H, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 
McCombs Wm, Farmer, Bethel twp, New Harmony 
McCoy Hiram C, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 
McCoy Lewis, farmer, Lynn twp, New Harmony 
McCray Robert, laborer, Mt. Vernon 
McDerment George, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 
McDerment John, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 
McDewill Isaac, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 
McDonald Daniel, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 
McDonald Dennis, physician, New Harmony 
McDonald Patrick, farmer, Mt. Vernon 
McDowell Isaac, (col) laborer, Mt. Vernon 
McDowell John, (col) laborer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 
McDowell Wm, Mt. Vernon 

McElroy James (col), laborer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 
McElroy Robert, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 
McEntire Joseph, laborer, New Harmony 



IQO POSEY COUNTY DIRECTORY. 

McEntire Wm H, laborer, New Harmony 

McEvoy Joseph T (Spillman & McEvoy), Mt. Vernon 

McFall Alexander, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

McFaddin Andrew, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

McFaddin David, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

McFaddin David, jr, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

McFaddin James M, farmer, Lynn twp, Mt. Vernon 

McFaddin 'Lucinda (widow), Mt. Vernon 

McFaddin Paul, farmer. Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

JleFAODIJJ POIilC P, farmer, Lynn twp, Mt. Vernon 

McFaddin Susan, Black twp, Mr. Vernon 

McFaddin Zachariah, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

McGill Benjamin, farmer. Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

McGill James, farmer, Black twp, Mr. Vernon 

McGill Riley, farmer. Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

JIcCiREGrOR BRAD, saw mill, Black twp, Farmersville 

McGregor J P, Black twp. Mt. Vernon 

McGrill James, laborer, New Harmony 

McGutas Mary, Mt. Vernon 

Mcintosh Alvin. farmer, Marrs twp, West Franklin 

Mclntyre Mary, (col — widow), Mt. Vernon 

McKasson George, carpenter, New Harmony 

McKasson James P, carpenter, New Harmony 

McKinney E F, farmer. Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

McKinney J H. cigar maker, Mt. Vernon 

McKinnis Daniel, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

McKinnis James, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

McKinnis Willis, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

McLaughlin Ed, laborer, Mt. Vernon ' 

McMannis Wm, Mt. Vernon 

McNaughton G, carpenter, Cynthiana 

McNeeley Daniel, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

McPherson Frank, farmer, Marrs twp, West Franklin 

McReynolds B F, farmer. Smith twp, Cynthiana 

McReynolds Edward N, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

McReynolds Elizabeth, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

McReynolds Franklin, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

McReynolds G W, farmer, Center twp, Wadesviie 

McReynolds James N, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

McReynolds Leo, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

McReynolds Lucinda, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

McReynolds Nelson, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

McReynolds R W, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

McReynolds S D, druggist, Poseyville 



JPOSEY COUNTY DIRECTORY. 1 99 

McReynolds S M, farmer, Smith twp, Cvnthiana 

McReynolds S S, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

McReynolds T M, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

JttcSMAUTE MICHAEL,, Justice of the Peace, Mt. Vernon 

McVatton G W, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

McVeeley Wm, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Meadows F P, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Meadows George H, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Meadows George W, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Meadows Gideon, farmer, Robb twp, Stewartsville 

Meadows M B, laborer, Mt. Vernon 

MEEKER LEE, saloon, Mt. Vernon 

Meeks Wm, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Meier — (see Maier, Mayer, Meyer, Myer, Myers 

Meier August, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Meier Frederick, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Meier Mrs George, Marrs twp, West Franklin 

Meier Henry F, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Meinshein Adam, farmer, Marrs twp, West Franklin 

Meinshein Catherine, farmer, Marrs twp, West Franklin 

Meinshein Conrad, farmer, Marrs twp, West Franklin 

Meinshein Peter, farmer, Marrs twp, West Franklin 

Meisner Charles, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Meisner Emily J, Lynn twp, Wadesville 

Menhaus H, wagonmaker, St. Wendel 

Menhaus J, wagonmaker, St. Wendel 

Mental John, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Mental Harry, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

ME^TZIES CJ V, Attorney at law, Mt. Vernon 

Merchanthouse Jacob, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Meredith J C, farmer, Bethel twp, New Harmony 

Merrill Marshal Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Merritt Andrew, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

Merritt Ephraim, farmer, Robb twp, Stewartsville 

Messer Matthew, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Metcalf Edward, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Metcalf James K, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Meyer — (see Mater, Meier, Myer Myers 

Meyer Baldasar, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Meyer Christian, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Meyer Frederick, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Meyer John, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Miles John, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Miller A B, Policeman Mt. Vernon 



200 POSEY COUNTY DIRECTORY. 

Miller A H, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 
Miller B M, farmer, Bethel twp, New Harmony 
Miller Charles, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 
Miller Cornelius E, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 
Miller Daniel, farmer, Lynn twp, Solitude 
Miller Frederick, farmer, Lynn twp, Mt. Vernon 
Miller George W, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 
Miller Godfrey, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 
Miller Gottlieb, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 
Miller Helena, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 
Miller Henry, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 
Miller Henry F, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 
Miller John, merchant, St. Phillip 
Miller John H, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 
Miller John N, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 
Miller J T, carpenter, Cynthiana 
Miller John T, laborer, Mt. Vernon 

JIILA.ER JUMUS C, Postmaster & Confectionery, New Har- 
mony 
Miller J W, marble works, New Harmony 
Miller Lawrence, farmer, Marrs, twp, Caborn 
Miller Louis, farmer Robb twp, Poseyville 
Miller Louis D, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 
Miller Marcus, blacksmith, St. Wendel 
Miller N E, New Harmony 

Miller Oliver V N, farmer,*Point twp, Mr. Vernon 
Miller Theodore, farmer, Bethel twp, New Harmony 
Miller Thomas R, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 
Miller W B, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 
Miller W F, clerk, New Harmony 
Miller Wm, laborer, Mt. Vernon 
Miller Wm H, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 
Miller Wm S, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 
Mills Alexander, blacksmith, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 
Mills Felix, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 
Mills F N jr, farmer, Lynn twp, Mt. Vernon 
Mills Fielden N, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon" 
Mills George, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 
Mills Henry, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 
Mills James H, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 
Mills Jonathan, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 
Mills Joseph, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 
Mills Otis, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 
Mills R J, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 



POSEY COUNTY DIRECTORY. 

Mills Thomas, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairlville 

HII.MJt SYE.VA1NJS, ex-postmaster, Mt. Vernon 

Millet John, farmer, Bethel twp, Griffin 

Minard Frank, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Minor Adam, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Minor George, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Mitz Henry, farmer Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Mitz Jacob, Mt. Vernon 

Mitz John, jr, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Mitz John, sr, farmer Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Mobly Henry F, farmer, Bethel twp, New Harmony 

Mobly Nancy, Bethel twp, New Harmony 

Moell John F, shoemaker, Cynthiana 

MILLER JOHBf, cooper, Mt. Vernon 

Moit Alonzo, farmer, Black twp, Grafton 

MOIT BEXJAJIIX K, farmer, Black twp, Grafton 

Moit L W, farmer, Black twp, Grafton 

Moll Henry, tailor, Mr. Vernon 

Mollen Lewis, farmer, Lynn twp, New Harmony 

Mollen Samuel, farmer, Lynn twp, New Harmony 

Monroe A H, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Monroe Edwin, farmer, Black twp, Farmersville 

Monroe James H, Black twp, Farmersville 

Monroe Walter, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Monroe Wm, farmer, Point twp, Mr. Vernon 

Montgomery A B, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Montgomery Andrew, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

MOXTGOMUIY B B„ physician, Cynthiana 

Montgomery Francis M, Robl) twp, Stewartsville 

Montgomery George, Smith twp j Cynthiana 

Montgomery Ira, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Montgomery James, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Montgomery John E, Robb twp, Stewartsville 

Montgomery J R, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Montgomery N, butcher, Cynthiana 

Montgomery Robert, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Montgomery R J (widow), Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Montgomery S B, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Montgomery V R, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Montgomery W C, New Harmony 

Montgomery W T, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Montgomery W \Y, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Moore Alexander, farmer, Black twp, Mr. Vernon 

Moore Angelo, farmer, Lynn twp, Mr. Vernon 



2 02 POSEY COUNTY DIRECTORY. 

Moore Geo W, plasterer, Mr. Vernon 

Moorehead J M, farmer, Marrs twp, West Franklin 

Moore Jacob, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Moore James, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon^ 

Moore James P, laborer, Mt. Vernon 

Moore John A. farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon ] 

Moore John H, Prin High School, New Harmony 

Moore John W, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony) 

Moore Joseph, Attorney at Law, Mt. Vernon 

Moore Mathias, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

JIOOltJE tfOAH, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon^ 

Moore Robert, hostler, Mt. Vernon 

Moore Thomas, laborer, Mt. Vernon ; 

Moore Wm, teamster, Nen Harmony 

Moore Wm, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Moore Wm T, Mr. Vernon 

Morekin George, farmer, Marrs twp, Mt. Vernon 

Moreway Conrad, farmer, Marrs twp, West Franklin 

Morloch Andrew, farmer, Black twp, Mr. Vernon 

Morrison Green, farmer, Lynn twp, Mr. Vernon 

Morrison Wm, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

Mosberger Sylvester, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Moss Benjamin, Mt. Vernon 

Mott & Co, groceries, New Harmony 

Mott John, jr (Mott & Co), New Harmony 

Mott John, sr, cooper, New Harmony 

Mott Joseph, cooper, New Harmony 

Moulder (J F, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Mounts L A, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Mounts Liberty, farmer, Bethel twp, Griffin 

Mounts Lowery, farmer, Bethel twp, New Harmony 

Moutry Isaac, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Moutry Johnson, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Moutry Zachariah, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Mowery Henry, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Moye Albert L, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

Moye George W, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

Moye Elizaoeth, Center twp, Wadesville 

Moye James H, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

Moye Jessie L, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

Moye Joel H, Center twp, Wadesville 

Moye John L, cooper, New Harmony 

Moye Joseph L, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

Moye Thomas G, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 



POSEY COUNTY DIRECTORY. 203 

Muck Jacob, hostler, New Harmony 

Mueller Phillip, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Mumford Thomas Jr, (Thrall & Mumford) New Harmony 

Mumford Thomas Sr, capitalist, New Harmony 

MUNSEY FRANK A, farmer, Lynn twp, Grafton 

Munsey John B, farmer. Black twp, Grafton 

Munchhoff Ferdinand, Mt. Vernon 

Munchhoff Herman R, deliveryman, Mt. Vernon 

Munte Max, conveyancer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Murphy Aaron F, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Murphy Aaron T, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Murphy Daniel, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Murphy George W, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Murphy Hiram, (col), laborer, New Harmony 

Murphy Isaac D, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Murphy Jesse, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Murphy John B, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Murphy John C, farmer, Robd twp, Poseyville 

Murphy Leander, farmer, Bethel twp. New Harmony 

Murphy Thomas, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Murphy Win P, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

MUSSEEMAN mCHAEL, shoemaker, Mt. Vernon 

Muth Conrad, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

MUTZ CONRAD, Mt. Vernon 

Myer — (see Mater, Meyer, Meier, Myers) 

Myer Martin, farmer, Bethel twp, New Harmony 

Myer Wm P, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Myers Charles, cooper, Mt. Vernon 

Myers Nicholas, cooper, Mt. Vernon 

Myers Peter, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Myers Silas, saddler, New Harmony 

Myers Wm G, butcher New Harmony 



N 



Naas Frederick, farmer, Robinson twp, St. Wendel 
NAAS GEORGE, (Raben & Naas), Mt. Vernon 
NAAS JOHN, saloon and grocer, Mt. Vernon 
Nappier Wm D, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 
Naser John, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 
Naser Martin, farmer. Marrs twp, Caborn 
Nash Andrew, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 
Nash Andrew J, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 



HERRMANN & PRO. 



MANUFACTURERS OP 

m 




Buggies & Plowhandles 

MANUFACTURERS' AGENTS FOR 

Howe's Scales, 

Champion Reapers & Mowers 

Marsh Deering Twine Binders, 

OLIVER CHILLED PLOWS 

And several different kinds of 

Steel Plows, Sulky Plows, Cultivators, 

CORN DRILLS and PLANTERS, 

4 Jfooaier and -ifphampion 4(grain -4||rilta, 

BIRDSELL & VICTOR CLOVER HULLERS, 

HOOSIER & ADVANCE HAY RAKES, 

HnrsE Hay Forks & Fixtures, 

Belleville, Nichols Shepard & Russell Threshing Machines, 

Engines, Horse Powers, Iron Wind Engines, Pumps, Corn Shellers, 

Cider Mills, Can- Mills, & Evaporators, Dickey 

Fanning Mills. Post Hole Diggers, 

Farm Bells, Fence Wire, 

Fertilizers. &c. 

17 «& 1» Wain Street. EVAXSVILXE, MTI>. 



POSEY COUNTY DIRECTORY. 205 

Nash Cavett, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

Nash Charles E, farmer, Robb twp, Stewartsville 

Nash James, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Nash John, Mt. Vernon 

Nash John A, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Nash Joseph M, Center twp, Wadesville 

Nash Nancy, Center twp, Wadesville 

Nash Wm, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Nation Mary A, Lynn twp, Solitude 

Nation Thomas L, farmer, Lynn twp, Solitude 

Neal Charles, New Harmony 

Neal Daniel, physician, New Harmony 

Neal Edward, druggist, Bethel twp, Griffin 

Neal Jesse M, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Neal John, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Neale Daniel, traveling agent, Mt. Vernon 

Neale Henry, farmer, Mt. Vernon 

Neale Thomas H, farmer, Mt. Vernon 

Neale Thornton W, farmer, Mt. Vernon 

Nebe Charles, Mt. Vernon 

Neff Henry, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Neff John A, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Nefsker Xavier, miller, Mt. Vernon 

Neidermeier Frederick, Constable Robinson Township, Blairsville 

Neimeyer Anton, farmer, Marrs twp, West Franklin 

Neimeyer Frank, farmer, Marrs twp, West Franklin 

Nelson Henry, farmer, Lynn twp, Solitude 

Nelson J Matt, farmer, Mt. Vernon 

Nelson Jeremiah, farmer, Robb twp, Stewartsville 

Nelson Malinda, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Nelson Thomas J, farmer, Lynn twp, Solitude 

Nelson Wm D, (J W Whitworth & Co), Mt. Vernon 

Nerriman John, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Nesbet Joseph M, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Nessler Bryant, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Nessler John W, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Nessler Joseph, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Nessler Wm H, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Neu Phillip, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Neuman Anton, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

tfEUMAltf A W, undertaker, Mt. Vernon 

Neuman Henry, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Neuman John, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Neuschafer John, jr, blacksmith, Mt. Vernon 



206 POSEY COUNTY DIRECTORY. 

Neuschafer John, sr, carpenter, Mt. Vernon 

New Wm, pilot, New Harmony 

Newman Charles, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Newman Christian H, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Newman George, laborer, Mt. Vernon 

Newsell J C, Mt. Vernon 

Newsom Albert G, saloon, New Harmony 

Newsom Milton, farmer, Bethel twp, New Harmony 

Nickens James, farmer, Lynn twp, Solitude 

Nickens John, farmer, Lynn twp, Solitude 

Nickens Thomas, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

NIEDEREST JOHN, saloon and billiards, Mt. Vernon 

Niedermier P, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Niehause Peter, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Nienhaus Frederick, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Nienhaus Gerhardt, farmer, Robinson tw T p, Blairsville 

Nienhaus Rosina, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Nigg Elizabeth, Marrs twp, Caborn 

NJLSBET J CJ, farmer, Cynthiana 

Noble Riley, farmer, Lynn twp, Solitude 

Noel Izaiah. farmer, Lynn twp, Solitude 

Noel John, sen, Mt. Vernon 

Noel S P, farmer, Point twp, Mt Vernon 

NOEL W^I J E, sewing machtnes, Mt. Vernon 

Noelle Adolph, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Noelle F Ff, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Nolan Wm, farmer, Lynn twp, Wadesville 

Nolan Allan, farmer, Bethel twp, New Harmony 

Nolan Charles, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Nolan Reuben, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Noll Christian, farmer. Marrs tw T p, West Franklin 

IOLTE E W, speculator, Mt. Vernon 

Norris John, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Norris Joshua, farmer, Robb twp, Stewartsville 

Norris L H, farmer. Bethel twp, New Harmony 

Norris Wm, farmer, Bethel twp, Griffin 

Norris W E, farmer, Bethel twp, New Harmony 

Nott Wm, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Nottingham Wm, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Nubling John, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Nurhause Henry, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

O 

Oaks Isaac N, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 
Oatman Benjamin, farmer, Bethel twp, New Harmony 



POSEY COUNTY DIRECTORY. 207 

Oberdorfer Sampson, butcher, Mt. Vernon 

Oberdorfer Solomon, Mt. Vernon 

Odell A, farmer, Harmony twp. New Harmony 

Odell James W, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Oeth Charles, jr, farmer, Marrs twp, West Franklin 

Oeth Charles, sr, farmer, Marrs twp, West Franklin 

Oeth John, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Oglesby Charles W, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Oglesby Jonathan, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Oglesby W F, teamster, New Harmony 

Oliver David, farmer. Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Oliver George, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

Oliver Job, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

Oliver John L, farmer, Marrs twp, Mt. Vernon 

Oliver Samuel R, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

Oliver Thompson, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

Oliver Win, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Oliver Wm, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

Oliver Wilson, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

O'Neal J W, barber, New Harmony 

Onyet Henry, teamster, Mt. Vernon 

Orman Charles, farmer, Lynn twp, New Harmony 

Orman Gabriel, farmer, Lynn twp, New Harmony 

Orman George, farmer, Lynn twp, New Harmony 

Orman Harrison, laborer, New Harmony 

Orman H C, farmer, Lynn twp, New Harmony 

Orman John G, farmer, Lynn twp, New Harmony 

Orman Mary, Lynn twp, New Harmony 

Orman Matthew, farmer, Lynn twp, New Harmony 

Orman Milton, farmer, Lynn twp, New Harmony 

Orman Wm L, painter, Mt. Vernon 

Ormsby John, farmer, Bethel twp, New Harmony 

Orth Conrad, farmer, Marrs twp, West Franklin 

Orth Henry, farmer, Marrs, twp, West Franklin 

Orth Jacob, farmer, Marrs twp, West Franklin 

Orth John, farmer, Marrs twp, West Franklin 

Orth Martha, farmer, Marrs twp, West Franklin 

Orth Michael, farmer, Marrs twp, West Franklin 

Orton Matthew, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Oruts John, farmer, Bethel twp, New Harmony 

Osborn Asson, farmer, Farmersville 

Osche Wm, farmer, Marrs twp, West Franklin 

Oschman George, farmer, Robinson tw, St. Wendel 

Oschman Henry, farmer, Marrs twp. West Franklin 



2 o8 POSEY COUNTY DIRECTORY 

Oschman Louis, farmer, Marrs twp, West Franklin 

Oschman Louisa (widow), Mt. Vernon 

Oschman Magdalena, farmer, Robinson twp, St. Wendel 

Osmann Wm, farmer, Robinson twp, Parkers 

Ourtel Henry, stonemason, Blairsville 

Overman John, chairmaker, New Harmony 

Overstreet Jed, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Overton Christian, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Overton Edmond, farmer, Bethel twp, New Harmony 

Overton John H, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Overton John W, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Overton Julian, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Overton Nathan farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Overton SEE, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Overton W H, farmer, Bethel twp, New Harmony 

Overton Willard, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

OWEI ALFRED I>, County Auditor, Mt. Vernon 

Owen E F & Co, Hardware & Agl Implts. New Harmony 

Owen & Fitton, Real Estate & Loan Agents, New Harmony 

Owen E F, (E F Owen & Co), New Harmony 

OWEN ERNEST D, 

ATTORNEY AT LAW, 

Owen H P, (E F Owen & Co), New Harmony 
Owen Josiah, Mt. Vernon 

Owen Julian D, (Ford, Owen & Co), New Harmony 
Owen Richard, scientist, New Harmony 
Owen Tulliber, farmer, Robinson twp, Parkers 
OWE1T WM I>, capitalist, New Harmony 
Owens Flavius. farmer, center twp, Wadesville 
Owens Monterville, farmer, Lynn twp, New Harmony 
Owing John, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 



Paddock George, Gardener, New Harmony 
Paddock John C, solicitor, Mt. Vernon 
PAGE ELIJAH, fisherman, Mt. Vernon 
Page W M, laborer, Mt. Vernon 
Paine Lewis, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 
Paper Andrew, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 



POSEY COUNTY DIRECTORY. 209 

Papenmeier Frederick jr, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Parke Charles A, Banker, Mt. Vernon 

Parker James M, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

Parks John W, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Patmore J L, Painter, Mt. Vernon 

Patry John, Center twp, Wadesville 

Patterson A Mrs, milliner, Mt. Vernon 

Patterson Ephraim (col), laborer, Mt. Vernon 

Patterson Wm A, carpenter, Mt. Vernon 

Paul George, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

PAUL, JOIOJ P, Sir Com, and Chief of Fire Dep't,MT. Vernon 

Pawnal Charles, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

Pearce Eugene, farmer, Black twp, Grafton 

Pearl Jeffrey, wagonmaker, New Harmony 

Pearman Aaron, farmer, Black twp, Farmersville 

Pearman James M, farmer, Mt. Vernon 

Pearman John W, farmer, Black twp, Farmersville 

Pearman Matilda, Black twp. Farmersville 

Pearman Noah, farmer, Black twp, Farmersville 

Pearman Samuel B, farmer, Black twp, Farmersville 

Pearman Samuel B Jr, farmer, Black twp, Farmersville 

Pearman Wm H, farmer, Black twp, Farmersville 

PEABSE HI W, attorney at law, Mt. Vernon 

PEARSE SIIflEOItf H, physician, Mt. Vernon 

PECKI^PAII«H « R, physician, Mt. Vernon 

Peek Clements, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Pelham Louis, insurance and notary, New Harmony 

Pelt Hume, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

Pelt Nancy, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

Pendell Alfred, Constable Marrs Township, Caborn 

Pendell Harrison, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Pendell John, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Penfold Elizabeth, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Pen fold Jessie, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Pepper Joseph B, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

PEPPEBDAY CM AS E, clerk, Mt. Vernon 

Perine Thos M, teamster, New Harmony 

Perkins James, farmer, Lynn twp, Solitude 

Pero Lewis, farmer, Bethel twp, New Harmony 

Perry George, farmer, Robb twp, StewArsville 

Perry Henry, farmer, Black twp, Mr. Vernon 

Perry Milton, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Peter Andrew, farmer, Bethel twp, New Harmony 

Peter Henry, farmer, Robinson twp, Parkers 



2IO POSEY COUNTY DIRECTORY. 

Peter John, farmer, Robinson twp, Parkers 

Peters Jacob, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Peters Phillip, Miller, Mt. Vernon 

PFEFFER & TR1FDT, flouring mills, Mt. Vernon 

PFEFFER JOH3k Jr, (Wolf, Freeman & Pfeffer) Mt. Vernon 

Pfeffer John sr, (Pfeffer &: Traudt), Mt. Vernon 

Pfeiffer Louis jr farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Pfeiffer Louis sr, farmer, Black twp, Mt. \ 7 ernon 

Pfettscher Charles, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Pfettscher Frederick J sr, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Pfifer Margaret (widow), Mt. Vernon 

Pfister A, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Pfister Martin, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Pfister Michael, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Pfoht George W, barber, Mt. Vernon 

Phelps George, farmer, Black twp, Mr. Vernon 

Phillips A H, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Phillips Anson, farmer, Black twp. Mt. Vernon 

Phillips David, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Phillips David L, farmer, Black twp, Farmersville 

Phillips Elijah, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Phillips Elisha, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Phillips Ely. farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Phillips Felix, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

Phillips H L, farmer, Lynn twp, Solitude 

Phillips John, farmer. Robb twp, Stewartsville 

Phillips John, farmer. Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Phillips John M, farmer, Center twp. Wadesville 

Phillips John S, postmaster, Point twp, Hovey 

Phillips John T, farmer. Black twp, Farmersville 

Phillips L T, laborer New Harmony 

Phillips Marcus farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Phillips Marion, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

Phillips Moses, farmer, Black twp, Farmersville 

Phillips Nelson E, farmer, Lynn twp, Solitude 

Phillips Ransom, farmer, Black twp, Mr. Vernon 

Phillips Rolph, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Phillips Wm, farmer. Black twp, Farmersville 

Phillips, Wm F, farmer, Lynn twp, Solitude 

Pickles Oscar, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Pickles Wm, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Pinkstaff E, liveryman, Cynthiana 

Pisley H W, liveryman, New Harmony 

Pisley Thomas, laborer, New Harmony 



POSEV COUNTY DIRECTORY. 

Pitcher H C, attorney at law, Ml Vernon 

Pitcher John, lawyer, Mt. Vernon 

Pitcher Wm, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

PITTS EDWARD A, farmer, Lynn twp, Solitude 

Pitts Jeddy, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Pitts Joseph, farmer ; Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Pitts Magnus C, farmer, Lynn twp, Solitude 

Pitts Wm C, farmer, Lynn twp, Soliutde 

Piatt Barlow, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Piatt Eliza, (widow) Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Piock Henry, wagonmaker, Wadesville 

Plummer Odious, Constable Marrs Township, Caborn 

Plummer Thomas J, farmer, Harmony twp. New Harmony 

Pool Daniel, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Pool Sidney, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Porter David (col) farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Porter E B, (col), laborer, New Harmony 

Porter L A, physician, Black twp, Farmersville 

Porth Phillip, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Pote Henry, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Pote Morris B, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Pote Thomas, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Potter John S, farmer, Bethel twp, New Harmony 

Potter Lemuel, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Potter Parmelio, Bethel twp, New Harmony 

Powell Bettie B, (col), Mt. Vernon 

Pretorious Phillip, clerk, Mt. Vernon 

Pretorious Wm, lumber dealer, Mt. Vernon 

Prewitt George VV, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Prewitt S A, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Price Alfred, Mt. Vernon 

Price Franklin, Bethel twp, New Harmony 

Price Isaac J, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Price Lamoin, farmer, Robb Stewartsville 

Price Romelia B, farmer, Robb twp, Stewartsville 

Price Thomas P, New Harmony 

Price Wm, farmer, Robb twp, Stewartsville 

Pritchard Florin, live stock, New Harmony 

Pritchard John F, Robb twp, Stewartsvili e 

Pritchard Reuben (col), laborer, Mt. Vernon 

Pritchard Wm S, farmer, Robb twp, Stewartsville 

Pritchett Lemoine, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Pritzsch Charles, jr, gunsmith, New Harmony 

Pritzsch Charles, sr, guns and ammunition, New Harmony 



George S. Green. Philo A. Hutcheson. 

GIIEEXT <& IIUTCHESOIT, 

Conveyancers & Abstractors of Real Estate. 

Office: Court House, MT. VERNON, IND. 

dealer in /Garble 1 0ranite, 

Keeps constantly on hand a fine and complete assortment of Finished Work, Italian 

Marble, Granites, Slabs for Headstones and Monumental Work. 

8®"Lettering & Carving done in the best style. ~3Bfl NeW Harmony, Ind. 

S. ZE3L. GKESOl^EH^EEIIEIE^ 

dealer in Stoves & tinware, 

Main Street, bet. Water & First, MT. VEENON, IND. 

BS^"Roofing and Guttering promptly and neatly done. All work guaranteed to give satisfaction. 



OHIGOH mil CO,, 

Custom work done quickly and well, Patronage solicited. 



PETER WEBER, 

Merchant Tailor and Dealer in Gent's Furnishing Goods, 

Main Street, opposite Post Office, NEW HAEMONY. IND. 

G-E1TTEYBEOS., 

Proprietor LIVERY, FEED k SALE STABLE. 

Also Dealers in all Kinds of Live Stock. 
NEW HARMONY, IND. 

Manufacturer of Carriages, Buggies and Wagons, 

All kinds of Machinery Repaired Horse Shoeing a Specialty. 

NEW HARMONY, IND. 

SHBiiBEE £z BEIG-&S, 

D£P0T ST0R£, 

Retail Dealers in Dry Goods and Groceries, Hats, Caps and Notions. 

.A.11 3sin.a.s of Coiintry X=rcia.vL=e "bo-va.g-2i.t a.=s.cL sola.. 
STEWARTSVILLE, IND. 



POSEY COUNTY DIRECTORY. 213 

Proeller John, Mt. Vernon 

Prosser C L, foreman "Posey County Republican", Mr. Vernon 

Pruitt G W, merchant, Cynthiana 

Pruitt S A, carpenter, Cynthiana 

Puff Joseph, Mt. Vernon 

Pulliam Jane (widow), Mt. Vernon 

Pulliam John G, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Pulliam Johnson, farmer, Robb twp, Psoeyville 

Pulliom W Z, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Purcell Wm T, farmer, Lynn twp, Solitude 



Q 



Quenzer Adam, carpenter, Mt. Vernon 
Quenzer Henry, Robinson twp, Blairsville [ 
Quick Charles, sewing machines, Mt. Vernon 
Quick Wm Duke, Policeman, Mt. Vernon 
Quinn Daniel, New Harmony 

R 

RABEX & If A AS, (Anton, Raben & Geo Naas), dry goods, St. 

Wendel and Mt. Vernon 
IMBI1X AtfTOtf, (Raben & Naas), St. Wendel 
Raben John R, clerk, St. Wendel 
Raben Joseph, Robinson twp, St. Wendel 
Raben Raschker, Robinson twp, St. Wendel 
Raber Charles, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 
Raber Henry, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 
Raber Jacob Jr, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 
Raber Jacob Sr, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 
Rachels Calvin L, farmer, Bethel twp, New Harmony 
Rachels James R, farmer, Bethel twp, New Harmony 
Rachels Wm T, farmer, Bethel twp, New Harmony 
Ragland E B, Mt. Vernon 

Ragland James, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 
Raleigh S J, farmer, Robb twp, Stewartsville 
Ramming Bartholomew J, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 
Ramsey Alonzo, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 
Ramsey Annanias, jr, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 
Ramsey Annanias, sr, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 
RAMSEY D <J, physician, Mt. Vernon 



214 POSEY COUNTY DIRECTORY. 

Ramsey Henry C, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

Ramsey James W, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Ramsey John, farmer, Lynn twp, Wadesville 

Ramsey John A, farmer, Lynn twp, Wadesville 

Ramsey John S, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

Ramsey Joseph, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Ramsey Lewis, farmer, Lynn twp, Wadesville 

Ramsey Mary, Center twp, Wadesville 

Ramsey Nancy, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

Ramsey Niblack, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Ramsey Stephen, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

Ramsey Thomas, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

Ramsey Wm H, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

Randolph Charles G, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

Randolph David, hotel, New Harmony 

Randolph E H, Mt. Vernon 

Randolph E J, trader, Mt. Vernon 

Randolph H P, farmer Mt. Vernon 

Randolph Isaac, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

Randolph James, carpenter, New Harmony 

Randolph James E, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

Randolph Marcus, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

Randolph Robert, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Randolph Thompson, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

Randolph Wm, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Ran key August, farmer, Lynn twp, Wadesville 

Rankin G W, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Rapier Samuel (col), farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Raschke Charles, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Rash John, farmer, Marrs twp, West Franklin 

Ratley G B, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Ratliff Abram, farmer, Mt. Vernon 

Rati iff P, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Rawhngs E A, laborer, New Harmony 

Rawlings M V, New Harmony 

Rawlings Rocky R, laborer, New Harmony 

Rawlings Samuel O, physician, New Harmony 

Read George, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Read James, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Reagin C H, drayman. Mt. Vernon 

REA€iIi\ HARVEY B, carpenter, Mt. Vernon 

Rebeyre Alfred, farmer, New Harmony 

Rebeyre John, capitalist, New Harmony 

Recken Asmus, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 



POSEY COUNTY DIRECTORY. 215 

Recken Henry, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Reckert Fritz, shoemaker, Mt. Vernon 

Record Alexander, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

Record Alfred, farmer, Lynn twp, Wadesville 

Record Taylor I, farmer, Wadesville 

Record Thomas A, farmer, Lynn twp, Wadesville 

Redman Edward, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Redman Eliza, Black tw, Mt. Vernon 

Redman James, tile manufacturer Cynthiana 

Redman J N, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Redman Marshall, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

REDMAJT TAYLOR, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Redman W E, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Redman Wm. farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Reed Allen, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Reed P, stockman, Cynthiana 

Reed Washington, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Reed Wm, Justice of the Peace, New Harmony 

Reeder Francis M, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Reese George M, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Reesman J H, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Reeves Albert, farmer, Center, twp, Wadesville 

Reeves Francis M, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Reeves Henry M, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Reeves James, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Reeves James H, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Reeves John H, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Reeves Joseph, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Reeves Joseph M, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Reeves Marion, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

KI:EVI:S WM, saloon, Mt. Vernon 

Reeves Wm T, Harmony, twp, New Harmony 

Reichert Eckhart Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Reichert Gus, musician, Mt. Vernon 

Reichert John, laborer, Mt. Vernon 

Reinhart Frederick, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Reinhart J M, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Reinheimer Frank, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Reinheimer John, farmer, Robinson twp, St. Wendel 

Reinheimer Peter, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Reintz Herman, farmer, Point twp, Mr. Vernon 

Reintz Rudolph, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Reis Frank, farmer, Robinson twp, Parker 

Reising Paul, blacksmith, Cynthiana 



2i6 POSEY COUNTY DIRECTORY. 

Reisinger John, farmer. Robinson twp, Blairsville 

REISTER CHRISTIAN H, JR, saloon, Cynthiana 

Relleike Frank, farmer, Robinson twp, St. Wendel 

Renchler John, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Reno A J E, farmer, Lynn twp, Solitude 

Repine Israel, laborer, Mt. Vernon 

Rexink John, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Reynolds G S, fanner, Robb twp, Poseyyille 

Reynolds Isaac C, farmer, Robb twp, Stewartsville 

Reynolds John A, New Harmony 

Reynolds Miles E, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Rhein Charles, shoemaker, Mt. Vernon 

Rhoads Levi, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Rhoads W H, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Rhoder Casper, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

Rhoder Henry, farmer, Black twp Mt. Vernon 

Rice Abner, (col) farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Rice John, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Rich Charles, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Rich John, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Richard W, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Richards Burton A, farmer, Lynn twp, Wadesville v 

Richards John T, Mt. Vernon 

Richards Mary, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Richards Polly, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Richards Richard, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Richards Wm, farmer, Lynn twp, Wadesville 

Richardson Thomas, farmer, Robb twp, Stewartsville 

Richter Charles, Mt. Vernon 

Richter Christian, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Rickens Albert, farmer, Robb twp, Stewartsville 

Rickens Charles, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Rickens, Frederick, farmer, Robb twp, Stewartsville 

Ricket John, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Ricketts Joh T, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

Rickman Abner, farmer, Lynn twp, Solitude 

Rickman Nicholas, farmer, Lynn twp, Wadesville 

Ridenour Henry, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Ridenour James, farmer, Mt. Vernon 

Ridenour John, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Ridenour Wm, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Riepe Henry, farmer, Mans twp, Caborn 

Ries George, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Ries J Thomas, guns & ammunition, Mt. Vernon 



POSEY COUNTY DIRECTORY. 217 

Rifner Jesse, laborer, Mr. Vernon 

Rightmyer John, farmer, Lynn twp, Solitude 

Riser Anton, fanner, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Riser John N, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Rister Eliza, farmer, Robb twp, Stewartsville 

Rister James, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Ritzert Henry, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Ritzert John, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

River John, farmer, Lynn twp, Wadesville 

Roach Bazil, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Robb Eliza J, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Robb Hugh, Robb twp, Stewartsville 

Robb J W, merchant, Stewartsville 

Robb Louisa, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Robb Lucinda, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Robb Thomas, Robb twp, Stewartsville 

Robb Thomas L, farmer, Robb twp, Stewartsville 

Robb Virgil E, farmer. Robb twp, Stewartsville 

Robb Winfield, clerk, New Harmony 

Robb Wm A, Robb twp, Stewartsville 

Roberts James, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Roberts John, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Roberts Milton M, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Roberts Thomas, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Roberts Thos J, New Harmony 

Roberts Thomas T, jr, farmer Robb twp, Stewartsville 

Roberts Warren, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Roberts Wm H, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Robinson Harry, actor, New Harmony 

Robinson Jesse, Mt. Vernon 

Robinson John A, farmer, Lynn twp, Wadesville 

Robinson Oliver S, farmer, New Harmony 

Robin Wm, Mt. Vernon 

Robson Austin, farmer, Bethel twp, New Harmony 

Robson Richard P, blacksmith and wagonmaker, New Harmony 

Robson Thomas J, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

Rodgers Catherine, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Rodgers Isaac, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Rodgers Nathaniel, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Rodley Daniel, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Rodman , brickmaker, Cynthiana 

Rodrian Christina, Robinson twp, Blairsville 
Roedel Andrew, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 
Roedel Anna, Marrs twp, Caborn 



2l8 POSEY COUNTY DIRECTORY. 

Roedel Christopher, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Roedel George, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Roedel Godfrey, farmer, Black twp, Mr. Vernon 

Roedel Henry, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Roedel John A, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Roesmeier Hermann, farmer, Robinson twp, St. Wendel 

Roessner Charles, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Roessner Henry, jr, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Roessner Henry, sr, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Rogers H B, clerk, New Harmony 

Rogers Patrick, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Rogers Wm, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Roos Michael, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Roper Louis, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Rose G W. broom manfr, Cynthiana 

Roseborough W S, butcher Cynthiana 

ROSEMBAUM BROS, general merchandise, Mt. Vernon 

Rosenbaum Daniel (Rosenbaum Bros), Mt. Vernon 

Rosenbaum Jacob, clerk, Mt. Vernon 

Rosenbaum Julius, clerk, Mt. Vernon 

Rosenbaum Michael, clerk, Mt. Vernon 

Rosenbaum Moses (Rosenbaum Bros), Mt. Vernon 

Rosengart Max, groceries and saloon, Mt. Vernon 

ROSEXKRAXS E W, Ass't Cash. First Nat. Bk, Mt. Vernon 

ROSEXKRAXS J OH* E, bank clerk, Mt. Vernon 

Rosenhauer Wm, painter, Mt. Vernon 

Roser L, general merchandise, Mt. Vernon 

Rothline D, carpenter, Blairsville 

Rowe Charles A, Constable Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Rowe Charles O, farmer, Lynn twp, Solitude 

Rowe Clay, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Rowe Eli, Mt. Vernon 

ROWE GEORGE B, Trustee Black Township, Mt. Vernon 

ROWE GEORGE W% farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Rowe Harvey, Mt. Vernon 

Rowe James, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Rowe J H, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Rowe Samuel R, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Rowe Simon, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Rowe Virgil A, Constable Marrs Township, Caborn 

Rowe Walter, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Rubel Jacob, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Ruchti Frederick (Baldwid & Ruchti) New Harmony 

Ruchti Jacob, laborer, New Harmony 



POSEY COUNTY DIRECTORV. 219 

Rudd Clifford (col), farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Rudd Joshua (col), farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Rudisell C R, Mt. Vernon 

Ruger Caroline (widow), Mt. Vernon 

Ruger, George H, Mt. Vernon 

Ruminer John, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Ruminer Joseph, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Ruminer Michael, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Ruminer Urbin. farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Rusding John, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Rusding Frank, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Russell Ellen, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Russell James, farmer, Black twp, Farmersville 

Russell Samuel, farmer, Black twp, Farmersville 

Russell Samuel, jr, blacksmith, Farmersville 

Russell Wm, cooper, Mt. Vernon 

Russell W B, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon . 

Rutter A W, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Rutter David, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Rutter J A, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Rutter J M, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Rutter John W, physician, Cynthiana 

Rutter Wm, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Rutledge John C, physician, Poseyville 

Rutledge John J, confectioner, Stewartsville 

S 

Saalwaeither Jacob, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

Saalwaeither Matthias, jr, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Saalwaeither Matthias, jr, jr, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Saalwaeither Matthias sr, fanner, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Salwarchter, John, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Sahur Lewis, farmer, Lynn twp, New Harmony 

Sailer John, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Saleyer Thomas, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Saltzman Abel, farmer, Lynn twp, Solitude 

Saltzman Elias, farmer, Lynn twp, New Harmony 

Saltzman Elizabeth, Lynn twp, New Harmony 

Saltzman George Jr, farmer, Lynn twp, New Harmony 

Saltzman George Sr, farmer, Lynn twp, New Harmony 

Saltzman Jacob, farmer, Lynn twp, New Harmony 

Saltzman John R, farmer, Lynn twp New Harmony 



2 20 POSEY COUNTY DIRECTORY. 

Saltzman L B, farmer, Lynn twp, New Harmony 

Saltzman Mary J, Lynn twp, New Harmony 

Saltzman Milton, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Saltzman Robert, farmer, Lynn twp, New Harmony 

Saltzman Thomas, farmer, Lynn twp, New Harmony 

Salwachter M S, blacksmith, Blairsville 

Sample Wm, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Sampson James, naturalist, New Harmony 

Sandboch Ed, laborer, Mt. Vernon 

Sanders C H, physician, Caborn 

Sanders Harrison, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville • 

Sanders Harry, clerk, Mt. Vernon 

Sanders Henry, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Sanders James, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

Sanders John T, farmer. Harmony t»vp, New Harmony 

Sanders Thomas, New Harmony 

Sands W R, stoves and tinware, Cynthiana 

SARLL.S RICHARD, JR, Boots & Shoes, Mt. Vernon 

Sarlls Richard, sr, Grain, Mt. Vernon 

Satmar Peter, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Sauer Alexander, farmer, Robinson twp, St. Wendel 

Sauer Ferdinand, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Saulweller, Frederick, farmer, Bethel twp, New Harmony 

Savage Hannah, Lynn twp, New Harmony 

Savage John, sr, farmer, Lynn twp, New Harmony 

Scales Henry W, farmer, Lynn twp, New Harmony 

Schaar Henry, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Schaber George, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Schaefler Barbara, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Schafer Frank, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Schafer George, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Schafer Godfrey, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Schafer Henry, saloon, New Harmony 

Schafer Matt, farmer, Robb twp, Stewartsville 

Schafer Wm, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Schaffer Frederick, farmer, New Harmony 

Schaffer Frederick, farmer, Marrs twp, West Franklin 

Schaney Joseph, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Schapker Henry, farmer, Smith twp. Cynthiana 

Schapker John, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Schauberger Peter, farmer, Robinson twp, St. Wendel 

Schauss Charles, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Schauss George, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Schauss Jacob, farmer, Robinson twp, St. Wendel 



POSEY COUNTY DIRECTORY. 221 

Schauss Jacob D, farmer, Robinson twp, St. Wendel 

Schauss John, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Schauss John A, farmer, Robinson twp, St. Wendel 

Schauss Phillip Sr, farmer, Robinson twp, St. Wendel 

Schebly John, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Scheffer Peter, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsvile 

Scheidel Michael, harness and saddles, Mt. Vernon 

Schelhorn Mary, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Schelhorn Theodore, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Scheller Adam, farmer, Lynn twp, New Harmony 

Scheller John A, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Scheller John, jr, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Schenk E B, Hardware, Mt. Vernon 

SCHENK EBEBHARD P, County Commissioner, Black twp, 

Mt. Vernon 
Schenk Frank, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 
Schenk George, Notary Public, St. Phillip 
Schenk Mariah, (widow), Mt. Vernon 
Schenk Theodore, farmer, Robinson twp, St. Wendel 
Scherer David, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 
Scherer George, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 
Scherer George, jr, farmer, Robinson twp, Parkers 
Scherer Henry, farmer, Robinson twp, Parkers 
Scherer Jacob, undertaker, St. Wendel 
Scherer Jacob, sr, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 
Schettler Adam, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 
SCHIEBER AUOITST, groceries and saloon, Mt. Vernon 
Schiela Charles (J F Schiela & Bro), Mt. Vernon 
SCHIELA J F & BRO, furniture, Mt. Vernon 
Schiela J Ferdinand (J F Schiela & Bro), Mt. Vernon 
Schiela Mary (widow), Mt. Vernon 
Schiff Henry, blacksmith, St. Wendel 
Schiff Jacob, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 
Schiff John, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 
Schiff Wm, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 
Schiffman John, shoemaker, St. Phillip 
Schilli Christian, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 
Schisler Adam, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 
Schisler Henry, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 
Schisler John, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 
Schisler John B, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 
Schisley Mary (widow), Mt. Vernon 
Schlauser Christian, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 
Schmall Jacob, New Harmony 



222 POSEY COUNTY DIRECTORY. 

Schmall Wm, plasterer, New Harmony 

Schmelter Anton, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Schmer Wm, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Schmidt — (see Schmitt, Smith) . 

Schmidt Henry, farmer, Marrs twp, West Franklin 

Schmidt John H, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Schmidt Margaret, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Schmidt Phillip, farmer, Black twp, Mr. Vernon 

Schmitt Adam, jr, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Schmitt Adam, sr, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Schmitt Albert, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Schmitt Albert, laborer, New Harmony 

Schmitt Benjamin, saddler, St. Wenbkl 

Schmitt Eugene, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Schmitt Felix farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Schmitt Henry P, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

Schmitt Joseph, jr, farmer, Robinson twp, St, Wendel 

Schmitt Joseph, sr, Assessor Robinson twp, St. Wendel 

Schmitt Lawrence, laborer, New Harmony 

Schmitt Peter, New Harmony 

Schmitt P Jr, carpenter, Blairsville 

Schmitt Wendel, tailor, New Harmony 

Schmoke Conrad, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Schnable Christina, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Schnable Henry, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Schnack Frederick, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Schnack Henry, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Schnarr Henry, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Schnaar John, farmer, Marrs twp, Mt. Vernon 

Schneck Henry, farmer, Robb twp, Stewartsville 

Schnee Crispus, New Harmony 

Schnee Cyrus, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Schnee David M, grocer, New Harmony 

Schnee Henry T, clerk, New Harmony 

Schnee John, laborer, New Harmony 

Schnee Silas, New Harmony 

Schnee Simeon, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Schnee Wm H, farmer, Harmonv twp, New Harmony 

SCHNEIDER «& €©, groceries and saloon, Mt. Vernon 

Schneider Frederick, sr, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Schneider John, laborer, Mt. Vernon 

Schneider Valentine (Schneider & Co), Mt. Vernon 

Schneider Wm, Mt. Vernon 

Schneider Wm, merchant, St. Wendel 



POSEY COUNTY DIRECTORY. 223 

Schneider Wm L, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Schnell Andrew, farmer, Marrs twp, West Franklin 

Schnur Florentine (widow), Mt. Vernon 

Schnur Henry jr, miller, Mt. Vernon- 

SC'HIflJR HE^Rl Sr, flouring mills, Mt. Vernon 

SCHOENTRUP JOItN, pastor catholic Church, Mt. Vernon 

Schrader Frederick, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Schrader Henry, Grocer, Mt. Vernon 

Schreiber Adam, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Schreiber Andrew, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Schreiber Catherine, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Schreiber Elizabeth, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Schreiber George, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Schreiber John A, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Schreiber John, sr, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Schrepper John, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Schrer Charles, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Schroeder August, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Schroeder Frederick, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Schroeder Frederick, jr, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Schroeder Henry, jr, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Schroeder Henry, sr, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Schucker Henry, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Schucker Herman, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Schuler Frank, farmer, Robinson twp, St. Wendel 

Schull John H, teamster, New Harmony 

Schull John W, laborer, New Harmony 

Schulty Frank Jr, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Schulty Frank, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Schulty Henry, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

SCHULTZ OSCAR T, physician, Mt. Vernon 

Schuttler John, farmer. Robb twp, Stewartsville 

SCHUTZ CHARLES H, harness and saddles, Mt. Vernon 

Schutz Emily, (widow) Mt. Vernon 

Schutz Lewis D, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Schutz Phillip J, farmer, Robb twp, Stewartsville 

Schwartz Margaret, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Schwartz Phillip, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Schweickhart Bernhardt, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Schweickhardt Dorothea, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Schweickhardt Frederick, jr, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Schweickhardt Frederick, sr, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Schweickhardt Jacob, jr, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Schweickhardt John, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 



224 



POSEY COUNTY DIRECTORY. 



Schweickhardt John M, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Schweickhardt Peter, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Schweickhardt Phillip, sr, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Schweickhardt Peillip, jr, farmer, Rybinson twp, Blairsville 

Schweikorth Stephen, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

Schwenzer Louisa. Robinson twp, St. Wendel 

Schwitzer Joseph, farmer, Bethel twp, New Harmony 

Scott Elizabeth, Center twp, Wadesville 

Scott George, farmer, Lynn twp, New Harmony 

Scott Mariah, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Scott Wm, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

Sears Cass A, farmer, Bethel twp, New Harmony 

Sears Henry, Assessor Bethel Township, New Harmony 

Seib August, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Seib George, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Seib Nicola, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Seibert Jacob B, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Seibert John, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Seibert Phillip, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Seibert Valentine, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Seifert Frederick, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Seifert John, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Seifert Nicholas, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Seifert Wm, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Seifert John, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Seiler John sr, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Seiler Lionharth, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Sellers Samuel (col), laborer, Mt. Vernon 

Septer Francis, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Septer Jacob, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Server Enoch, Machinist, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Sevin Andrew, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Sevin John, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Seward Joshua, farmer, Lynn twp, Solituee 

Seward Wm E, farmer, Lynn twp, Solitude 

Shane George, farmer, Lynn twp, New Harmony 

Shane Levi, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Shane Wm, farmer. Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Sharp Mary E, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Shaw Allen, farmer, Black twj), Mt. Vernon 

Shaw Charles, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Shaw David, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon • 

Shaw Wm, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Shelhorn Charles, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 



t>OSEV COUNTY DIRECTORY.. 22$ 

Shelhorn George E, blacksmith, Mt. Vernon 

Shelhorn John E, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Shelhorn John P, farmer, Robinson twp, St. Wendel 

Shelton John, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Shelton Thomas D, farmer, Robb twp, Stewartsville 

Sheppard John, tinner, Mt. Vernon • .. .., 

Sheppard John, cooper, New Harmony . 

Sheppard Lewis P, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Sheppard Thomas P, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville : 

Sheppard Wm H, Bethel twp, New Harmony 

Shertz Conrad, laborer, Mt. Vernon 

Shieber Frederick, farmer, Point twp, Mr. Vernon 

Shierbaum August, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon f, 

Shierbaum M A, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

SHIERBAUM WM, Assessor Black twp, Mt, Vernon. 

Shirley F M, farmer. Bethel twp, New- Harmony . 

SHORE JOHST t, Agt L & N Ry & Coal dealer, Mt. Vernon 

Short D A, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Short Robert, fisherman, Point twp, Hovey 

Short Wm H, farmer, Point twp, Hovey ... 

SHOWERS A J, hotel, Cynthiana , 

Showers Charles E, Cynthiana 

Shryock Latayette, laborer, Mt. Vernon 

Shuck George F, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Sickman Frederick, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony . 

Sickman Gideon, farmer,, Harmony twp, New Harmony - ; 

Sickjost Henry, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville ,, 

Siethoff Maria, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville . 

Seithoff Anton, farmer, Robinson twp, St. Wendel 

Sigler George, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Simon P H, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Simonson W C, traveling agent, Mt. Vernon ; . 

Simpson John W, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Simpson Richard H, farmer, Robb twp, Stewartsville 

Sims W H, Mt. Vernon ^.. 

Skelton James H, Justice of the Peace, Cynthiana t 

Slater Charles W, proprietor Register, New Harmony 

Slater Harry, compositor, New Harmony . 

Sleitenhardt Jacob, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Slinker Erhart, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn r 

Sloan James, farmer, Lynn twp, New Harmony 

Sloat John, laborer, Mt. Vernon 

Sloat Joseph, plasterer, Mt. Vernon 

Slocumb George W, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana . , 



9 h 26 POSEY COUNTY DIRECTORY. 

Slygh George, Black twp,' Mt. Vernon 
Slygh Isaac T, carpenter, Mt. Vernon 
Smiley James W;> farmer; Smith twp, Cynthiana 
Smith — (see Schmidt, Sekmitt) 
Smith A E, drayman, 1 Mt-. Vernon 
Smith A E, farmer, Smith twp, Gynthiana 
Smith Bazil (col), laborer, Mt. Vernon 
Smith C B r farmer, Smith twp, Gynthiana 
SMITH CHA1KLES, yTR, saw mills, Mt. Vernon 
Smith Charles, sr, saw mills Mt. Vernon 
Smith Crawford, farmer, Robb twp, Stewartsville 
Smith Eli, farmer, Bkck twp, Mt. Vernon 
S1HTII ELIJAH tf, farmer, Lynn twp, Solitude 
Smith Elsb erry , trustee Smith twp, Cynthiana 
SJI IT II ELWOOD, Dentist, Mt. Vernon 
Smith F, wagonmaker, Caborn 
< Srnitfrr Francis; Smith twp, Cynthiana 
SMITH FRANK, clerk, Mt. Vernon 
Smith George A, farmer, Bkck twp, Mt. Vernon 
Smith George D, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 
Smith George W, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 
Smith Gilbert, carpenter, New Harmony 
Smith Henry, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 
Smith Henry, tailor,- Wadesville 
Smith I B; farmer; Smith twp, Cynthiana 
Smith Isaac; farmers Point twp, Mt. Vernon 
Smith James A, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 
Smith James B, Harmony twp, farmer, New Harmony 
Smith James R, farmer, Smith' twp, Cynthiana 
Smith Jemimah, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 
Smith John, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 
Smitb John A, teamster J Mt. Vernon 
Smith John Bailey, bookkeeper, Cynthiana 
Smith John C; farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 
Smith J Wesley, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 
Smith Leander, farmer > Lynn twp 
Smith Marion, farmer, Robb twp, Stewartsville 
Smith P R, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 
Smith Reese, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 
Smith Richard, (col), farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 
Smith Richard, farmer,' Robb twp, Stewartsville 
Smith Richard, saloon, Bethel twp, Griffin 
Smith Robert, plasterer, New Harmony 
Smith Silas R, constable, Smith twp, Gynthiana 



POSEY tGOUNTV DIRECTORY. 22>* 

Smith Willis, (col), laborer, Mr. Vernon ^ 

Smith Wm C, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Smith Wm F, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Smith W H, farmer, Black twp,. Mt. Vernon 

Smith Wm H, farmer, Robb twp, Stewartsville - 

Smith Wm M, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana . 

SMITH WM W» carpenter, Mt. Vernon ■ 

SMYTH RICH AR1K physician, Mt.. Vernon, * 

Sneider Henry, farmer, Robb twp, Stewartsville 

Snelling E R, carpenter, New, Harmony 

Snelling E R, jr, carpenter, New Harmony 

Snow Wm, farmer, Point twp, Mt-. Vernon 

Snyder David, farmer, Harmony twp,, New Harmony i . 

Snyder James, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Soaper John T, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony .. 

Soechtig Henry, watchmaker, Mt. Vernon 

Soelner Henry, farmer, Marrs twp, West Franklin 

Sommers Henderson, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

SPARKS ALBERT A, editor & prop democrat,. Mi. VeRnon.v* 

Specht Michael, farmer, Marrs twp, West Franklin 

Speicher Wm, farmer, Lynn twp, New. Harmony 

SPENCER EDWIK V, physician;- Mt.. Vernon, , 

SPENCER ELIJAH M,- attorney at la w v Mt. Vernon 

Sperbeck G W, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Spies Henry, farmer, Robinson twp, St. -Wendel 

Spiker Ernest, farmer, Marrs twp,, Caborn 

Spiker Phillip, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Spillman & McEvoy, Livery stable, Mt. Vernon 

Spillman I M, laborer, New Harmony 

Spillman Isaac, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Spillman Leonard, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville | 

Spillman Samuel, farmer, Robb twp,. Stewartsv.illr ,.t 

Spillman W S, (Spillman & McEvoy) Mt. : Vernon * 

Spottsville David, farmer, Point twp, Mt, Vernon ■ 

Spottsville Denis, farmer, Point twp,. Mt. Vernon 

Spottsville Frank, farmer ^ Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Spottsville George, farmer, Point twp,. Mt. Vernon 

Spottsville Paris, farmer, Point twp, Mt, Vernon. 

Springer Charles sr, saw mills, Mt. Vernon i 

Springer Henry, sawyer, Mt. Vernon 

Stacer John B, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville • 

Stacer Wm L, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville. 

Stackler Frank, Mt. Vernon 

Stackler John, farmer, Robinson, twpy St. Wendel 



228 POSEY COUNTY DIRECTORY. 

Stafleth Robert, shoemaker, St. Phillip 
Stagrur Wm, cabinetmaker, Wadesville 
Staiger George, shoemaker, Blairsville 
Staley John, farmer Harmony twp, New Harmony 
Stallings Aaron, farmer, Lynn twp, New Harmony 
Stallings Alexander, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 
Stallings Alonzo, farmer, Lynn twp, New Harmony 
Stallings Alvin, farmer, Bethel twp, New Harmony 
Stallings Andrew, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 
Stallings Benjamin, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 
Stallings Blackford, farmer, Lynn twp, New Harmony 
Stallings Calvin, farmer, Lynn twp, New Harmony 
Stallings Edward T, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 
Stallings Elias, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 
Stallings Elijah, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 
Stallings Elijah Jr, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 
Stallings Elisha, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 
Stallings Francis M, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 
Stallings George W Jr, Harmony twp, New Harmony 
Stallings George W Sr, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 
Stallings Henry C, farmer, Bethel twp, New Harmony 
Stallings James H, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 
Stallings James Jr, farmer, Lynn twp, New Harmony 
Stallings James S, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 
Stallings Jane, Lynn twp, New Harmony 
Stallings Jasper, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 
Stallings John, farmer, Lynn twp, New Harmony 
Stallings John H, farmer, Lynn twp, New Harmony 
Stallings John W, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 
Stallings Laura, Center twp, Wadesville 
Stallings Leander D, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 
Stallings L J, farmer,- Harmony twp, New Harmony 
Stallings Lewis, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 
Stallings Marcus, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 
Stallings Mary A, Harmony twp, New Harmony 
Stallings Moses M, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 
Stallings Samuel L, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 
Stallings Thomas W, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 
Stallings Wesley, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 
Stallings Willis, farmer, Lynn twp ; Wadesville 
Stallings Wilson W, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 
Stallings Wm A, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 
Stallings Wm H, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 
Stallings Wm M, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 



POSEY COUNTY DIRECTORY. 229 

Stallings Wright, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

Stallman A A F, wagonmaker, Mt. Vernon 

Stallman Christ, shoemaker, Mt. Vernon 

Stallman John, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Stallman Wm H, shoemaker, Mt. Vernon 

Stalze George, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Stalze Henry W, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Staples S H, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Starken August, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Stamps Richard W, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Stamps Wm W, farmer, Robb twp, Stewartsville 

Stang George, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Stang Jacob, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Stang Simon, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Stannard Howard, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Stannard Mary (widow), Mt. Vernon 

STAJTSTARD WM G, manager W U tel Co, Mt. Vernon 

Statz Frederick, farmer, Robinson twp, St. Wendel 

Staymeyer, Christopher, farmer, Center, twp, Wadesville 

Steckner Jacob, laborer, Mt. Vernon 

Steel Wick, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Stegner Wm, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

Steffan Charles, Harness & Saddles, Mt. Vernon 

Stegmire Christ, cooper, Wadesville 

Stein Henry, farmer, Black twp, Caborn 

Steinbrenner C, shoemaker, Stewartsville 

Steinkemp Gerhard, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Stephan John, General store, Marrs twp, West Franklin 

Stephan John P, Marrs twp, West Franklin 

Stephens A T, farmer, Lynn twp, New Harmony 

Stephens E A, farmer, Lynn twp, New Harmony 

Stephens Henry, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Stephens Joseph W, farmer, Robb twp, Stewartsville 

Stephens M W, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Stephens Nathaniel, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Stephens O W, farmer, Robb twp, New Harmony 

Stevens Daniel F, farmer Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Stevens F P, wagonmaker, Cynthiana 

Stevens Henry, Mt. Vernon 

Stevens James A, drayman, Mt. Vernon 

Stevens James B, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Stevens John, Mail contractor Mt. Vernon 

Stevens J W, wagonmaker, Poseyville 

Stevens Sarah, Mt. Vernon 



230 POSEY COUNTY DIRECTORY. 

Stevens Thomas, trader, Mt. Vernon 

Stevens Wm, farmer, Bethel twp, New Harmony 

Stewart Harry W, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Stewart Isaac, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Stewart Marshall, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Stewart Mary (widow), Mt. Vernon 

Stewart Wesley, barber, Mt. Vernon 

Stewart Wm, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Stierle Frank, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Stierle J, saloon, Blairsville 

Stierle Martin, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Stilwell James T, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Stilwell W G, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Stinnett L D, farmer, Robb twp, Stewartsville 

Stinnett Rufus M, Assessor Robb Township, Stewartsville 

Stitt Hiram, farmer, Lynn twp, New Harmony 

Stitt S G, farmer, Lynn twp, New Harmony 

Stock Henry, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Stoflet Robert, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Stoker Benjamin, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Stoker James, miller, New Harmony 

Stoker L D, engineer, New Harmony 

Stonecipher H H, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Stonecipher J C, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Storm Benjamin, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Storm D M, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Stout PI C, solicitor, Mt. Vernon 

Stowe Charles W, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Strattman Anton, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Stritter Fred, tonsorial artist, Mt. Vernon 

Stritter Wm L, Mt. Vernon 

Strouse Samuel I, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Strowman Peter, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Strupp Jacob, farmer, Robinson twp, Parkers 

Sturgeon W H, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Sturgis Sarah Jane, Bethel twp, New Harmony 

Sturli Maria, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Sturm Jacob New Harmony 

Sturm J C, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Sullivan R L, speculator, Mt. Vernon 

SULMVAtf W L,, clerk, Mt. Vernon 

Summers Isaac, farmer, Lynn twp, Graftton 

Summers James, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Summers John, farmer, Point twp, Mt, Vernon 



POSEY COUNTY DIRECTORY. 23] 

Surnmet Andrew, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 
Summet John, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 
Sussick Charles, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 
Sutton Henry, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 
Sweeney Edward, farmer, Lynn twp, Grafton 
Sweeney Samuel, farmer, Lynn twp, Grafton 
Sweeney Wm, cooper, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 
Sweet James, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 
Sweeten Caroline, Marrs twp, West Franklin 
Sweeten Joseph, Mt. Vernon 
Sword Mary, Smith twp, Cynthiana 



Tadlock J L, laborer, Mt. Vernon 

Talbert Ernest N, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Taliafaro Marshall, bricklayer, Mt. Vernon 

Taliafaro Theodore, butcher, Mt. Vernon 

Tappen Joseph, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Taylor Amanda, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Taylor Frank, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Taylor George I, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Taylor Israel, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Taylor Wm, farmer, Lynn twp, Solitude 

Tempesmavr Henry, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Tempesmair Henry Jr, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Templeton A J, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Templeton Armenius, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Templeton Charles, farmer, Lynn twp, Solitude 

Templeton Elizabeth H (widow), Mt. Vernon 

Templeton Gilbert C, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Templeton Worth, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Tennison Finley, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Tennison Francis M, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

Tennison Jacob, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Tennison Wm, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

TEKTE CHRISTIAN F, groceries and saloon, Mt. Vernon 

Terry George, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Terry H E. farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Terry O C, Agent Adams Express Co, Mt. Vernon 

Thaxton Wm, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Theierckauf Catherine, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Theirckhauf Frederick, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 



232 POSEY COUNTY DIRECTORY. 

Theierckhauf Jacob, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Thielman Henry, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Thomas A E, miller, New Harmony 

Thomas Adam, (col), laborer, Mt. Vernon 

THOMAS «fc TOPPER, (E E Thomas & Wm Topper), Coal 

Mt. Vernon 
Thomas Charles, farmer, Black twp, Grafton 
Thomas David, farmer, Black twp, Farmersville 
Thomas E E, (G W & E E Thomas), Mt. Vernon 
Thomas Enoch, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 
Thomas F N, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 
Thomas George G, farmer, Lynn twp, Grafton 
Thomas G W & E E, commission and forwarding, Mt. Vernon 
Thomas George W, jr, farmer, Lynn twp, Grafton 
Thomas George W, sr (G W & E E Thomas), Mt. Vernon 
Thomas Henry, farmer, Carmi, III. 

THOMAS JAMES E, farmer, Black twp, Grafton 
Thomas James H, farmer, Lynn twp, Grafton 
Thomas Miles, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 
Thomas Osborne R, Trustee Bethel twp, New Harmony 
Thomas R G, carpenter, Mt. Vernon 
Thomas Roger R, farmer, Lynn twp, Grafton 
Thomas S L, farmer, Black twp, Farmersville 
Thomas Thomas N, farmer, Mt. Vernon 
Thomas W J, farmer, Black twp, Grafton 
Thomason Catherine, (widow), Mt. Vernon 
Thompson Elizabeth, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 
Thompson George, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 
Thompson J L, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 
Thompson John H, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 
Thompson J R, farmer. Black twp, Mt. Vernon 
Thompson Lewis, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 
Thompson Lewis T, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 
Thompson R H, farmer, Bethel twp, New Harmony 
Thompson Virgil, farmer, Bethel twp, New Harmony 
Thompson, Wm, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 
THOMSON THOMAS, school teacher, Mt. Vernon 
Thornton Eugene, farmer. Black twp, Solitude 
Thornton Wm, farmer, Black twp, Farmersville 
Thrall & Mumford, groceries, New Harmony 
Thrall Eugene S (Thrall & Mumford), New Harmony 
Throop George S, steamboatman, Mt. Vernon 
Tiecken Anna, Robinson twp, Blairsville 
Tiecken Bernhardt, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 



POSEY COUNTY DIRECTORY. 233 

Tillman Christian, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 
Tinsley W D, Mt. Vernon 

TESCHENDORF EMMA, Miss, 

PASSIOITABLB MXX-I-X1TEII 

And Dealer in all kinds of Millinery Goods, Fancy Articles and Laces, 

MAIN STREET, MT. VERNON 

Tischendorf Gotlieb, carpenter, Mt. Vernon 

Todd J H, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Todd Wm, farmer, Lynn twp, Solitude 

Tompkins George, blacksmith, Mt. Vernon 

Topper Richard, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Topper Wm, (Thomas & Topper), Mt. Vernon 

Towell Wm H, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Townsend Mark, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Trafford Edward, farmer, Black twp, Grafton 

Trafford Elisha, Gen store &P M, Grafton 

Trafford Elvira, Black twp, Grafton 

Trafford John, farmer, Black twp, Grafton 

Trafford Lawrence E, farmer, Lynn twp, Grafton 

Trafford Wm L, farmer, Lynn twp, Grafton 

Trafford W W, farmer, Black twp, Grafton 

Trainor George K, farmer, Robb twp, Stewartsville 

Trainor Wm A, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Traudt Phillip, (Pfeffer & Traudt), Mt. Vernon 

Travis George C, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Travis Henry, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Travis Joseph, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Tretheway George, blacksmith, Stewartsville 

Tretheway John, carpenter, New Harmony 

Tretheway W O, blacksmith, New Harmony 

Tromator Christian, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Tron Conrad, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Truempe Daniel, tinner, Mt. Vernon 

TRUEMPE FREDERICK, Manufacturer Cigars, Mt. Vernon 

TRUSCOTT THOMAS J, Att'y, at Law, New Harmony 

Tucker Joseph, (col), laborer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Turner Rice, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Twigg R D, painter, New Harmony 

Twigg Wm A, painter, New Harmony 

U 

Uhde Louis, farmer, Blaek twp, Mt. Vernon 
Umbach George, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 



234 POSEY COUNTY DIRECTORY. 

Umble James, farmer, Bethel twp, New Harmony 

Umgerding Christian, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Underwood Joseph, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Uri A W, General store, Mt. Vernon 

Urkman George, farmer, Marrs twp, West Franklin 

Usery Mandalia, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Utley Allen, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Utley Bradford, farmer, Bethel twp, New Harmony 

Utley Carrol, farmer, Black twp, Farmersville 

Utley Frank, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Utley Gilbert, farmer, Bethel twp, New Harmony 

Utley Hamilton, drayman, Mt. Vernon 

Utley John, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Utley John J, Mt. Vernon 

Utley J P, farmer, Lynn twp, Solitude 

Utley Larkin, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Utley Lindley, farmer, Bethel twp, New Harmony 

Utley Merrill H, farmer, Lynn twp, Solitude 

Utley Montraville, farmer, Bethel twp, New Harmony 



Vandergrift Chas, Engineer, New Harmony 

Vandergrift Louis, steamboatsman, New Harmony 

Vanderver Thompson, farmer, Lynn twp, New Harmony 

Vandiver Thomas J, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Vanway John F, farmer, Bethel twp, New Harmony 

Vanway W F, farmer, Bethel twp, New Harmoxy 

Varner Asbury, teamster, New Harmony 

Varner Francis M, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

Vaughn Elbert, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Vaughn Wm, farmer, Lynn twp, New Harmony 

Vaupel Edward, farmer, Lynn twp, Solitude 

Vaupel George, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Vaupel Henry, sr, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Vaupel Henry, jr, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Vaupel Henry, sr, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Vaupel John, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Vicker John, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Viets Wm, farmer, New Harmony 

Vines Charles W, farmer, Lynn twp, Solitude 

Vint David R, engineer, Mt. Vernon 

\TXT JAJIES K, Agt P D & E Ry & Justice. Cynthiana 



POSEY COUNTY DIRECTORY. 235 

Voegeli Charles, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 
Voegeli Joseph, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 
Vosloh Wm, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

W 

Wade Abner, faraier, Center twp, Wadesville 

Wade Andrew J, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

Wade Braxton, farmer, Center, twp, Wadesville 

Wade Caleb D, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

Wade Charles, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Wade George W, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Wade Henry R, New Harmony 

Wade I G, New Harmony 

Wade I G W, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

Wade James E, New Harmony 

Wade Jessie, New Harmony 

Wade John B, farmer, New Harmony 

Wade John F, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

Wade Joshua, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Wade Joshua D Jr, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

Wade Levi M, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

Wade Martha, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

Wade Thomas S, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Wade Warren, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

Wade Wesley, farmer, Robb twp, Stewartsville 

W T ade Wm D, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

Wade Wm J, New Harmony 

Wade Z C, farmer, Lynn twp, Wadesville 

Wagner Christian, merchant, BLAmsviLLE 

Wagner George, miller, Mt. Vernon 

Wagner George, laborer, New Harmony 

Wagner Henry, farmer, Robinson twp, St. Wendel 

Wagner Jacob, farmer, Robinson twp, St. Wendel 

Wagner Thomas D, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Wagnow John, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Walden James, New Harmony 

Walker Clarence, farmer, Black twp, Grafton 

Walker Eli, farmer, Lynn twp, Grafton 

W T alker G B, farmer, Robb twp, Stewartsville 

Walker J, flour mills, Poseyville 

Walker James, farmer, Lynn twp, Grafton 

Walker James S, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 



236 POSEY COUNTY DIRECTORY. 

Walker John H, farmer, Black twp, Grafton 

Walker Marshall, farmer, Lynn twp, Grafton 

Walker Vincent, farmer, Lynn twp, Grafton 

Walker W D, farmer, Lynn twp, Grafton 

Wallace Charles L, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Wallace Harber, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

Wallace John farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Wallace Joshua, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Wallace Pierce, Sewing Machine Agent, New Harmony 

Wallace Thomas, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Wallen John, farmer, Mt. Vernon 

Waller Abraham, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Waller David, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Waller Middyaun, farmer, Bethel twp, New Harmony 

Walling F G, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Walls Isaac, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

Walls James, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Walls John, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Walter Charles, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Walter Fritz, saloon, Mt. Vernon 

WALTER PETER, European Hotel Mt. Vernon 

Walters Thomas, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Walz John, boots and shoes (mf'r) New Harmony 

Waltz John, farmer, Marrs twp, West Franklin 

Wambach Gus, butcher, Mt. Vernon 

Wannemiller Clemmus, farmer, Marrs twp, West Franklin 

Ward Francis, New Harmony 

Ward Joseph, bootmaker, New Harmony 

Ward VVm, blacksmith, New Harmony 

WARHEEMANN JOHN, stoves and tinware, roofing and 

guttering, New Harmony 
Warel John, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 
Wargel Anton, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 
Warpenburg Win, farmer, Bethel twp, New Harmony 
Warren Wm, teamster, New Harmony 
Warring Thos W, dairyman, Mt. Vernon 
Warth C F, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 
WASEM ANDREW, (C & A Wasem), Mt. Vernon 
Wasem C & A, Grocers & Saloon, Mt. Vernon 
WASEM CHARLES, saloon, Mt. Vernon 
Wasem Frank, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 
Wasem Louis, clerk, Mt. Vernon 
Wassmer Wendel, farmer, Robinson twp, Parkers 
Wassmer Peter, farmer, Robinson twp, Parkers 



POSEY COUNTY DIRECTORY. 237 

Wathen B F, farmer, Point twp, Mr. Vernon 

Wathen Marcus, farmer, Lynn twp, New Harmony 

Watson Geo L, laborer, Mr. Vernon 

Watson John, farmer, Lynn twp, New Harmony 

Watson Nathan, farmer, Lynn twp, New Harmony 

Watson Vincent, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Watterman Frederick, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Watterman Henry, farmer, Robinson twp, St. Wendel 

Watts I C, physician, Mt. Vernon 

Weaver Adam G, farmer, Marrs twp, West Franklin 

Weaver J G, New Harmony 

Weaver Mary C, Marrs twp, West Franklin 

Weaver O W, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Webb Allen, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Webb Alonzo, farmer, Lynn twp, Grafton 

Webb Edward, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Webb James, farmer, Black twp, Grafton 

Webb James, laborer, New Harmony 

Webb Reuben, farmer, Lynn twp, Grafton 

Webb Wm E, farmer, Robb twp, Stewartsville 

Webb Wm H, farmer, Lynn twp, Grafton 

Weber Ben, Mt. Vernon 

Weber Cyrus, New Harmony 

Weber George, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

WEBER PETER, tailor, New Harmony 

WECKESSER VINCENT, Groceries & saloon, Mt. Vernon 

Wedeking Ernest, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Wedeking Frederick, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

WEEVER JOHN B, physician, Mt. Vernon 

Wehr Adam, laborer, Mt. Vernon 

Wehr Charles, saloon, New Harmony 

Wehr Jacob, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Wehr John, laborer, Mt. Vernon 

Weikmyer Mary, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Weikman Phillip, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Weil Abe, clerk, Mt. Vernon 

Weilbrenner Fred, clerk, Mt. Vernon 

WEILBREMER GEO A, sewing machines, Mt. Vernon 

WEILBRENNER G H, groceries, Mt. Vernon 

Weimer Ernest, Mt. Vernon 

Weinzeophlin August, farmer, Marrs twp, West Franklin 

Weinzeophlin Michael, farmer, Marrs twp, West Franklin 

Weir Anna D Mrs, Mt. Vernon 

Weir Charles P, druggist, Mt. Vernon 



238 POSEY COUNTY DIRECTORY. 

Weir Charles W, farmer, Lynn twp, Grafton 

Weir Clarence L, farmer, Lynn twp, Grafton 

Weir David I, farmer, Black twp, Crafton 

Weir William, farmer, Lynn twp, Grafton 

Weir W W, druggist, Mt. Vernon 

Weis Emanuel, farmer, Robinson twp, St. Wendel 

Weis George, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Weis Henry, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Weis Henry F, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Weis John, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Weis Louis, farmer, Robinson twp, St. Wendel 

Weis William, farmer, Black twp, Caborn 

Weisinger Allison V, cabinetmaker, Mt. Vernon 

Weisinger David, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

WEISEWER GODFREY, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

WEISEVGER HEJfRY, cabinetmaker, Mt. Vernon 

Welborn George, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Welborn G W, farmer, Robb twp, Stewartsville 

Welborn John, farmer, Lynn twp, Grafton 

WELBORN JOSEPH F, capitalist, Mt. Vernon 

Welborn Joseph R, farmer, Smith twp, Poseyville 

Welborn Murphy, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Welborn Rebecca, (widow), Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Welborn Wm, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Wells John, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Wells L D, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Wenner Jacob, farmer, Marrs twp, West Franklin 

Wenner Peter, farmer, Marrs twp, West Franklin 

Wentzel Frederick, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Wentzel John E, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Wentzel Phillip, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Wenzel George, farmer, Robinson twp, St. Wendel 

Wenzel John M, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Wenzel Kilan, farmer, Robinson twp, St. Wendel 

West Elisha, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

West John farmer, Lynn twp, New Harmony 

West Wilson, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Westfall Logan, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Westfall R M, farmer, Smith twp, Poseyville 

Westfall Wm F, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Westhoff Anton, farmer, Black twp. Mt. Vernon 

Westhoff Nicholas, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Weyer Henry, wagonmaker, Blairsville 

Weyer Henry, sr, farmer, Robinson twp, St. Wendel 



POSEY COUNTY DIRECTORY. 239 

Wharton J W, teacher, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 
Wheatcraft Charles, brickmaspn, New Harmony 
Wheatcraft John C, carpenter, New Harmony 

WHEELER JOHN H, 

HOUSE PAINTER AND PAPER HANGER, 

Wheeler John L, saloon, New Harmony 

Whipple Elijah, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Whipple Marion, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Whipple Samuel, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

White A J, farmer, Lynn twp, New Harmony 

White David, carpenter, New Harmony 

White George, hostler, New Harmony 

White George, farmer, Bethel twp, New Harmony 

White Henry, New Harmony 

White John C, New Harmony 

White Robert M, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

White Thomas J, farmer, Bethel twp, New Harmony 

White Wm, farmer, Lynn twp, New Harmony 

Whitehead John S, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Whiting Albert, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Whiting C H, merchant, Cynthiana 

Whiting Clement, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Whiting C W, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Whiting Harrison, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Whiting J C, druggist, Cynthiana 

Whiting J H, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Whiting John T, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Whiting Sarah, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Whiting W J, merchant, Cyntaiana 

Whitman A T, farmer, Mt. Vernon 

Whitney W T, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Whitson A M, farmer, Bethel twp, New Harmony 

Whitworth James W, (J W Whitworth & Co), Mt. Vernon 

Whitworth J W & Co. real estate, Mt. Vernon 

Whitworth Wm H, Notary Public, Mt. Vernon 

Wiggins James T, farmer, Robb twp, Stewartsville 

Wiggins J M, farmer, Smith twp, (|ynthiana 

Wilber H B, Wholesale Grocer, Mt. Vernon 

Wilderman Charles, farmer, Marrs twp, West Franklin 

Wilderman John, farmer, Marrs twp, West Frankli 

Wildmoth Wm D ; clerk, New Harmony _ 

Wiley George farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 



24O POSEY COUNTY DIRECTORY 

Wiley James, farmer, New Harmony 

Wiley John, farmer, Lynn twp, New Harmony 

Wiley Luke, farmer, Lynn twp. New Harmony 

Wiley Lytle, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Wilhelm John A, barber, New Harmony 

Wilkerson James, farmer, Black twp, Ml Vernon 

Wilkerson Josiah S, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Wilkerson Ruark, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Wilkey Mrs Conrad, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Wilkinson A B, farmer. Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Wilkinson B A, farmer, Lynn twp, New Harmony 

Wilkinson John B, farmer, Lynn twp, New Harmony 

Wilkinson L J, merchant, Cynthiana 

Wilkinson M A, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Wilkinson Seth, farmer, Lynn twp, New Harmony 

Wilkinson Wm A, farmer, Lynn twp, New Harmony 

Will Adam, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Will John, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Williams H L, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Williams H H, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Williams Asa C, capitalist, Mt. Vernon 

Williams Bailey, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyvii.le 

Williams Bennett, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Williams Benjamin F, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Williams Catharine, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Williams Charles V, farmer, Bethel twp, New Harmony 

Williams C F, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Williams Daniel, farmer, Bethel twp, New Harmony 

Williams Elison, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Williams Elizabeth, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Williams Fernando, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Williams Floyd, physician, Caborn 

Williams Francis M, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Williams Frederick B, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

Williams George, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Williams G B, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Williams G H, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Williams George M, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Williams Isaac, farmer, Bethel twp, New Harmony 

Williams James, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Williams Jeremiah, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Williams J F, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Williams John, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Williams John, butcher, Wadesville 



POSEY COUNTY DIRECTORY. 241 

Williams John H, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Williams J P, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Williams Laviga T, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Williams Leroy, Lawyer, Poseyville 

Williams Martin, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Williams Samuel, farmer, Lynn twp, New Harmonr 

Williams S C Mrs, millinery, Mt. Vernon 

Williams S H, harnessmaker, Poseyville 

Williams S Jett, farmer, Wadesville 

Williams T J, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Williams W G, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Williams William, County Commissioner, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Williams William, farmer, Marrs twp, West Franklin 

Williams Wm A, farmer, Lynn twp, Wadesville 

Williams Wm H, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Williams Wm H jr, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Williams Wm R, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Williams Zepaniah, farmer, Lynn twp, Wadesville 

Williamson Wm H, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 

Willis Eli, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

Willis Harvey, farmer, Lynn twp, Solitude 

Willis James, farmer, Lynn twp, Solitude 

Willis John, farmer, Lynn twp, Solitude 

Willis John B, farmer, Lynn twp, Solitude 

Willis Joshua, farmer, Lynn twp, Solitude 

Willis Robert M, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

Willis Samuel, farmer, Lynn twp, Solitude 

Willis Thomas, Mt. Vernon 

Wilman Catharine, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Wilman John, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Wilman Leonard, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Wilman Valentine, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Wilmoth Harry L, brickmason, New Harmony 

Wilsey Frank, farmer, Lynn twp, New Harmony 

Wilsey George W, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Wilsey John, farmer, New Harmony 

Wilsey David, cooper, New Harmony 

Wilson A F, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Wilson Alexander, farmer, Lynn twp, New Harmony 

Wilson Alexander M, farmer, Lynn twp, New Harmony 

Wilson Ben F, laborer, Mt. Vernon 

Wilson C C, farmer, Lynn twp, New Harmony 

Wilson Christopher, farmer, Lynn twp, New Harmony 

Wilson Christian, engineer, Mt. Vernon 



242 POSEY COUNTY DIRECTORY. 

Wilson Eugene A, confectionery, Mt. Vernon ^ 

Wilson Evaline (widow), Mt. Vernon 

Wilson George H, Deputy county clerk, Mt. Vernon 

Wilson Isaac, farmer, Lynn twp, New Harmony 

Wilson John, farmer, Smith twp, Poseyville 

Wilson John, ("Bud"), farmer, Lynn twp, New Harmony 

Wilson John C, Mt. Vernon 

Wilson John jr, farmer, Lynn twp, New Harmony 

Wilson John, sr, farmer, Lynn twp, New Harmony 

Wilson Joseph, farmer, Lynn twp, New Harmony 

Wilson Lawrence, farmer, Lynn twp, New Harmony 

Wilson Leroy C, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Wilson Lewis W, farmer, Lynn twp, New Harmony 

Wilson Martha, Lynn twp, New Harmony 

Wilson Robert, farmer, Lynn twp, New Harmony 

Wilson W F, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Wilson Wm, farmer, Lynn twp, New Harmony 

Wilson Wm C, farmer, Lynn twp, New Harmony 

Wilt Lawrence, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Wimpelberg John, farmer, Marrs twp, West Franklin 

Wimpelberg Louis, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Wimpelberg Wm W, saloon & Oysters Mt. Vernon 

Winings B L, carriage trimmer, Mt, Vernon 

Winketer Martin, farmer, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Winnegar Adam, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Winneham Marion, farmer, Bethel twp, New Harmony 

Winter, Matthew, farmer, Center twp, Wadesville 

Winternheimer Christian, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Winternheimer George, jr, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Winternheimer Jacob, trustee Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Winternheimer Jacob, jr, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Winternheimer Jacob, sr, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Winternheimer, John, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Winternheimer, Louis, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Wertz C F, pub, "Republican/' Mt. Vernon 

Wolf Emanuel, trader, Mt. Vernon 

Wolf Freeman & Pfeffer, butchers Mt. Vernon 

Wolf Henry, farmer, Robinson twp, St. Wendel 

Wolf Henry, shoemaker, Mt. Vernon 

Wolf Herman, clerk, Mt. Vernon 

Wolf Isaac, (Wolf, Freeman & Pfeffer), Mt. Vernon 

Wolf John, farmer, Robinson twp, St. Wendel 

Wolf Joseph, clerk, Mt. Vernon 

WOL.F liEOPOIiD, ice dealer and m'gr Tel Ex, Mt. Vernon 



POSEY COUNTY DIRECTORY. 243 

Wolf Wendel, farmer, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Wolfe Wm, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Wolfinger Frederick, farmer, Marrs twp, West Franklin 

Wolfinger John Mrs, Marrs twp, West Franklin 

Wolfinger Louis, farmer, Mt. Vernon 

Wood Isaac, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Woodham C, New Harmony 

Woodry Albert, physician, Poseyville 

Woods Jacob, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Woods Wesley, hostler, New Harmony 

Woods W W, farmer, Bethel twp, New Harmony 

Woody Albert, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Woody & Keck, foundry, Mt. Vernon 

WOODY JOHN C, (Woody & Keck), Mt. Vernon 

Woody & Co, general merchandise, Solitude 

WOODY SAMUEL,, (Woody & Co), Solitude 

Woody Scott, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Wraze Moses, barber, Wadesville 

Wright W A, ditcher, Mt. Vernon 

Wycoff Joseph, farmer, Harmony twp, New Harmony 



Yager Wm, Mt. Vernon 
Yeager Isaac N, Smith twp, Cynthiana 
Yoney Peter B, Smith twp, Cynthiana 
York Angelo, farmer, Black twp, Grafton 
York Bryant, farmer, Lynn twp, Grafton 
York Christopher, farmer,' Lynn twp, Grafton 
York David, farmer, Lynn twp, Grafton 
York Elisha E, farmer, Lynn twp, Grafton 
York Frank, farmer, Black twp, Grafton 
York James B, farmer, Lynn twp, Grafton 
York Jones, farmer, Black twp, Grafton 
York Reuben, farmer, Black twp, Grafton 
York Samuel, farmer, Lynn twp, Grafton 
York Thomas, farmer, Lynn twp, Grafton 
York Wm, farmer, Black twp, Grafton 
York Wm H, farmer, Black twp, Grafton 
York Wm W, farmer, Lynn twp, Grafton 
Young Frank W, Smith twp, Cynthiana 
Young G B, farmer, Robb twp, Poseyville 
Young James, Smith twp, Cynthiana 



244 POSEY COUNTY DIRECTORY. 

Young John G, Clerk,_ Mt. Vernon 
Young Minor, farmer, Smith twp, Poseyville 
Young Richard, Saloon, Smith twp, Cynthiana 
Young Thomas, Smith twp, Cynthiana 
Young T P, Physician, Poseyville 
Young Wm, Smith twp, Cynthiana 
YMMER HORY, general store, Grafton 
Yunker Phillip, Saloon, Mt. Vernon 

Z 

Zaner George, jr, farmer, Marrs twp, West Franklin 

Zaner George, sr, farmer, Marrs twp, West Franklin 

Zaner Michael, farmer, Marrs twp, West Franklin 

Zeigler George, farmer, Marrs twp, West Franklin 

Zeigler George Mrs, Marrs twp, West Franklin 

Zeigler John, farmer, Marrs twp, West Franklin 

Zeigler John J, clerk, Mt. Vernon 

Zeigler Michael, farmer, Marrs twp. West Franklin 

Zellner Doretha, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Zenor Fountain, laborer, Mt. Vernon 

Zenor Henry, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Zenthoefer George, farmer, Robinson twp, St. Wendel 

Zenthoefer Peter, farmer, Robinson twp, St. Wendel 

Zergiebel George, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Zergiebel Zachariah, farmer, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Zilk Frank, farmer, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Zillox Phillip, Mt. Vernon 

Zimmerman Adam, distiller Mt. Vernon 

Zimmerman David, farmer, Robinson twp, St. Wendel 

Zimmerman Jacob, farmer, Robinson twp, ST. Wendel 

Zimmerman Jacob, Mt. Vernon 

Zimmerman John, farmer, Robinson twp, St. Wendel 

SKDODBBMAJV JOIO, shoemaker, Mt. Vernon 

Zimmerman Wm, carpenter, Mt. Vernon 

Zuspadron Adam, farmer, Marrs twp, West Franklin 

Zwig Herman, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Zwig Moritz, farmer, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 



Business-Directory 

OF 

MT, VERNON and N£W HARMONY, 



;-~i>o-, « ■♦► 



Abstracts of Titles. 

Green & Hutcheson, Mt. Vernon 

Agricultural Implements. 

Barter & Co, (see advertisement), Mt. Vernon 
Brinkman & Sons, Mt. Vernon 
Finch V C, (see advertisement), Mt. Vernon 
Hayden & Johnson, Nnw Harmony 

Assessors (Township). 

Sears Henry, Bethel twp, New Harmony 
Shierbaum Wm, Black t-,vp, Mt. Vernon 
Cox Stinson, Center twp, Wadesville 
Ford Thomas, Harmony twp, New Harmony 
Alexander Marshal, Lynn twp, Grafton 
King George, Marrs twp, Mt. Vernon 
Bell Isaac, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 
Stinnett Rufus M, Robb twp, Stewartsville 
Scmidt Joseph sr, Robinson twp, St. Wendel 
Cully Joseph, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Attorneys at Law. 

Bolton Frank D, New Harmony 
Cooper James A, New Harmony 
EDSON WM P, Mt. Vernon 



246 BUSINESS DIRECTORY OF MT. VERNON & NEW HARMONY 

HOYEY «fc MEXZIES, Mt. Vernon 

Jackson Walter S, Mt. Vernon 

LEONARD FREDERICK P, Mt. Vernon 

LOUDON WM, Mt. Vernon 

Moore Joseph, Mt. Vernon 

OWM ERNEST O, New Harmony 

PEARSE MIETOX W, Mt. Vernon 

SPENCER EEIJAH M 9 Mt. Vernon 

TR11COTT THOMAS J, New Harmony 



Bakeries. 



Dexheimer Henry, Mt. Vernon 
Franck Geo H, Mt. Vernon 



First National, Mt. Vernon 

Mt. Vernon Banking Co, Mt. Vernon 

New Harmony Banking Co, New Harmony 

Barbers. 

FELDMA^i GEORGE, Mt. Vernon 
HEXRICH GEORGE, Mt. Vernon 
Hinch Wm S, Mt. Vernon 
Kreipke Wm, New Harmony 
Stritter Fred, Mt. Vernon 
Wilhelm John A, New Harmony 

Billiards. 

Ford Thos S, New Harmony 
Kahn Isaac, Mt. Vernon 
Marian & Harp, Mt. Vernon 

Blacksmiths and Wagonmakers. 

Acuff Wm H, Mt. Vernon 
Baldwin & Bishop, New Harmony 
Baldwin & Ruchti, New Harmony 
BARTER JOHN H, Mt. Vernon 
RRIXIOIAX «& SOtfS, Mt. Vernon 
Buchanon Samuel. Mt. Vernon 
CRALLEY JOSEPH K, Mt. Vernon 
Hironimus John, Mt. Vernon 



BUSINESS DIRECTORY OF MT. VERNON & NEW HARMONY. 247 

KIEBENGER JOHN, New Harmony 

MAGIEE R & J T, Mt. Vernon 
Reed Wm, New Harmony 
Robson Richard P, New Harmony 
Ruchti Frederick, New Harmony 
Tretheway W O, New Harmony 

Boarding Houses. 

Black Wm, Mt. Vernon 
Cox Joshua, Mt. Vernon 
Drinkwater Taylor, New Harmony 
Duckworth Julia, Mt. Vernon 

Books & Stationery. 

CHARLES WIEEIS, Mt. Vernon 
Leffel & Williams, Mt. Vernon 

Boots and Shoes. 

Hinch John D, Mt. Vernon 
Ford, Owen & Co, New Harmony 
Fretageot A H & Bro, New Harmony 
RABEN & NAAS, Mt. Vernon 
ROSENBAEM BROS, Mt. Vernon 
Roser L, Mt. Vernon 
SAREES RICHARD. Mt Vernon 
WAE5E JOHN, New Harmony 

Brick Manufacturers. 

BRINIOIAN & SONS, (tile), Mt. Vernon 
BROWN EDWARD, Mt Vernon 
DRANSFIEED «& SON, (tile), New Harmony 
FOSHEE CHAREES, Mt. Vernon 

Cigars & Tobacco (Manufacturers*). 

FEEDMAN GEORGE, Mt. Vernon 
*FOGAS A C, Mt. Vernon 
Ford Thos S, New Harmony 
HENRICH GEORGE. Mt. Vernon 
MILLER JITEIITS C, New Harmony 
*TRITEI?IPE FREDERICK, Mt. Vernon 
WIESON EUGENE, Mt. Vernon 



248 BUSINESS DIRECTORY OF MT. VERNON & NEW HARMONY. 

Clergymen. 

Dodge Henry A (Presbyterian), Mt. Vernon 
Knotts L F (Methodist), New Harmony 
Pfifer (German Methodist), Mt. Vernon 
Scammahorn John (Methodist), Mt. Vernon 
SCHOE^TRUP JOHtf, (Catholic) Mt. Vernon 

Clothing. 

Roser L, Mt. Vernon 
Uri A W, Mt. Vernon 
Maas Jacob, Mt. Vernon 
HcCAEEISTER & SOtf, Mt. Vernon 
Brown Henry, New Harmony 
Ford, Owen & Co, New Harmony 
Fretageot A H & Bro, New Harmony 
Harlam & Son, Mt. Vernon 
JAROOSKI Ii, Mt. Vernon 
RABES «& If A AS, Mt. Vernon 
ROSEXBAEJI BROS, Mt. Vernon 

Coal. 

SHORE JOHW E, Mt. Vernon 
THOMAS & TOPPER, Mt. Vernon 

Commissioners (County). 

Bailey John J, New Harmony 
Schenk Eberhard P, Mt. Vernon 
Williams Wm, Poseyville 

Confectionery. 

Franck Geo H Mt. Vernon 
Finch John, Mt. Vernon 
CJEISS WOT C, Mt. Vernon 
FILLER JEEIES C, New Harmony 
WIESOtf EECJEWE A, Mt. Vernon 

Constables. 

Allison Gabriel, Lynn twp, Solitude 
Baker Thomas L, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 
Barton James M, Smith twp, Cynthiana 



BUSINESS DIRECTORY OF MT. VERNON & NEW HARMONY. 249 

Bonnell Charles V, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 

Caborn James L, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Caborn John L, Mans twp, Caborn 

Danberry Geo H, Lynn twp, Grafton 

Defur Job, Robb twp, Poseyville 

Downs Redding, Center twp, Wadesville 

Finnell Ben W, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Kelton Jonathan, Center twp, Wadesville 

Lewis James, Robb twp, Stewartsville 

Neidermeier Frederick, Robinson twp, Blairsville 

Pendell Alfred, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Plummer Odious, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Rowe Chas A, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 

Rowe Virgil A, Marrs twp, Caborn 

Smith Silas R, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Crockery and Glassware (^Glassware only). 

BYME THOMAS, Mt. Vernon 
^ROtfBACH M, (Glassware), Mt. Vernon 
Harlam A Ed, Mt. Vernon 
HARTUNG H, & >". Mt. Vernon 
HOEHX & GBABERT, Mt. Vernon 
*McARTHl R W n & €0, Mt. Vernon 
Rosengart Max Mt. Vernon 
SCHS EIOER & CO, Mt. Vernon 
S* '1I1EKER AUGUST, Mt. Vernon 
TEWTE C F, Mt. Vernon 
WASE3I € & A, Mt. Vernon 
WECKESSER VDf€Ei\T, Mt. Vernon 
WEIEBRENEFER G M, Mt. Vernon 
*WEIR C P, Mt. Vernon 

Dentists. 

Ford Wm P, New Harmony 
SMITH ELWOOD, Mt. Vernon 

Drugs. 

CROSTBACH MAtfUEE, Mt. Vernon 

McARTHUR W H & €0, Mt. Vernon 
Thrall & Mumford, New Harmony 
WEIR CHAS P, Mt. Vernon 
Ford, Owen & Co, New Harmony 



250 BUSINESS DIRECTORY OF MT. VERNON & NEW HARMONY. 

Fretageot A H & Bro, New Harmony 
Harlam & Son, Mt. Vernon 

Dry Goods. 

Lichtenberger F W & Sons, New Harmony 
HcC AEEISTER & SOtf, Mt. Vernon 
RABEN & BTAAS, Mt. Vernon 
ItOSEXBA I Jl BROS. Mt. Vernon 
Roser L, Mt. Vernon 

Fish Dealers— Wholesale. 

COLXIETS FRA^K, New Harmony 
Page Elijah, Mt. Vernon 

Flouring Mills. 

EVERTSOtf EDGAR S, et al, Mt. Vernon 

FORD & CORBEff, New Harmony 

HIBtfUT THEODORE, (see advertisement), Mt. Vernon 

Pfeffer & Traudt (see advertisement), Mr. Vernon 

Schnur Henry sen, Mt. Vernon 

Forwarders. 

Louisville & Nashville Railway (John L Shore Agt), Mt. Vernon 
Adams Ex Co (O C Terry Agt) Mt. Vernon 
Shearer Albert W, (Agt Ad Ex Co), Stewartsville 
Thomas G W & E E, Mt. Vernon 

Foundry. 

Woody & Keck, Mt, Vernon 

Furnishing Goods. 

Harlam & Son, Mt. Vernon 
Henrich George, Mt. Vernon 
Raben & Naas, Mt. Vernon 
Rosenbaum Bros, Mt. Vernon 
Roser L, Mt. Vernon 

Furniture. 

Barter & Co, (see advertisement), Mt. Vernon 
Finch V C & Co, (see advertisement), Mt. Vernon 



BUSINESS DIRECTORV OF MT. VERNON & NEW HARMONY. 251 

Lichtenberger F W & Sons, New Harmony 

Schiela J F & Bro, (manufacturers — see advertisement) Mt. Vernon 

Grain. 

Fuhrer & Boyce, Mt. Vernon 
Rosenbaum Bros, Mt. Vernon 
Sarlls Richard sr, Mt. Vernon 

Groceries- 

Bischoff Jacob & Co, (see advertisement), Mt. Vernon 

Byrne Thomas, Mt. Vernon 

Eispenscheidt Peter, Mt. Vernon 

Harlam A Ed, Mt. Vernon 

Hartung L & N, Mt. Vernon 

Hoehn & Grabert, Mt. Vernon 

Mott & Co, New Harmony 

Naas John, Mt. Vernon 

Rosenbaum Bros, Mt. Vernon 

Rosengart Max, Mt. Vernon 

Schieber August, Mt. Vernon 

Schnee David M, New Harmony 

Schneider & Co, Mt. Vernon 

Schrader Henry, Mt. Vernon 

Tente Christian F, Mt. Vernon 

Wasem C & A, Mt. Vernon 

Weckesser Vincent, Mt. Vernon 

Weilbrenner G M, Mt. Vernon 

Wilber H B, (wholesale), Mt. Vernon 

Guns & Ammunition. 

Barter & Co, (see advertisement), Mt. Vernon 
Bieker Frank, Mt. Vernon 
Ries J Thomas, Mt. Vernon 

Hardware. 

Barter & Co, (see advertisement), Mt. Vernon 
Finch V C & Co, (see advertisement), Mt. Vernon 
Owen E F & Co, New Harmony 
Schenk E B, Mt. Vernon 

Harness and Saddles. 
Krei Charles, Mt. Vernon 
Husband James, New Harmony 



252 BUSINESS DIRECTORY OF MT. VERNON & NEW HARMONY. 

Scheidel Michael, Mt. Vernon 
Scutz Chas H, Mt. Vernon 
Steffan Charles, Mt. Vernon 

Hats & Caps. 

Ford, Owen & Co, New Harmony 
Fretageot A H & Co, New Harmony 
Harlam & Son, Mt. Vernon 
Maas Jacob, Mt. Vernon 
McCallister & Son Mt. Vernon 
Raben & Naas Mt. Vernon 
Rosenbaum Bros, Mt. Vernon 
Roser L, Mt. Vernon 

Hotels. 

Brettner Louis, (Hotel de Brettner), Mt. Vernon 
Damron U G, (Damron House), Mt. Vernon 
Frank Noah, New Harmony 
Randolph David, New Harmony 
Walter Peter, (European). Mt. Vernon 

Ice Dealer. 

Wolf Leopold, Mt. Vernon 

Insurace (*Pire & Life)- 

Finch V C & Co, Mt. Vernon 
*Hutchinson Alex, Mt Vernon 
*Leonard Mark T, Mt. Vernon 
*Leukroth Reinhold, Mt. Vernon 
*Pelham Louis, New Harmony 
Tente C F, Mt. Vernon 

Junk. 
Barthelemy Isidor, New Harmony 

Justice of the Peace. 

(Term of office four years.) 

Alexander Chas, Elected May 1, 1879, Lynn twp, Mt. Vernon 
Allyn Sidney, Elected November 3, 1878, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 
Baldwin Wm, Elected July 6, 1880, Harmony twp, New Harmony 
Barrett Jos A, Elected March 7, 1878, Harmony twp, New Harmony 



BUSINESS DIRECTORY OF MT. VERNON & NEW HARMONY. 253 

Benner Jno L, Elected October 14, 1879, Marrs twp, Caborn 
Cox Josuha Elected October 24, 1878, Black twp, Mr. Vernon 
Daniel Wm P, Elected April 29. 1881, Black twp, Mr. Vernon 
Downen Geo T, Elected April 14, 1880, Robinson twp, Blairsville 
Durlin Geo W, Elected May i, t88o, Lynn twp, Solitude 
Hermann John, Elected August 31, 1879, Center twp, Wadesville 
Hill L N, Elected April 21, 1880, Robb twp, Poseyvtlle 
Lawrence Jas W, Elected April 14, 1880, Point twp, Mt. Vernon 
Laylor Jno G, Elected August 14, 1881, Marrs twp, Mt. Vernon 
McShane Michael, Elected April 20, 1879, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 
Reed Wm. Elected November 1, 1880, Harmony twp, New Harmony 
Skelton Jas H, Elected June 16, x88r, Smith twp, Cynthiana 
Vint Jas K, Elected June 21, 1881, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Livery Stables. 

Gentry Bros, New Harmony 
Bacon & Bloomer, Mt. Vernon 
Gregory & Son, Mt. Vernon 
Spillman & McEvoy, Mt. Vernon 

Loan Agents. 

Green George S, Mt. Vernon 

Lumber. 

Duclos & Sons, (stave manufacturers), New Harmony 
Hiatt J H New Harmony 
Pretorius Wm, Mt. Vernon 

Marble "Works. 

Hattich Adam, Mt. Vernon 
Loerch C & G, Mt. Vernon 
Miller J W, New Harmony 

Meat Markets. 

Brooks Richard, New Harmony 
Geilman S J, Mr. Vernon 
Hempfling Lawrence, Mt. Vernon 
Wolf, Freeman & Pfeffer, Mt. Vernon 



Merchant Taylors. 



Fuelling L, Mr. Vernon 
Harlam & Son, Mt. Vernon 



254 BUSINESS DIRECTORY OF MT. VERNON & NEW HARMONY. 

Maier Conrad, Mt. Vernon 
Mann Philipp, Mt. Vernon 
Weber Peter, New Harmony ' 

Millinery. 

Dismer E Mrs, Mt. Vernon 
Drinkwater M E Mrs, New Harmony 
Patterson A Mrs, Mt. Vernon 
Tichendorf Emma Miss, Mt. Vernon 
Williams S C & Co, Mt. Vernon 

Newspapers. 

Mt. Vernon Democrat, Albert A Sparks, Proprietor 
Mt. Vernon Sun, James M Barter, Publisher 
New Harmony Register, C W Slater, Proprietor 
Posey Banner, Thos Collins, Proprietor, Mt. Vernon 
Posey Co Republican, C F Wertz, Proprietor, Mt. Vernon 
Western Star, Leffel & Williams, Proprietors, Mt. Vernon 

Notaries Public. 

(Term of office four years.) 

Cole Wm J, Appointed August 22, 1881, Blairsville 
Cross James, Appointed September 6, 1878, Wadesville 
Davis John B, Appointed March 6, 1878, Mt. Vernon 
Denberger Henry, Appointed May 14, 1879, Stewartsville 
Edson Wm P, Appointed August 22, 1881, Mt. Vernon 
Hunsdon Henry. Appointed September 17, 1881, New Harmony 
Leonard Jos A, Appointed May 13, 1880, Poseyville 
Loudon Wm, Appointed January 10, 1881, Mt. Vernon 
Lowe Geo W, Appointed January 31, 1879, Cynthiana 
McArthur Thos M, Appointed September 22, 1881, Mt. Vernon 
Moore Jos, Appointed November 18, 1878, Mt. Vernon 
Munte Max, Appointed January 12, 1881, Mt. Vernon 
Pelham Louis, Appointed August 28, 1879, New Harmony 
Schenk George, Appointed October 3, 1881, St. Phillip 
Spencer Elijah M, Appointed February 21, 1877, Mt. Vernon 
Truscott Thos J, Appointed June 17, 1881, New Harmony 
Whitworth Wm H, Appointed December 2, i88o,Mt. Vernon 
Williams Wm, Appointed April 14, 1880, Poseyville 
Wimpelberg Wm W, Appointed April 13, 1880, Mt. Vernon 

Photographer. 
Jones L W, Mt. Vernon 



BUSINESS DIRECTORY OF MT. VERNON & NEW HARMONY. 

Physicians. 
Brooks L D, New Harmony 
Bucklin G W, New Harmony 
Cross Wm, New Harmony 
Gotwald G A, New Harmony 
Harper John, Mt. Vernon 
Haynes J B, Mt. Vernon 
Holton Wm H, New Harmony 
McDonald Dennis, New Harmony 
Neal Daniel, New Harmony 
Pearse Simeon H, Mt. Vernon 
Peckinpaugh G R, Mt. Vernon 
Ramsey D C, Mt. Vernon 
Rawlings Samuel O, New Harmony 
Spencer E V, Mt. Vernon 
Smyth Richard, Mt. Vernon 
Weever John B, Mt. Vernon 

Postmasters. 
Brown Edward, Ml. Vernon 
Caborn Walter S, Caborn 
Cross James, Wadesville 
Deig Elizabeth, St. Phillip 
Fisher G W Cynthiana 
Goslee James, Poseyville 
Gregory Henry T, Farmersville 
Griffin Samuel, Griffin 
Hoffman Mrs, Parkers 
Kreipke T W, Blairsville 
Lutz George D West Franklin 
Miller Julius C, New Harmony 
Naas George, St. Wendel 
Phillips John S, Hovey 
Shearer Albert W, Stewartsville 
Trafford Elisha, Grafton 
Woody Samuel H, Solitude 

Real Estate. 
Owen & Fitton, New Harmony 
Whitworth J W & Co, Mt. Vernon 

Restaurants. 
Fillingim Enoch, New Harmony 
Geiss W C, Mt. Vernon 
Griffhn Joseph S, Mt. Vernon 



•55 



256 BUSINESS DIRECTORY OF MT. VERNON & NEW HARMONY. 

Roofers— Metal. 

Barter & Co, (see advertisement), Mr Vernon 
Finch V C & Co, (see advertisement), Mt. Vernon 
Gronemeier Simon, (see advertisement), Mt. Vernon 
Wardelmann John, New Harmony 

Saloons. 

Bedell G T, New Harmony 

Bischoff Jacob & Co, (see advertisement), Mt. Vernon 

Eispenscheidt Peter, Mt. Vernon 

Frielinghausen Anton, Mt. Vernon 

Kahn Isaac, Mt. Vernon 

Lyon James, New Harmony 

Marian & Harp, Mt. Vernon 

Meeker Lee, Mt. Vernon 

Naas John, Mt. Vernon 

Newsom Albeit G, New Harmony 

Niederest John, Mt. Vernon 

Reeves Wm, Mt. Vernon 

Schafer Henry, New Harmony 

Schieber August, Mt. Vernon 

Schneider & Co, Mt. Vernon 

Schrader Henry, Mt. Vernon 

Walter Fritz, Mt. Vernon 

Walter Peter, Mt. Vernon 

WasemC & A, Mt. Vernon 

Wasem Charles, Mt. Vernon 

Wehr Charles, New Harmony 

Wimpelberg Wm, Mt. Vernon 

Yunker Phillip, Mt. Vernon 

Saw Mills. 

Duclos & Sons, New Harmony 
Smith Charles & Son, Mt. Vernon 
Springer Charles sr, Mt. Vernon 

Second Hand Goods. 

Barthelemy Isidor, New Harmony 

Sewing Machines. 

Noel W J L, (New Home and others), Mt. Vernon 
Quick Charles, Mt. Vernon 



BUSINESS DIRECTORY OF MT. VERNON & NEW HARMONY. 257 

Wallace Price, (Singer), New Harmony 
Weilbrenner G A, (Singer), Mt. Vernon 

Shoemakers. 

Gronemeier Charles, Mr. Vernon 

Hartman Wm, New Harmony 

Holtzmier J Peter, Mt. Vernon ' ' 

Imboden Peter, Mt. Vf.rnon 

Leukroth Reinhold, Mt. Vernon 

Mu^selman Michael, Mt. Vernon 

Reckert Fritz, Mt. Vernon 

Stallman Christian, Mt. Vernon 

Walz John, New Harmony 

Zimmerman John, Mt. Vernon 

Stoves <Sc Tinware. 

Barter & Co, (see advertisement), Mr. Vernon 
Finch V C & Co, (see advertisement), Mt. Vernon 
Gronemeier Simon (see advertisement) 
Lichtenberger F W & Sons New Harmony 
Schenk Eberhard B, Mr. Vernon 
Wardelmann John, New Harmony 

Teachers of Public Schools. 

Ackman Amanda Miss, Cynthiana 
Adams B F, Stewartsville 
Adams J B, Wadesville 
Alexander Marshall, New Harmony 
Allbright C A, Mt. Vernon 
Armstrong Emma Miss, New Harmony 
Barter Vina Mrs, Farmfrsville 
Black Lizzie B Miss, Wadesville 
Bogen Albert, Blairsville 
Breece Silas, Caborn 
Bridon Jas I, Grafton 
Britton Ella Miss. Poseyville 
Brown J Nelson, Wadesville 
Campbell Anna Miss, Caborn 
Campbell James B. Caborn 
Carr Mollie A Miss, New Harmony 
Cartwright Alice Miss, Wadesville 
Cooper Ollie Miss, Mt. Vernon 



25 8 BUSINESS DIRECTORY OF MT. VERNON & NEW HARMONY. 

Conlin John, Mt. Vernon 
Conlin W T, Mt. Vernon 
Cox W J, Wadesville 
Curtis G W, Mt. Vernon 
Davis Mollie Miss, Cynthiana 
Davis W I, Mt. Vernon 
Dixon Ella Miss, Mt. Vernon 
Doerr Louis, St. Phillip 
Dougherty John T, Cynthiana 
Edson Ida Miss. Mt. Vernon 
Elliott Charles T, New Harmony 
Elliott Lena Miss, New Harmony 
Evans Horace M, New Harmony 
Ewing P B, Mt. Vernon 
Fertig J W, Mt. Vernon 
Fitzgerald Lizzie Miss, Wadesville 
Foshee Nannie Miss, Mt. Vernon 
French W Scott, Solitude 
Fretageot Mollie Miss, New Harmony 
Frey Celia Miss, Caborn 

Friedlev Geo E, Mt. Vernon 

Givens W B, Farmersville 

Hammil Tohn, Caborn 

Hammond Mary Miss, New Harmony 

Harper Alice Miss, Mt. Vernon 

Harper Fannie, Mt. Vernon 

Harper Ida Miss, Wadesville 

Hecht Rev, Mt. Vernon 

Highman Sallie Miss, New Harmony 

Hinch Eva Miss, Mt. Vernon 

Hinch Fannie Miss, Mt. Vernon 

Holton Kate C Miss, New Harmony 

Holton Wm E, Griffin 

Howard Silas G, Mt Vernon 

Jaquess Mary P Miss, Poseyville 

Jeffries James C, Mt. Vernon 

Jones J. B, (col), Mt Vernon 

Jones J E, Mt. Vernon 

Jones Marietta Miss, (col), Mt. Vernon 

Jones Mary H Miss, Mt. Vernon 

Jones W H, (col), Mt. Vernon 
Knight W O, Mt. Vernon 
Lawrence M H, Solitude 
Leavenworth H P, Mt. Vernon 



BUSINESS D1RECT0RV OF MT. VERNON & NEW HARMONY. 259 

Lewis Mary Miss, Mt. Vernon 
Lowe A A, Stewartsville 
Marrs U S, West Franklin 
Mc Arthur Thomas, Mt. Vernon 
McConnel Geo C, Solitude 
Moore John F, New Harmony 
Moore Mollie Miss, Mt. Vernon 
Montgomery V R, Cynthiana 
Mulchi Wm, Parker's Settlement 
Musselman Mel Miss, Mt. Vernon 
Nash Geo C, Griffin 
Nash Lou Miss, Wadesville 
Phillips Hattie M Miss, New Harmony 
Porteus R J, Miss, Mt. Vernon 
Rosborough Belle Miss Poseyville 
Ross J A, New Harmony 
Ruff Louisa C Miss, Caborn 
Runcie John W, Cynthiana 
Rutledge Emma Miss, Wadesville 
Scherer Henry, Blairsville 
Schmall Sarah E Mrs, Griffin 
Schnee Kate Miss, New Harmony 
Schwenzer Emma Miss, Blairsville 
Schwenzer Richard, Blairsville 
Seigler Geo E (col), Mt. Vernon 
Seward Alice Miss, Caborn 
Sewell O L, New Harmony 
Smith Eva Miss, Mt. Vernon 
Stephens A W, Blairsville 
Stephens O W, Wadesville 
Stonecipher J C, Mt. Vernon 
Sullivan E T jr, Mt. Vernon 
Sullivan Eunice Miss, Mt. Vernon 
Tate J B, Mt. Vernon 
Templeton R P, Solitude 
Templeton Thomas New Harmony 
Thomas Eliza R Mrs, New Harmony 
Thomson Clifford, Blairsville 
Thomson Thomas W, Mt. Vernon 
Thornburgh J E, Poseyville 
Wade Albert, Wadesville 
Wade John, Wadesville 
Wade Leroy M, Cynthiana 
Weir Mary Miss, Griffin 



260 BUSINESS DIRECTORY OF MT. VERNON & NEW HARMONY. 

Welker Geo, H. Mt. Vernon 
Wharton Burton T, Stewartsville 
Whitaker Mollie Miss, Mt. Vernon 
Wilkerson Lizzie Mrs, Mt. Vernon 
Williams John S, Mt. Vernon 
Williams J W, Posey ville 
Willis W H, New Harmony 
Wilson J B, New Harmony 
Wilson Mollie Miss, Mt. Vernon 
Wintenheimer Martin, Blairsyille 
Wright Sadie Miss Mt. Vernon 

Telephone Exchanges. 

Pelham Louis, Manager, New Harmony 
Wolf Leopold, Manager, Mt. Vernon 

Trustees— City. 

Owen Richard, Pres; Corbin John, Secty; Mumford Thos, jr, Treas, 

New Harmony 
Spencer Elijah M, Pres ; Fuhrer Wm C, Secty & Treas ; John Pfeffer, 

Mt. Vernon 

Trustees —Township. 

Thomas Osborne R, Bethel twp. New Harmony 
Rowe George D, Black twp, Mt. Vernon 
Cartwright John W, Center twp, Wadesville 
Bolton Frank D, Harmony twp, New Harmony 
Cartwright Vincent M, Lynn twp. New Harmony 
Dixon Samuel C, Marrs twp, Mr. Vernon 
Goss Robert B, Point twp, Mt. Vern< >n 
Faul George W, Robb twp, Stewartsville 
Wintenheimer Jacob, Robinson twp, Blairsyille 
Smith Elsberry, Smith twp, Cynthiana 

Undertakers. 

Hugo Jenkin T sr, New Harmony 
Newman A W, Mr. Vernon 
W'eisinger Henry, Mt. Vernon 

Watches & Jewelry. 

CLARK A J, Mt. Vernon 
Kight W A, New Harmony 
Soechtig Henry, Mt. Vernon 



WBUSHER, PRINTER, 

STATIONER, 

BLANK BOOK 

MANUFACTURER, 

Book Binber, anb paper IRuler, 

Good Work at Reasonable Prices, 
200 FIRST STREET, 

Sttoiflllth Hit, 



HENRY F. BLOUNT 



Makes the 



"TRUE BLUE" PLOW 

ASK YOUR MERCHANT FOR ONE AND DON'T TAKE 
ANY OTHER. • 

THEY ARE REALLY THE BEST P'XjO'^rS SOLD 
IN YOUR COUNTY. 

Davidson, Blount & Go,, 

MAKE THE 

STRONG, LIGHT RUNNING 




*A££$RSB -*.\H"S=r* W^- 



And guarantee it to be THE BEST FARM WAGON MADE in 
the West. Don't buy a foreign-made Wagon when you can get a 
BETTER made at home. You can see the stock we put in by calling 
at our works, 

Cor. LOCUST & FIFTH STREETS (opposite Igleheart's Mill), 



i I 



44 ii